• Free electron lasers (FELs) offer the unprecedented capability to study reaction dynamics and image the structure of complex systems. When multiple photons are absorbed in complex systems, a plasma-like state is formed where many atoms are ionized on a femtosecond timescale. If multiphoton absorption is resonantly-enhanced, the system becomes electronically-excited prior to plasma formation, with subsequent decay paths which have been scarcely investigated to date. Here, we show using helium nanodroplets as an example that these systems can decay by a new type of process, named collective autoionization. In addition, we show that this process is surprisingly efficient, leading to ion abundances much greater than that of direct single-photon ionization. This novel collective ionization process is expected to be important in many other complex systems, e.g. macromolecules and nanoparticles, exposed to high intensity radiation fields.
  • A novel form of amorphous carbon with sp-sp2 hybridization has been recently produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition showing the presence in the film of both polyynic and cumulenic species [L. Ravagnan et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 216103 (2007)]. Here we present a in situ Raman characterization of the low frequency vibrational region (400-800 cm-1) of sp-sp2 films at different temperatures. We report the presence of two peaks at 450 cm-1 and 720 cm-1. The lower frequency peak shows an evolution with the variation of the sp content and it can be attributed, with the support of density functional theory (DFT) simulations, to bending modes of sp linear structures. The peak at 720 cm-1 does not vary with the sp content and it can be attributed to a feature in the vibrational density of states activated by the disorder of the sp2 phase.
  • We report the production and characterization of a form of amorphous carbon films with sp/sp2 hybridization (atomic fraction of sp hybridized species > 20%) where the predominant sp bonding appears to be (=C=C=)n cumulene. Vibrational and electronic properties have been studied by in situ Raman spectroscopy and electrical conductivity measurements. Cumulenic chains are substantially stable for temperatures lower than 250 K and they influence the electrical transport properties of the sp/sp2 carbon through a self-doping mechanism by pinning the Fermi level closer to one of the mobility gap edges. Upon heating above 250 K the cumulenic species decay to form graphitic nanodomains embedded in the sp2 amorphous matrix thus reducing the activation energy of the material. This is the first example of a pure carbon system where the sp hybridization influences bulk properties.
  • A quantitative evaluation of the influence of sampling on the numerical fractal analysis of experimental profiles is of critical importance. Although this aspect has been widely recognized, a systematic analysis of the sampling influence is still lacking. Here we present the results of a systematic analysis of synthetic self-affine profiles in order to clarify the consequences of the application of a poor sampling (up to 1000 points) typical of Scanning Probe Microscopy for the characterization of real interfaces and surfaces. We interprete our results in term of a deviation and a dispersion of the measured exponent with respect to the ``true'' one. Both the deviation and the dispersion have always been disregarded in the experimental literature, and this can be very misleading if results obtained from poorly sampled images are presented. We provide reasonable arguments to assess the universality of these effects and we propose an empirical method to take them into account. We show that it is possible to correct the deviation of the measured Hurst exponent from the 'true' one and give a reasonable estimate of the dispersion error. The last estimate is particularly important in the experimental results since it is an intrinsic error that depends only on the number of sampling points and can easily overwhelm the statistical error. Finally, we test our empirical method calculating the Hurst exponent for the well-known 1+1 dimensional directed percolation profiles, with a 512-point sampling.
  • We report the experimental and theoretical investigation of the growth and of the structure of large carbon clusters produced in a supersonic expansion by a pulsed microplasma source. The absence of a significant thermal annealing during the cluster growth causes the formation of disordered structures where sp2 and sp hybridizations coexist for particles larger than roughly 90 atoms. Among different structures we recognize sp2 closed networks encaging sp chains. This "nutshell" configuration can prevent the fragmentation of sp species upon deposition of the clusters thus allowing the formation of nanostructured films containing carbynoid species, as shown by Raman spectroscopy. Atomistic simulations confirm that the observed Raman spectra are the signature of the sp/sp2 hybridization characteristic of the isolated clusters and surviving in the film and provide information about the structure of the sp chains. Endohedral sp chains in sp2 cages represent a novel way in which carbon nanostructures may be organized with potential interesting functional properties.
  • Nanostructured carbon films produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition have been studied by in situ Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra show the formation of a sp2 solid with a very large fraction of sp-coordinated carbyne species showing a long-term stability under ultra high vacuum. Distinct Raman contribution from polyyne and cumulene species have been observed. The long-term stability and the behavior of carbyne-rich films under different gas exposure have been characterized showing different evolution for different sp configurations. Our experiments confirm theoretical predictions and demonstrate the possibility of easily producing a stable carbyne-rich pure carbon solid. The stability of the sp2-sp network has important implications for astrophysics and for the production of novel carbon-based systems.