• We present a weak gravitational lensing analysis of 815 square degree of $i$-band imaging from the Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS-$i$-800). In contrast to the deep $r$-band observations, which take priority during excellent seeing conditions and form the primary KiDS dataset (KiDS-$r$-450), the complementary yet shallower KiDS-$i$-800 spans a wide range of observing conditions. The overlapping KiDS-$i$-800 and KiDS-$r$-450 imaging therefore provides a unique opportunity to assess the robustness of weak lensing measurements. In our analysis, we introduce two new `null' tests. The `nulled' two-point shear correlation function uses a matched catalogue to show that the calibrated KiDS-$i$-800 and KiDS-$r$-450 shear measurements agree at the level of $1 \pm 4$\%. We use five galaxy lens samples to determine a `nulled' galaxy-galaxy lensing signal from the full KiDS-$i$-800 and KiDS-$r$-450 surveys and find that the measurements agree to $7 \pm 5$\% when the KiDS-$i$-800 source redshift distribution is calibrated using either spectroscopic redshifts, or the 30-band photometric redshifts from the COSMOS survey.
  • The volume of data that will be produced by new-generation surveys requires automatic classification methods to select and analyze sources. Indeed, this is the case for the search for strong gravitational lenses, where the population of the detectable lensed sources is only a very small fraction of the full source population. We apply for the first time a morphological classification method based on a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) for recognizing strong gravitational lenses in $255$ square degrees of the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS), one of the current-generation optical wide surveys. The CNN is currently optimized to recognize lenses with Einstein radii $\gtrsim 1.4$ arcsec, about twice the $r$-band seeing in KiDS. In a sample of $21789$ colour-magnitude selected Luminous Red Galaxies (LRG), of which three are known lenses, the CNN retrieves 761 strong-lens candidates and correctly classifies two out of three of the known lenses. The misclassified lens has an Einstein radius below the range on which the algorithm is trained. We down-select the most reliable 56 candidates by a joint visual inspection. This final sample is presented and discussed. A conservative estimate based on our results shows that with our proposed method it should be possible to find $\sim100$ massive LRG-galaxy lenses at $z\lsim 0.4$ in KiDS when completed. In the most optimistic scenario this number can grow considerably (to maximally $\sim$2400 lenses), when widening the colour-magnitude selection and training the CNN to recognize smaller image-separation lens systems.
  • We present measurements of the weak gravitational lensing shear power spectrum based on $450$ sq. deg. of imaging data from the Kilo Degree Survey. We employ a quadratic estimator in two and three redshift bins and extract band powers of redshift auto-correlation and cross-correlation spectra in the multipole range $76 \leq \ell \leq 1310$. The cosmological interpretation of the measured shear power spectra is performed in a Bayesian framework assuming a $\Lambda$CDM model with spatially flat geometry, while accounting for small residual uncertainties in the shear calibration and redshift distributions as well as marginalising over intrinsic alignments, baryon feedback and an excess-noise power model. Moreover, massive neutrinos are included in the modelling. The cosmological main result is expressed in terms of the parameter combination $S_8 \equiv \sigma_8 \sqrt{\Omega_{\rm m}/0.3}$ yielding $S_8 = \ 0.651 \pm 0.058$ (3 z-bins), confirming the recently reported tension in this parameter with constraints from Planck at $3.2\sigma$ (3 z-bins). We cross-check the results of the 3 z-bin analysis with the weaker constraints from the 2 z-bin analysis and find them to be consistent. The high-level data products of this analysis, such as the band power measurements, covariance matrices, redshift distributions, and likelihood evaluation chains are available at http://kids.strw.leidenuniv.nl/
  • The Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) is an ongoing optical wide-field imaging survey with the OmegaCAM camera at the VLT Survey Telescope. It aims to image 1500 square degrees in four filters (ugri). The core science driver is mapping the large-scale matter distribution in the Universe, using weak lensing shear and photometric redshift measurements. Further science cases include galaxy evolution, Milky Way structure, detection of high-redshift clusters, and finding rare sources such as strong lenses and quasars. Here we present the third public data release (DR3) and several associated data products, adding further area, homogenized photometric calibration, photometric redshifts and weak lensing shear measurements to the first two releases. A dedicated pipeline embedded in the Astro-WISE information system is used for the production of the main release. Modifications with respect to earlier releases are described in detail. Photometric redshifts have been derived using both Bayesian template fitting, and machine-learning techniques. For the weak lensing measurements, optimized procedures based on the THELI data reduction and lensfit shear measurement packages are used. In DR3 stacked ugri images, weight maps, masks, and source lists for 292 new survey tiles (~300 sq.deg) are made available. The multi-band catalogue, including homogenized photometry and photometric redshifts, covers the combined DR1, DR2 and DR3 footprint of 440 survey tiles (447 sq.deg). Limiting magnitudes are typically 24.3, 25.1, 24.9, 23.8 (5 sigma in a 2 arcsec aperture) in ugri, respectively, and the typical r-band PSF size is less than 0.7 arcsec. The photometric homogenization scheme ensures accurate colors and an absolute calibration stable to ~2% for gri and ~3% in u. Separately released are a weak lensing shear catalogue and photometric redshifts based on two different machine-learning techniques.
  • We present cosmological parameter constraints from a tomographic weak gravitational lensing analysis of ~450deg$^2$ of imaging data from the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS). For a flat $\Lambda$CDM cosmology with a prior on $H_0$ that encompasses the most recent direct measurements, we find $S_8\equiv\sigma_8\sqrt{\Omega_{\rm m}/0.3}=0.745\pm0.039$. This result is in good agreement with other low redshift probes of large scale structure, including recent cosmic shear results, along with pre-Planck cosmic microwave background constraints. A $2.3$-$\sigma$ tension in $S_8$ and `substantial discordance' in the full parameter space is found with respect to the Planck 2015 results. We use shear measurements for nearly 15 million galaxies, determined with a new improved `self-calibrating' version of $lens$fit validated using an extensive suite of image simulations. Four-band $ugri$ photometric redshifts are calibrated directly with deep spectroscopic surveys. The redshift calibration is confirmed using two independent techniques based on angular cross-correlations and the properties of the photometric redshift probability distributions. Our covariance matrix is determined using an analytical approach, verified numerically with large mock galaxy catalogues. We account for uncertainties in the modelling of intrinsic galaxy alignments and the impact of baryon feedback on the shape of the non-linear matter power spectrum, in addition to the small residual uncertainties in the shear and redshift calibration. The cosmology analysis was performed blind. Our high-level data products, including shear correlation functions, covariance matrices, redshift distributions, and Monte Carlo Markov Chains are available at http://kids.strw.leidenuniv.nl.
  • Hollow carbon spheres (HCS) covered with metal oxide nanoparticles (SnO2 and MnO2, respectively) were successfully synthesized and investigated regarding their potential as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. Raman spectroscopy shows a high degree of graphitization for the HCS host structure. The mesoporous nature of the nanocomposites is confirmed by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis. For both metal oxides under study, the metal oxide functionalization of HCS yields a significant increase of electrochemical performance. The charge capacity of HCS/SnO2 is 370 mAh/g after 45 cycles (266 mAh/g in HCS/MnO2) which clearly exceeds the value of 188 mAh/g in pristine HCS. Remarkably, the data imply excellent long term cycling stability after 100 cycles in both cases. The results hence show that mesoporous HCS/metal oxide nanocomposites enable exploiting the potential of metal oxide anode materials in Lithium-ion batteries by providing a HCS host structure which is both conductive and stable enough to accommodate big volume change effects.
  • We present measurements of the galaxy bias $b$ and the galaxy-matter cross-correlation coefficient $r$ for the BOSS LOWZ luminous red galaxy sample. Using a new statistical weak lensing analysis of the Red Sequence Cluster Lensing Survey (RCSLenS) we find the bias properties of this sample to be higher than previously reported with $b=2.45^{+0.05}_{-0.05}$ and $r=1.64^{+0.17}_{-0.16}$ on scales between $3'$ and $20'$. We repeat the measurement for angular scales of $20'\leq \vartheta \leq70'$, which yields $b=2.39^{+0.07}_{-0.07}$ and $r=1.24^{+0.26}_{-0.25}$. This is the first application of a data compression analysis using a complete set of discrete estimators for galaxy-galaxy lensing and galaxy clustering. As cosmological data sets grow, our new method of data compression will become increasingly important in order to interpret joint weak lensing and galaxy clustering measurements and to estimate the data covariance. In future studies this formalism can be used as a tool to study the large-scale structure of the Universe to yield a precise determination of cosmological parameters.
  • The Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) is an optical wide-field survey designed to map the matter distribution in the Universe using weak gravitational lensing. In this paper, we use these data to measure the density profiles and masses of a sample of $\sim \mathrm{1400}$ spectroscopically identified galaxy groups and clusters from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. We detect a highly significant signal (signal-to-noise-ratio $\sim$ 120), allowing us to study the properties of dark matter haloes over one and a half order of magnitude in mass, from $M \sim 10^{13}-10^{14.5} h^{-1}\mathrm{M_{\odot}}$. We interpret the results for various subsamples of groups using a halo model framework which accounts for the mis-centring of the Brightest Cluster Galaxy (used as the tracer of the group centre) with respect to the centre of the group's dark matter halo. We find that the density profiles of the haloes are well described by an NFW profile with concentrations that agree with predictions from numerical simulations. In addition, we constrain scaling relations between the mass and a number of observable group properties. We find that the mass scales with the total r-band luminosity as a power-law with slope $1.16 \pm 0.13$ (1-sigma) and with the group velocity dispersion as a power-law with slope $1.89 \pm 0.27$ (1-sigma). Finally, we demonstrate the potential of weak lensing studies of groups to discriminate between models of baryonic feedback at group scales by comparing our results with the predictions from the Cosmo-OverWhelmingly Large Simulations (Cosmo-OWLS) project, ruling out models without AGN feedback.
  • Finding a sample of the most massive clusters with redshifts $z>0.6$ can provide an interesting consistency check of the $\Lambda$ cold dark matter ($\Lambda$CDM) model. Here we present results from our search for clusters with $0.6\lesssim z\lesssim1.0$ where the initial candidates were selected by cross-correlating the RASS faint and bright source catalogues with red galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR8. Our survey thus covers $\approx10,000\,\rm{deg^2}$, much larger than previous studies of this kind. Deeper follow-up observations in three bands using the William Herschel Telescope and the Large Binocular Telescope were performed to confirm the candidates, resulting in a sample of 44 clusters for which we present richnesses and red sequence redshifts, as well as spectroscopic redshifts for a subset. At least two of the clusters in our sample are comparable in richness to RCS2-$J$232727.7$-$020437, one of the richest systems discovered to date. We also obtained new observations with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy for a subsample of 21 clusters. For 11 of those we detect the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect signature. The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signal allows us to estimate $M_{200}$ and check for tension with the cosmological standard model. We find no tension between our cluster masses and the $\Lambda$CDM model.
  • The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is the most ambitious radio telescope ever planned. With a collecting area of about a square kilometre, the SKA will be far superior in sensitivity and observing speed to all current radio facilities. The scientific capability promised by the SKA and its technological challenges provide an ideal base for interdisciplinary research, technology transfer, and collaboration between universities, research centres and industry. The SKA in the radio regime and the European Extreme Large Telescope (E-ELT) in the optical band are on the roadmap of the European Strategy Forum for Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) and have been recognised as the essential facilities for European research in astronomy. This "White Paper" outlines the German science and R&D interests in the SKA project and will provide the basis for future funding applications to secure German involvement in the Square Kilometre Array.
  • We present the first direct measurement of the galaxy-matter bispectrum as a function of galaxy luminosity, stellar mass, and SED type. Our analysis uses a galaxy-galaxy-galaxy lensing technique (G3L), on angular scales between 9 arcsec to 50 arcmin, to quantify (i) the excess surface mass density around galaxy pairs (excess mass hereafter) and (ii) the excess shear-shear correlations around single galaxies, both of which yield a measure of two types of galaxy-matter bispectra. We apply our method to the state-of-the-art Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS), spanning 154 square degrees. This survey allows us to detect a significant change of the bispectra with lens properties. Measurements for lens populations with distinct redshift distributions become comparable by a newly devised normalisation technique. That will also aid future comparisons to other surveys or simulations. A significant dependence of the normalised G3L statistics on luminosity within -23<M_r<-18 and stellar mass within 5x10^9 M_sol<M_star<2x10^11 M_sol is found (h=0.73). Both bispectra exhibit a stronger signal for more luminous lenses or those with higher stellar mass (up to a factor 2-3). This is accompanied by a steeper equilateral bispectrum for more luminous or higher stellar mass lenses for the excess mass. Importantly, we find the excess mass to be very sensitive to galaxy type as recently predicted with semi-analytic galaxy models: luminous (M_r<-21) late-type galaxies show no detectable signal, while all excess mass detected for luminous galaxies seems to be associated with early-type galaxies. We also present the first observational constraints on third-order stochastic galaxy biasing parameters.
  • Measuring the relative mass contributions of luminous and dark matter in spiral galaxies is important for understanding their formation and evolution. The combination of a galaxy rotation curve and strong lensing is a powerful way to break the disk-halo degeneracy that is inherent in each of the methods individually. We present an analysis of the 10-image radio spiral lens B1933+503 at z_l=0.755, incorporating (1) new global VLBI observations, (2) new adaptive-optics assisted K-band imaging, (3) new spectroscopic observations for the lens galaxy rotation curve and the source redshift. We construct a three-dimensionally axisymmetric mass distribution with 3 components: an exponential profile for the disk, a point mass for the bulge, and an NFW profile for the halo. The mass model is simultaneously fitted to the kinematics and the lensing data. The NFW halo needs to be oblate with a flattening of a/c=0.33^{+0.07}_{-0.05} to be consistent with the radio data. This suggests that baryons are effective at making the halos oblate near the center. The lensing and kinematics analysis probe the inner ~10 kpc of the galaxy, and we obtain a lower limit on the halo scale radius of 16 kpc (95% CI). The dark matter mass fraction inside a sphere with a radius of 2.2 disk scale lengths is f_{DM,2.2}=0.43^{+0.10}_{-0.09}. The contribution of the disk to the total circular velocity at 2.2 disk scale lengths is 0.76^{+0.05}_{-0.06}, suggesting that the disk is marginally submaximal. The stellar mass of the disk from our modeling is log_{10}(M_{*}/M_{sun}) = 11.06^{+0.09}_{-0.11} assuming that the cold gas contributes ~20% to the total disk mass. In comparison to the stellar masses estimated from stellar population synthesis models, the stellar initial mass function of Chabrier is preferred to that of Salpeter by a probability factor of 7.2.
  • R. Laureijs, J. Amiaux, S. Arduini, J.-L. Auguères, J. Brinchmann, R. Cole, M. Cropper, C. Dabin, L. Duvet, A. Ealet, B. Garilli, P. Gondoin, L. Guzzo, J. Hoar, H. Hoekstra, R. Holmes, T. Kitching, T. Maciaszek, Y. Mellier, F. Pasian, W. Percival, J. Rhodes, G. Saavedra Criado, M. Sauvage, R. Scaramella, L. Valenziano, S. Warren, R. Bender, F. Castander, A. Cimatti, O. Le Fèvre, H. Kurki-Suonio, M. Levi, P. Lilje, G. Meylan, R. Nichol, K. Pedersen, V. Popa, R. Rebolo Lopez, H.-W. Rix, H. Rottgering, W. Zeilinger, F. Grupp, P. Hudelot, R. Massey, M. Meneghetti, L. Miller, S. Paltani, S. Paulin-Henriksson, S. Pires, C. Saxton, T. Schrabback, G. Seidel, J. Walsh, N. Aghanim, L. Amendola, J. Bartlett, C. Baccigalupi, J.-P. Beaulieu, K. Benabed, J.-G. Cuby, D. Elbaz, P. Fosalba, G. Gavazzi, A. Helmi, I. Hook, M. Irwin, J.-P. Kneib, M. Kunz, F. Mannucci, L. Moscardini, C. Tao, R. Teyssier, J. Weller, G. Zamorani, M.R. Zapatero Osorio, O. Boulade, J. J. Foumond, A. Di Giorgio, P. Guttridge, A. James, M. Kemp, J. Martignac, A. Spencer, D. Walton, T. Blümchen, C. Bonoli, F. Bortoletto, C. Cerna, L. Corcione, C. Fabron, K. Jahnke, S. Ligori, F. Madrid, L. Martin, G. Morgante, T. Pamplona, E. Prieto, M. Riva, R. Toledo, M. Trifoglio, F. Zerbi, F. Abdalla, M. Douspis, C. Grenet, S. Borgani, R. Bouwens, F. Courbin, J.-M. Delouis, P. Dubath, A. Fontana, M. Frailis, A. Grazian, J. Koppenhöfer, O. Mansutti, M. Melchior, M. Mignoli, J. Mohr, C. Neissner, K. Noddle, M. Poncet, M. Scodeggio, S. Serrano, N. Shane, J.-L. Starck, C. Surace, A. Taylor, G. Verdoes-Kleijn, C. Vuerli, O. R. Williams, A. Zacchei, B. Altieri, I. Escudero Sanz, R. Kohley, T. Oosterbroek, P. Astier, D. Bacon, S. Bardelli, C. Baugh, F. Bellagamba, C. Benoist, D. Bianchi, A. Biviano, E. Branchini, C. Carbone, V. Cardone, D. Clements, S. Colombi, C. Conselice, G. Cresci, N. Deacon, J. Dunlop, C. Fedeli, F. Fontanot, P. Franzetti, C. Giocoli, J. Garcia-Bellido, J. Gow, A. Heavens, P. Hewett, C. Heymans, A. Holland, Z. Huang, O. Ilbert, B. Joachimi, E. Jennins, E. Kerins, A. Kiessling, D. Kirk, R. Kotak, O. Krause, O. Lahav, F. van Leeuwen, J. Lesgourgues, M. Lombardi, M. Magliocchetti, K. Maguire, E. Majerotto, R. Maoli, F. Marulli, S. Maurogordato, H. McCracken, R. McLure, A. Melchiorri, A. Merson, M. Moresco, M. Nonino, P. Norberg, J. Peacock, R. Pello, M. Penny, V. Pettorino, C. Di Porto, L. Pozzetti, C. Quercellini, M. Radovich, A. Rassat, N. Roche, S. Ronayette, E. Rossetti, B. Sartoris, P. Schneider, E. Semboloni, S. Serjeant, F. Simpson, C. Skordis, G. Smadja, S. Smartt, P. Spano, S. Spiro, M. Sullivan, A. Tilquin, R. Trotta, L. Verde, Y. Wang, G. Williger, G. Zhao, J. Zoubian, E. Zucca
    Oct. 14, 2011 astro-ph.CO, astro-ph.GA
    Euclid is a space-based survey mission from the European Space Agency designed to understand the origin of the Universe's accelerating expansion. It will use cosmological probes to investigate the nature of dark energy, dark matter and gravity by tracking their observational signatures on the geometry of the universe and on the cosmic history of structure formation. The mission is optimised for two independent primary cosmological probes: Weak gravitational Lensing (WL) and Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAO). The Euclid payload consists of a 1.2 m Korsch telescope designed to provide a large field of view. It carries two instruments with a common field-of-view of ~0.54 deg2: the visual imager (VIS) and the near infrared instrument (NISP) which contains a slitless spectrometer and a three bands photometer. The Euclid wide survey will cover 15,000 deg2 of the extragalactic sky and is complemented by two 20 deg2 deep fields. For WL, Euclid measures the shapes of 30-40 resolved galaxies per arcmin2 in one broad visible R+I+Z band (550-920 nm). The photometric redshifts for these galaxies reach a precision of dz/(1+z) < 0.05. They are derived from three additional Euclid NIR bands (Y, J, H in the range 0.92-2.0 micron), complemented by ground based photometry in visible bands derived from public data or through engaged collaborations. The BAO are determined from a spectroscopic survey with a redshift accuracy dz/(1+z) =0.001. The slitless spectrometer, with spectral resolution ~250, predominantly detects Ha emission line galaxies. Euclid is a Medium Class mission of the ESA Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme, with a foreseen launch date in 2019. This report (also known as the Euclid Red Book) describes the outcome of the Phase A study.
  • Context: Understanding the evolution of the dark matter halos of galaxies after they become part of a cluster is essential for understanding the evolution of these satellite galaxies. Aims: We investigate the potential of galaxy-galaxy lensing to map the halo density profiles of galaxies in clusters. Methods: We propose a method that separates the weak-lensing signal of the dark-matter halos of galaxies in clusters from the weak-lensing signal of the cluster's main halo. Using toy cluster models as well as ray-tracing through N-body simulations of structure formation along with semi-analytic galaxy formation models, we test the method and assess its performance. Results: We show that with the proposed method, one can recover the density profiles of the cluster galaxy halos in the range 30 - 300 kpc. Using the method, we find that weak-lensing signal of cluster member galaxies in the Millennium Simulation is well described by an Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile. In contrast, non-singular isothermal mass distribution (like PIEMD) model provide a poor fit. Furthermore, we do not find evidence for a sharp truncation of the galaxy halos in the range probed by our method. Instead, there is an observed overall decrease of the halo mass profile of cluster member galaxies with increasing time spent in the cluster. This trend, as well as the presence or absence of a truncation radius, should be detectable in future weak-lensing surveys like the Dark Energy Survey (DES) or the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) survey. Such surveys should also allow one to infer the mass-luminosity relation of cluster galaxies with our method over two decades in mass. Conclusions: It is possible to recover in a non-parametric way the mass profile of satellite galaxies and their dark matter halos in future surveys, using our proposed weak lensing method.
  • (abridged) We study the validity of the approximation of a Gaussian cosmic shear likelihood. We estimate the true likelihood for a fiducial cosmological model from a large set of ray-tracing simulations and investigate the impact of non-Gaussianity on cosmological parameter estimation. We investigate how odd the recently reported very low value of $\sigma_8$ really is as derived from the \textit{Chandra} Deep Field South (CDFS) using cosmic shear by taking the non-Gaussianity of the likelihood into account as well as the possibility of biases coming from the way the CDFS was selected. We find that the cosmic shear likelihood is significantly non-Gaussian. This leads to both a shift of the maximum of the posterior distribution and a significantly smaller credible region compared to the Gaussian case. We re-analyse the CDFS cosmic shear data using the non-Gaussian likelihood. Assuming that the CDFS is a random pointing, we find $\sigma_8=0.68_{-0.16}^{+0.09}$ for fixed $\Omega_{\rm m}=0.25$. In a WMAP5-like cosmology, a value equal to or lower than this would be expected in $\approx 5%$ of the times. Taking biases into account arising from the way the CDFS was selected, which we model as being dependent on the number of haloes in the CDFS, we obtain $\sigma_8 = 0.71^{+0.10}_{-0.15}$. Combining the CDFS data with the parameter constraints from WMAP5 yields $\Omega_{\rm m} = 0.26^{+0.03}_{-0.02}$ and $\sigma_8 = 0.79^{+0.04}_{-0.03}$ for a flat universe.
  • Weak gravitational lensing is one of the most promising tools to investigate the equation-of-state of dark energy. In order to obtain reliable parameter estimations for current and future experiments, a good theoretical understanding of dark matter clustering is essential. Of particular interest is the statistical precision to which weak lensing observables, such as cosmic shear correlation functions, can be determined. We construct a fitting formula for the non-Gaussian part of the covariance of the lensing power spectrum. The Gaussian contribution to the covariance, which is proportional to the lensing power spectrum squared, and optionally shape noise can be included easily by adding their contributions. Starting from a canonical estimator for the dimensionless lensing power spectrum, we model first the covariance in the halo model approach including all four halo terms for one fiducial cosmology and then fit two polynomials to the expression found. On large scales, we use a first-order polynomial in the wave-numbers and dimensionless power spectra that goes asymptotically towards $1.1 C_{pt}$ for $\ell \to 0$, i.e., the result for the non-Gaussian part of the covariance using tree-level perturbation theory. On the other hand, for small scales we employ a second-order polynomial in the dimensionless power spectra for the fit. We obtain a fitting formula for the non-Gaussian contribution of the convergence power spectrum covariance that is accurate to 10% for the off-diagonal elements, and to 5% for the diagonal elements, in the range $50 \lesssim \ell \lesssim 5000$ and can be used for single source redshifts $z_{s} \in [0.5,2.0]$ in WMAP5-like cosmologies.
  • This paper studies the relative spatial distribution of red-sequence and blue-cloud galaxies, and their relation to the dark matter distribution in the COMBO-17 survey as function of scale down to z~1. We measure the 2nd-order auto- and cross-correlation functions of galaxy clustering and express the relative biasing by using aperture statistics. Also estimated is the relation between the galaxies and the dark matter distribution exploiting galaxy-galaxy lensing (GGL). All observables are further interpreted in terms of a halo model. To fully explain the galaxy clustering cross-correlation function with a halo model, we need to introduce a new parameter,R, that describes the statistical relation between numbers of red and blue galaxies within the same halo. We find that red and blue galaxies are clearly differently clustered, a significant evolution of the relative clustering with redshift was not found. There is evidence for a scale-dependence of relative biasing. The relative clustering, the GGL and, with some tension, the galaxy numbers can be explained consistently within a halo model. For the cross-correlation function one requires a HOD variance that becomes Poisson even for relatively small occupancy numbers. For our sample, this rules out with high confidence a "Poisson satellite" scenario as found in semi-analytical models. Red galaxies have to be concentrated towards the halo centre, either by a central red galaxy or by a concentration parameter above that for dark matter.The value of R depends on the presence or absence of central galaxies: If no central galaxies or only red central galaxies are allowed, R is consistent with zero, whereas a positive correlation $R=+0.5\pm0.2$ is needed if both blue and red galaxies can have central galaxies.[ABRIDGED]
  • (abridged) We study the accuracy of various approximations to cosmic shear and weak galaxy-galaxy lensing and investigate effects of Born corrections and lens-lens coupling. We use ray-tracing through the Millennium Simulation to calculate various cosmic-shear and galaxy-galaxy-lensing statistics. We compare the results from ray-tracing to semi-analytic predictions. We find: (i) The linear approximation provides an excellent fit to cosmic-shear power spectra as long as the actual matter power spectrum is used as input. Common fitting formulae, however, strongly underestimate the cosmic-shear power spectra. Halo models provide a better fit to cosmic shear-power spectra, but there are still noticeable deviations. (ii) Cosmic-shear B-modes induced by Born corrections and lens-lens coupling are at least three orders of magnitude smaller than cosmic-shear E-modes. Semi-analytic extensions to the linear approximation predict the right order of magnitude for the B-mode. Compared to the ray-tracing results, however, the semi-analytic predictions may differ by a factor two on small scales and also show a different scale dependence. (iii) The linear approximation may under- or overestimate the galaxy-galaxy-lensing shear signal by several percent due to the neglect of magnification bias, which may lead to a correlation between the shear and the observed number density of lenses. We conclude: (i) Current semi-analytic models need to be improved in order to match the degree of statistical accuracy expected for future weak-lensing surveys. (ii) Shear B-modes induced by corrections to the linear approximation are not important for future cosmic-shear surveys. (iii) Magnification bias can be important for galaxy-galaxy-lensing surveys.
  • We present the CFHTLS-Archive-Research Survey (CARS). It is a virtual multi-colour survey based on public archive images from the CFHT-Legacy-Survey. Our main scientific interests in CARS are optical searches for galaxy clusters from low to high redshift and their subsequent study with photometric and weak-gravitational lensing techniques. As a first step of the project we present multi-colour catalogues from 37 sq. degrees of the CFHTLS-Wide component. Our aims are to create astrometrically and photometrically well calibrated co-added images. Second goal are five-band (u*, g', r', i', z') multi-band catalogues with an emphasis on reliable estimates for object colours. These are subsequently used for photometric redshift estimates. The article explains in detail data processing, multi-colour catalogue creation and photometric redshift estimation. Furthermore we apply a novel technique, based on studies of the angular galaxy cross-correlation function, to quantify the reliability of photo-z's. The accuracy of our high-confidence photo-z sample (10-15 galaxies per sq. arcmin) is estimated to $\sigma_{\Delta_z/(1+z)}\approx 0.04-0.05$ up to i'<24 with typically only 1-3% outliers. Interested users can obtain access to our data by request to the authors.
  • In recent years cosmic shear, the weak gravitational lensing effect by the large-scale structure of the Universe, has proven to be one of the observational pillars on which the cosmological concordance model is founded. Several cosmic shear statistics have been developed in order to analyze data from surveys. For the covariances of the prevalent second-order measures we present simple and handy formulae, valid under the assumptions of Gaussian density fluctuations and a simple survey geometry. We also formulate these results in the context of shear tomography, i.e. the inclusion of redshift information, and generalize them to arbitrary data field geometries. We define estimators for the E- and B-mode projected power spectra and show them to be unbiased in the case of Gaussianity and a simple survey geometry. From the covariance of these estimators we demonstrate how to derive covariances of arbitrary combinations of second-order cosmic shear measures. We then recalculate the power spectrum covariance for general survey geometries and examine the bias thereby introduced on the estimators for exemplary configurations. Our results for the covariances are considerably simpler than and analytically shown to be equivalent to the real-space approach presented in the first paper of this series. We find good agreement with other numerical evaluations and confirm the general properties of the covariance matrices. The studies of the specific survey configurations suggest that our simplified covariances may be employed for realistic survey geometries to good approximation.
  • Functional aspects as well as the influence of integration technology on the system behavior have to be considered in the 3D integration design process of micro systems. Therefore, information from different physical domains has to be provided to designers. Due to the variety of structures and effects of different physical domains, efficient modeling approaches and simulation algorithms have to be combined. The paper describes a modular approach which covers detailed analysis with PDE solvers and model generation for system level simulation.
  • High resolution HST/ACS images of the galaxy cluster RX J1347-1145 have enabled us to identify several new multiple image candidates in the cluster, including a 5 image system with a central image. The multiple images allow us to construct an accurate 2-dimensional mass map of the central part of the cluster. The modelling of the cluster mass includes the most prominent cluster galaxies modelled as truncated isothermal spheres and a smooth halo component that is described with 2 parametric profiles. The mass reconstruction is done using a Markov chain Monte Carlo method that provides us with a total projected mass density as well as estimates for the parameters of interest and their respective errors. The mass profile is in reasonable agreement with previous mass estimates based on the X-ray emission from the hot intra-cluster gas, however the X-ray mass estimates are systematically lower than what we obtain with gravitational lensing.
  • The weak gravitational lensing effect, small coherent distortions of galaxy images by means of a gravitational tidal field, can be used to study the relation between the matter and galaxy distribution. In this context, weak lensing has so far only been used for considering a second-order correlation function that relates the matter density and galaxy number density as a function of separation. We implement two new, third-order correlation functions that have recently been suggested in the literature, and apply them to the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey. We demonstrate that it is possible, even with already existing data, to make significant measurements of third-order lensing correlations. We develop an optimised computer code for the correlation functions. To test its reliability a set of tests are performed. The correlation functions are transformed to aperture statistics, which allow easy tests for remaining systematics in the data. In order to further verify the robustness of our measurement, the signal is shown to vanish when randomising the source ellipticities. Finally, the lensing signal is compared to crude predictions based on the halo-model. On angular scales between roughly 1 arcmin and 11 arcmin a significant third-order correlation between two lens positions and one source ellipticity is found. We discuss this correlation function as a novel tool to study the average matter environment of pairs of galaxies. Correlating two source ellipticities and one lens position yields a less significant but nevertheless detectable signal on a scale of 4 arcmin. Both signals lie roughly within the range expected by theory which supports their cosmological origin.[ABRIDGED]
  • We introduce an optimized data vector of cosmic shear measures (N). This data vector has high information content, is not sensitive against B-mode contamination and only shows small correlation between data points of different angular scales. We show that a data vector of the two-point correlation function (2PCF) in general contains more information on cosmological parameters compared to a data vector of the aperture mass dispersion. Reason for this is the fact that <M_ap^2> lacks the information of the convergence power spectrum (P_\kappa) on large angular scales, which is contained in the 2PCF data vector. Therefore we create a combined data vector N, which retains the advantages of <M_ap^2> and in addition is also sensitive to the large-scale information of P_\kappa. We compare the information content of the three data vectors by performing a detailed likelihood analysis and use ray-tracing simulations to derive the covariance matrices. In the last part of the paper we contaminate all data vectors with B-modes on small angular scales and examine their robustness against this contamination.The combined data vector strongly improves constraints on cosmological parameters compared to <M_ap^2>. Although, in case of a pure E-mode signal the information content of the 2PCF is higher, in the more realistic case where B-modes are present the 2PCF data vector is strongly contaminated and yields biased cosmological parameter estimates. N shows to be robust against this contamination. Furthermore the individual data points of N show a much smaller correlation compared to the 2PCF leading to an almost diagonal covariance matrix.
  • The mass function of galaxy clusters is an important cosmological probe. Differences in the selection method could potentially lead to biases when determining the mass function. From the optical and X-ray data of the XMM-Newton Follow-Up Survey, we obtained a sample of galaxy cluster candidates using weak gravitational lensing, the optical Postman matched filter method, and a search for extended X-ray sources. We developed our weak-lensing search criteria by testing the performance of the aperture mass statistic on realistic ray-tracing simulations matching our survey parameters and by comparing two filter functions. We find that the dominant noise source for our survey is shape noise at almost all significance levels and that spurious cluster detections due to projections of large-scale structures are negligible, except possibly for highly significantly detected peaks. Our full cluster catalog has 155 cluster candidates, 116 found with the Postman matched filter, 59 extended X-ray sources, and 31 shear selected potential clusters. Most of these cluster candidates were not previously known. The present catalog will be a solid foundation for studying possible selection effects in either method.