• H. Aihara, N. Arimoto, R. Armstrong, S. Arnouts, N. A. Bahcall, S. Bickerton, J. Bosch, K. Bundy, P. L. Capak, J. H. H. Chan, M. Chiba, J. Coupon, E. Egami, M. Enoki, F. Finet, H. Fujimori, S. Fujimoto, H. Furusawa, J. Furusawa, T. Goto, A. Goulding, J. P. Greco, J. E. Greene, J. E. Gunn, T. Hamana, Y. Harikane, Y. Hashimoto, T. Hattori, M. Hayashi, Y. Hayashi, K. G. Hełminiak, R. Higuchi, C. Hikage, P. T. P. Ho, B.-C. Hsieh, K. Huang, S. Huang, H. Ikeda, M. Imanishi, A. K. Inoue, K. Iwasawa, I. Iwata, A. T. Jaelani, H.-Y. Jian, Y. Kamata, H. Karoji, N. Kashikawa, N. Katayama, S. Kawanomoto, I. Kayo, J. Koda, M. Koike, T. Kojima, Y. Komiyama, A. Konno, S. Koshida, Y. Koyama, H. Kusakabe, A. Leauthaud, C.-H. Lee, L. Lin, Y.-T. Lin, R. H. Lupton, R. Mandelbaum, Y. Matsuoka, E. Medezinski, S. Mineo, S. Miyama, H. Miyatake, S. Miyazaki, R. Momose, A. More, S. More, Y. Moritani, T. J. Moriya, T. Morokuma, S. Mukae, R. Murata, H. Murayama, T. Nagao, F. Nakata, M. Niida, H. Niikura, A. J. Nishizawa, Y. Obuchi, M. Oguri, Y. Oishi, N. Okabe, Y. Okura, Y. Ono, M. Onodera, M. Onoue, K. Osato, M. Ouchi, P. A. Price, T.-S. Pyo, M. Sako, S. Okamoto, M. Sawicki, T. Shibuya, K. Shimasaku, A. Shimono, M. Shirasaki, J. D. Silverman, M. Simet, J. Speagle, D. N. Spergel, M. A. Strauss, Y. Sugahara, N. Sugiyama, Y. Suto, S. H. Suyu, N. Suzuki, P. J. Tait, T. Takata, M. Takada, N. Tamura, M. M. Tanaka, M. Tanaka, M. Tanaka, Y. Tanaka, T. Terai, Y. Terashima, Y. Toba, J. Toshikawa, E. L. Turner, T. Uchida, H. Uchiyama, K. Umetsu, F. Uraguchi, Y. Urata, T. Usuda, Y. Utsumi, S.-Y. Wang, W.-H. Wang, K. C. Wong, K. Yabe, Y. Yamada, H. Yamanoi, N. Yasuda, S. Yeh, A. Yonehara, S. Yuma
    March 15, 2018 astro-ph.IM
    Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) is a wide-field imaging camera on the prime focus of the 8.2m Subaru telescope on the summit of Maunakea in Hawaii. A team of scientists from Japan, Taiwan and Princeton University is using HSC to carry out a 300-night multi-band imaging survey of the high-latitude sky. The survey includes three layers: the Wide layer will cover 1400 deg$^2$ in five broad bands ($grizy$), with a $5\,\sigma$ point-source depth of $r \approx 26$. The Deep layer covers a total of 26~deg$^2$ in four fields, going roughly a magnitude fainter, while the UltraDeep layer goes almost a magnitude fainter still in two pointings of HSC (a total of 3.5 deg$^2$). Here we describe the instrument, the science goals of the survey, and the survey strategy and data processing. This paper serves as an introduction to a special issue of the Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan, which includes a large number of technical and scientific papers describing results from the early phases of this survey.
  • The Atacama Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Phasing Project (APP) has developed and deployed the hardware and software necessary to coherently sum the signals of individual ALMA antennas and record the aggregate sum in Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Data Exchange Format. These beamforming capabilities allow the ALMA array to collectively function as the equivalent of a single large aperture and participate in global VLBI arrays. The inclusion of phased ALMA in current VLBI networks operating at (sub)millimeter wavelengths provides an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity, as well as enhancements in u-v coverage and north-south angular resolution. The availability of a phased ALMA enables a wide range of new ultra-high angular resolution science applications, including the resolution of supermassive black holes on event horizon scales and studies of the launch and collimation of astrophysical jets. It also provides a high-sensitivity aperture that may be used for investigations such as pulsar searches at high frequencies. This paper provides an overview of the ALMA Phasing System design, implementation, and performance characteristics.
  • We present observations of CO(3-2) and $^{13}$CO(3-2) emission near the supernebula in the dwarf galaxy NGC 5253, which contains one of the best examples of a potential globular cluster in formation. The 0.3" resolution images reveal an unusual molecular cloud, "Cloud D1", coincident with the radio-infrared supernebula. The ~6-pc diameter cloud has a linewidth, $\Delta$ v = 21.7 km/s, that reflects only the gravitational potential of the star cluster residing within it. The corresponding virial mass is 2.5 x 10$^5$ M$_\odot$. The cluster appears to have a top-heavy initial mass function, with $M_{low}$~1-2 M$_\odot$. Cloud D1 is optically thin in CO(3-2) probably because the gas is hot. Molecular gas mass is very uncertain but constitutes < 35% of the dynamical mass within the cloud boundaries. In spite of the presence of an estimated ~1500-2000 O stars within the small cloud, the CO appears relatively undisturbed. We propose that Cloud D1 consists of molecular clumps or cores, possibly star-forming, orbiting with more evolved stars in the core of the giant cluster.
  • This White Paper details the intentions and plans of the East Asian Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) community for pushing the frontiers of millimeter/submillimeter VLBI. To this end, we shall endeavor to actively promote coordinated efforts in the East Asia region. Our goal is to establish firm collaborations among the East Asia VLBI community in partnership with related institutes in North America and Europe and to expand existing global mm/submm VLBI arrays for (a) exploring the vicinity of black holes with an ultimate angular resolution down to 1~R$_{S}$ (Schwarzschild radius) and (b) investigating the dynamics of circumstellar gas in star-forming regions and late-type stars, and circumnuclear gas around active galactic nuclei (AGNs). In the first half of this White Paper, we highlight scientific accomplishments of the East Asia (EA) VLBI community. Various VLBI research results on M87, Sgr A*, blazars, narrow-line Seyfert~1 galaxies, and compact symmetric objects are described, and future visions of our VLBI science are briefly presented. Maser science of star formation, stellar evolution, and physics of accretion disks around AGNs are also discussed. A new vision for conducting multi-transition maser studies using mm/submm VLBI together with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) is described. In the second half of this White Paper, we describe the EA community's vision for using mm/submm VLBI arrays in the framework or extended version of the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) and the Global Millimeter VLBI Array (GMVA). The accomplishment of the aforementioned goal will maximize the overall scientific outcomes of mm/submm VLBI in the world.
  • [Abridged] We have recently reported on the collapse and fragmentation properties of the northernmost part of this structure, located ~2.4pc north of Orion KL -- the Orion Molecular Cloud 3 (OMC 3, Takahashi et al. 2013). As part of our project to study the integral-shaped filament, we analyze the fragmentation properties of the northern OMC 1 filament. This filament is a dense structure previously identified by JCMT/SCUBA submillimeter continuum and VLA ammonia observations and shown to have fragmented into clumps. We observed OMC1 n with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at 1.3mm and report on our analysis of the continuum data. We discovered 24 new compact sources, ranging in mass from 0.1 to 2.3, in size from 400 to 1300au, and in density from 2.6 x 10^7 to 2.8 x 10^6 cm^{-3}. The masses of these sources are similar to those of the SMA protostars in OMC3, but their typical sizes and densities are lower by a factor of ten. Only 8% of the new sources have infrared counterparts, yet there are five associated CO molecular outflows. These sources are thus likely in the Class 0 evolutionary phase yet it cannot be excluded that some of the sources might still be pre-stellar cores. The spatial analysis of the protostars shows that these are divided into small groups that coincide with previously identified JCMT/SCUBA 850 micron and VLA ammonia clumps, and that these are separated by a quasi-equidistant length of ~30arcmin (0.06pc). This separation is dominated by the Jeans length, and therefore indicates that the main physical process in the filament's evolution was thermal fragmentation. Within the protostellar groups, the typical separation is ~6arcsec (~2500\,au), which is a factor 2-3 smaller than the Jeans length of the parental clumps within which the protostars are embedded. These results point to a hierarchical (2-level) thermal fragmentation process of the OMC1n filament.
  • A local dwarf galaxy, NGC 5253, has a young super star cluster that may provide an example of highly efficient star formation. Here we report the detection and imaging, with the Submillimeter Array, of the J= 3-2 rotational transition of CO at the location of the massive cluster associated with the supernebula. The gas cloud is hot, dense, quiescent, and extremely dusty. Its gas-to-dust ratio is lower than the Galactic value, which we attribute to dust enrichment by Wolf-Rayet stars within the embedded star cluster. Its star formation efficiency exceeds 50%, ten times higher than clouds in the Milky Way: this cloud is a factory of stars and soot. We suggest that high efficiency results from the force-feeding of star formation by a streamer of gas falling into the galaxy.
  • We present the first constraint on Faraday rotation measure (RM) at submillimeter wavelengths for the nucleus of M 87. By fitting the polarization position angles ($\chi$) observed with the SMA at four independent frequencies around $\sim$230 GHz and interpreting the change in $\chi$ as a result of \emph{external} Faraday rotation associated with accretion flow, we determine the rotation measure of the M 87 core to be between $-$7.5$\times$10$^{5}$ and 3.4$\times$10$^{5}$ rad/m$^{2}$. Assuming a density profile of the accretion flow that follows a power-law distribution and a magnetic field that is ordered, radial, and has equipartition strength, the limit on the rotation measure constrains the mass accretion rate $\dot{M}$ to be below 9.2$\times$10$^{-4}$ M$_{\odot}$~yr$^{-1}$ at a distance of 21 Schwarzchild radii from the central black hole. This value is at least two orders of magnitude smaller than the Bondi accretion rate, suggesting significant suppression of the accretion rate in the inner region of the accretion flow. Consequently, our result disfavors the classical \emph{advection dominated accretion flow} (ADAF) and prefers the \emph{adiabatic inflow-outflow solution} (ADIOS) or \emph{convection-dominated accretion flow} (CDAF) for the hot accretion flow in M 87.
  • We present the various science cases for building Band 1 receivers as part of ALMA's ongoing Development Program. We describe the new frequency range for Band 1 of 35-52 GHz, a range chosen to maximize the receiver suite's scientific impact. We first describe two key science drivers: 1) the evolution of grains in protoplanetary disks and debris disks, and 2) molecular gas in galaxies during the era of re-ionization. Studies of these topics with Band 1 receivers will significantly expand ALMA's Level 1 Science Goals. In addition, we describe a host of other exciting continuum and line science cases that require ALMA's high sensitivity and angular resolution. For example, ALMA Band 1 continuum data will probe the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect in galaxy clusters, Very Small Grains and spinning dust, ionized jets from young stars, spatial and flaring studies of Sgr A*, the acceleration sites of solar flares, pulsar wind nebulae, radio supernovae, and X-ray binaries. Furthermore, ALMA Band 1 line data will probe chemical differentiation in cloud cores, complex carbon chain molecules, extragalactic radio recombination lines, masers, magnetic fields through Zeeman effect measurements, molecular outflows from young stars, the co-evolution of star formation and active galactic nuclei, and the molecular content of galaxies at z ~ 3. ALMA provides similar to better sensitivities than the JVLA over 35-50 GHz, with differences increasing with frequency. ALMA's smaller antennas and shorter baselines, greater number of baselines, and single-dish capabilities, however, give it a significant edge for observing extended emission, making wide-field maps (mosaics), or attaining high image fidelity, as required by the described science cases.
  • The transition between the proto-star, Class I, and the pre-main sequence star, Class II, phases is still one of the most uncertain, and important, stages in the knowledge of the process of formation of an individual star, because it is the stage that determines the final mass of the star. We observed the YSO "Holoea", associated with IRAS 05327+3404, which was classified as an object in transition between the Class I and Class II phases with several unusual properties, and appears to be surrounded by large amounts of circumstellar material. We used the SMA and BIMA telescopes at millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths to observe the dust continuum emission and the CO (1-0) and (2-1), HCO+ (1-0) and (3-2), and HCN (1-0) transitions in the region around IRAS 05327+3404. We detected two continuum emission peaks at 1.1-mm: SMM 1, the sub-mm counterpart of IRAS 05327+3404, and SMM 2, ~6 arcsec to the West. The emissions of the three molecules show marked differences. The CO emission near the systemic velocity is filtered out by the telescopes, and CO mostly traces the high-velocity gas. The HCO+ and HCN emissions are more centrally concentrated around the central parts of the region, and show several intensity peaks coincident with the sub-mm continuum peaks. We identify two main molecular outflows: a bipolar outflow in an E-W direction that would be powered by SMM 1 and another one in a NE direction, which we associate with SMM 2. We propose that the SMM sources are probably Class I objects, with SMM 1 in an earlier evolutionary stage.
  • We present a detailed analysis of the spatially and spectrally resolved 12CO J=2-1 and J=3-2 emission lines from the TW Hya circumstellar disk, based on science verification data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA). These lines exhibit substantial emission in their high-velocity wings (with projected velocities out to 2.1 km/s, corresponding to intrinsic orbital velocities >20 km/s) that trace molecular gas as close as 2 AU from the central star. However, we are not able to reproduce the intensity of these wings and the general spatio-kinematic pattern of the lines with simple models for the disk structure and kinematics. Using three-dimensional non-local thermodynamic equilibrium molecular excitation and radiative transfer calculations, we construct some alternative models that successfully account for these features by modifying either (1) the temperature structure of the inner disk (inside the dust-depleted disk cavity; r < 4 AU); (2) the intrinsic (Keplerian) disk velocity field; or (3) the distribution of disk inclination angles (a warp). The latter approach is particularly compelling because a representative warped disk model qualitatively reproduces the observed azimuthal modulation of optical light scattered off the disk surface. In any model scenario, the ALMA data clearly require a substantial molecular gas reservoir located inside the region where dust optical depths are known to be substantially diminished in the TW Hya disk, in agreement with previous studies based on infrared spectroscopy. The results from these updated model prescriptions are discussed in terms of their potential physical origins, which might include dynamical perturbations from a low-mass companion with an orbital separation of a few AU.
  • The interstellar region within the few central parsecs around the super-massive black hole, Sgr A* at the very Galactic center is composed by a number of overlapping molecular structures which are subject to one of the most hostile physical environments in the Galaxy. We present high resolution (4"x3"~0.16x0.11 pc) interferometric observations of CN, 13CN, H2CO, SiO, c-C3H2 and HC3N emission at 1.3 mm towards the central ~4 pc of the Galactic center region. Strong differences are observed in the distribution of the different molecules. The UV resistant species CN, the only species tracing all previously identified circumnuclear disk (CND) structures, is mostly concentrated in optically thick clumps in the rotating filaments around Sgr A*. H2CO emission traces a shell-like structure that we interpret as the expansion of Sgr A East against the 50 km/s and 20 km/s giant molecular clouds (GMCs). We derive isotopic ratios 12C/13C~15-45 across most of the CND region. The densest molecular material, traced by SiO and HC3N, is located in the southern CND. The observed c-C3H2/HC3N ratio observed in the region is more than an order of magnitude lower than in Galactic PDRs. Toward the central region only CN was detected in absorption. Apart from the known narrow line-of-sight absorptions, a 90 km/s wide optically thick spectral feature is observed. We find evidences of an even wider (>100 km/s) absorption feature. Around 70-75% of the gas mass, concentrated in just the 27% densest molecular clumps, is associated with rotating structures and show evidences of association with each of the arcs of ionized gas in the mini-spiral structure. Chemical differentiation has been proven to be a powerful tool to disentangle the many overlapping molecular components in this crowded and heavily obscured region.
  • The GGD27 complex includes the HH 80-81-80N system, which is one of the most powerful molecular outflows associated with a high mass star-forming region observed up to now. This outflow is powered by the star associated with the source IRAS 18162-2048. Here we report the detection of continuum emission at sub-arcsec/arcsec resolution with the Submillimeter Array at 1.36mm and 456microns, respectively. We detected dust emission arising from two compact cores, MM1 and MM2, separated by about 7" (~12000AU in projected distance). MM1 spatially coincides with the powerful thermal radio continuum jet that powers the very extended molecular outflow, while MM2 is associated with the protostar that drives the compact molecular outflow recently found in this region. High angular resolution obervations at 1.36mm show that MM1 is unresolved and that MM2 splits into two subcomponents separated by ~1". The mass of MM1 is about 4Msun and it has a size of <300AU. This is consistent with MM1 being associated with a massive and dense (n(H2)>10^9cm-3) circumstellar dusty disk surrounding a high-mass protostar, which has not developed yet a compact HII region. On the other hand, the masses of the two separate components of MM2 are about 2Msun each. One of these components is a compact core with an intermediate-mass young protostar inside and the other component is probably a pre-stellar core. MM1 is the brigthest source at 1.36mm, while MM2 dominates the emission at 456microns. These are the only (sub)millimeter sources detected in the SMA observations. Hence, it seems that both sources may contribute significantly to the bolometric luminosity of the region. Finally, we argue that the characteristics of these two sources indicate that MM2 is probably in an earlier evolutionary stage than MM1.
  • In the last two decades high resolution (< 5 arcsec) CO observations for ~ 150 galaxies have provided a wealth of information about the molecular gas morphologies in the circumnuclear regions. While in samples of 'normal' galaxies the molecular gas does not seem to peak toward the nuclear regions for about 50% of the galaxies, barred galaxies and mergers show larger concentrations. However, we do not exactly know from an observational point of view how the molecular gas properties of a galaxy evolve as a result of an interaction. Here we present the SMA CO(2-1) B0DEGA (Below 0 DEgree GAlaxies) legacy project in which we are imaging the CO(2-1) line of the circumnuclear regions (1 arcmin) of a large (~ 70) sample of nearby IR-bright spiral galaxies, likely interacting, and that still remained unexplored due to its location in the southern hemisphere. We find different molecular gas morphologies, such as rings, nuclear arms, nuclear bars and asymmetries. We find a centrally peaked concentration in about 85% of the galaxies with typical size scales of about 0.5 - 1 kpc. This might be related to perturbations produced by recent interactions.
  • We present five epochs of VLBI water maser observations around the massive protostar Cepheus A HW2 with 0.4 mas (0.3 AU) resolution. The main goal of these observations was to follow the evolution of the remarkable water maser linear/arcuate structures found in earlier VLBI observations. Comparing the data of our new epochs of observation with those observed five years before, we find that at "large" scales of > 1" (700 AU) the main regions of maser emission persist, implying that both the surrounding medium and the exciting sources of the masers have been relatively stable during that time span. However, at smaller scales of < 0.1" (70 AU) we see large changes in the maser structures, particularly in the expanding arcuate structures R4 and R5. R4 traces a nearly elliptical patchy ring of ~ 70 mas size (50 AU) with expanding motions of ~ 5 mas/yr (15 km/s). This structure is probably driven by the wind of a still unidentified YSO located at the centre of the ring (~ 0.18" south of HW2). On the other hand, the R5 expanding bubble structure (driven by the wind of a previously identified YSO located ~ 0.6" south of HW2) is currently dissipating in the circumstellar medium and losing its previous degree of symmetry, indicating a very short-lived event. In addition, our results reveal, at scales of ~ 1" (700 AU), the simultaneous presence of a relatively slow (~ 10-70 km/s) wide-angle outflow (opening angle of ~ 102 deg, traced by the masers, and the fast (~ 500~km/s) highly collimated radio jet associated with HW2 (opening angle of ~ 18 deg, previously observed with the VLA. This simultaneous presence of a wide-angle outflow and a highly collimated jet associated with a massive protostar is similar to what is found in some low-mass YSOs. The implications of these results in the study of the formation of high-mass stars are discussed.
  • We observed with the VLA, PdBI, and SMA the centimeter and millimeter continuum, N2H+(1-0), and CO(2-1) emission associated with a dusty cloud harboring a nascent cluster with intermediate-mass protostars. At centimeter wavelengths we found a strong source, tracing a UCHII region, at the eastern edge of the dusty cloud, with a shell-like structure, and with the near-infrared counterpart falling in the center of the shell. This is presumably the most massive source of the forming cluster. About 15'' to the west of the UCHII region and well embedded in the dusty cloud, we detected a strong millimeter source, MM1, associated with centimeter and near-infrared emission. MM1 seems to be driving a prominent high-velocity CO bipolar outflow, and is embedded in a ridge of dense gas traced by N2H+. We estimated that MM1 is an intermediate-mass source in the Class 0/I phase. About 15'' to the south of MM1, and still more deeply embedded in the dusty cloud, we detected a compact millimeter source, MM2, with neither centimeter nor near-infrared emission, but with water maser emission. MM2 is associated with a clump of N2H+, whose kinematics reveal a clear velocity gradient and additionally we found signposts of infall motions. MM2, being deeply embedded within the dusty cloud, with an associated water maser but no hints of CO outflow emission, is an intriguing object, presumably of intermediate mass. In conclusion, the UCHII region is found at the border of a dusty cloud which is currently undergoing active star formation. Two intermediate-mass protostars in the dusty cloud seem to have formed after the UCHII region and have different properties related to the outflow phenomenon.
  • We report SMA 335 GHz continuum observations with angular resolution of ~0.''3, together with VLA ammonia observations with ~1'' resolution toward Cep A HW 2. We find that the flattened disk structure of the dust emission observed by Patel et al. is preserved at the 0.''3 scale, showing an elongated structure of ~$0.''6 size (450 AU) peaking on HW 2. In addition, two ammonia cores are observed, one associated with a hot-core previously reported, and an elongated core with a double peak separated by ~1.''3 and with signs of heating at the inner edges of the gas facing HW 2. The double-peaked ammonia structure, as well as the double-peaked CH3CN structure reported previously (and proposed to be two independent hot-cores), surround both the dust emission as well as the double-peaked SO2 disk structure found by Jimenez-Serra et al. All these results argue against the interpretation of the elongated dust-gas structure as due to a chance-superposition of different cores; instead, they imply that it is physically related to the central massive object within a disk-protostar-jet system.
  • Using the Submillimeter Array (SMA) we have imaged for the first time the 321.226 GHz, 10_{29}-9_{36} ortho-H2O maser emission. This is also the first detection of this line in the Cepheus A high-mass star-forming region. The 22.235 GHz, 6_{16}-5_{23} water masers were also observed with the Very Large Array 43 days following the SMA observations. Three of the nine detected submillimeter maser spots are associated with the centimeter masers spatially as well as kinematically, while there are 36 22 GHz maser spots without corresponding submillimeter masers. In the HW2 source, both the 321 GHz and 22 GHz masers occur within the region of ~1'' which includes the disk-jet system, but the position angles of the roughly linear structures traced by the masers indicate that the 321 GHz masers are along the jet while the 22 GHz masers are perpendicular to it. We interpret the submillimeter masers in Cepheus A to be tracing significantly hotter regions (600~2000 K) than the centimeter masers.
  • We present 12CO (J=2-1) observations towards the central region of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 4258 with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). Our interferometric maps show two arm-like elongated components along the major axis of the galaxy, with no strong nuclear concentration. The CO (2-1) morphology and kinematics are similar to previous CO (1-0) results. The velocity field of the components agrees with the general galactic rotation, except for the east elongated component, which shows a significant velocity gradient along the east-west direction. In order to account for the velocity field, we propose the kinematical model where the warped rotating disk is also expanding. The line ratio of CO(2-1)/CO(1-0) reveals that the eastern component with the anomalous velocity gradient appears to be warmer and denser. This is consistent with the gas in this component being closer to the center, being heated by the central activities, and possibly interacted by expanding motions from the nuclear region.
  • We present ~3'' resolution imaging of the z=4.7 QSO BR1202-0725 at 900 micron from the Submillimeter Array. The two submillimeter continuum components are clearly resolved from each other, and the positions are consistent with previous lower frequency images. In addition, we detect [CII] line emission from the northern component. The ratio of [CII] to far-infrared luminosity is 0.04% for the northern component, and an upper limit of < 0.03% is obtained for the southern component. These ratios are similar to the low values found in local ultraluminous galaxies, indicating that the excitation conditions are different from those found in local field galaxies. X-ray emission is detected by Chandra from the southern component at L$_{0.5-2keV}=3\times10^{45}$~erg~s$^{-1}$, and detected at 99.6% confidence from the northern component at L$_{0.5-2keV}\sim3\times10^{44}$erg~s$^{-1}$, supporting the idea that BR1202-0725 is a pair of interacting galaxies at z=4.7 that each harbor an active nucleus.
  • We present a detailed study of molecular gas in the central 10pc of the Galaxy through spectral line observations of four rotation inversion transitions of NH3 made with the VLA. Updated line widths and NH3(1,1) opacities are presented, and temperatures, column densities, and masses are derived. We examine the impact of Sgr A East on molecular material at the Galactic center and find that there is no evidence that the expansion of this shell has moved a significant amount of the 50 km/s GMC. The western streamer, however, shows strong indications that it is composed of material swept-up by the expansion of Sgr A East. Using the mass and kinematics of the western streamer, we calculate an energy of E=(2-9)x10^{51} ergs for the progenitor explosion and conclude that Sgr A East was most likely produced by a single supernova. The temperature structure of molecular gas in the central ~20pc is also analyzed in detail. We find that molecular gas has a ``two-temperature'' structure similar to that measured by Huttemeister et al. (2003a) on larger scales. The largest observed line ratios, however, cannot be understood in terms of a two-temperature model, and most likely result from absorption of NH3(3,3) emission by cool surface layers of clouds. By comparing the observed NH3 (6,6)-to-(3,3) line ratios, we disentangle three distinct molecular features within a projected distance of 2pc from Sgr A*. Gas associated with the highest line ratios shows kinematic signatures of both rotation and expansion. The southern streamer shows no significant velocity gradients and does not appear to be directly associated with either the circumnuclear disk or the nucleus. The paper concludes with a discussion of the line-of-sight arrangement of the main features in the central 10pc.
  • We have mapped the ultracompact HII region, G5.89-0.39, and its molecular surroundings with the Submillimeter Array at 2".8 x 1".8 angular resolution in 1.3 mm continuum, SiO(5-4), and eight other molecular lines. We have resolved for the first time the highly energetic molecular outflow in this region. At this resolution, the outflow is definitely bipolar and appears to originate in a 1.3 mm continuum source. The continuum source peaks in the center of the HII region. The axis of the outflow lines up with a recently discovered O5V star.
  • The DR 21 massive star forming region contains two cometary HII regions, aligned nearly perpendicular to each other on the sky. This offers a unique opportunity to discriminate among models of cometary HII regions. We present hydrogen recombination and ammonia line observations of DR 21 made with the Very Large Array. The velocity of the molecular gas, measured from ammonia emission and absorption lines, is constant to within +/- 1 km/s across the region. However, the radial velocity of the ionized material, measured from hydrogen recombination lines, differs by approximately 9 km/s between the "heads" of the two cometary HII regions and by up to approximately 7 km/s from that of the molecular gas. These findings indicate a supersonic velocity difference between the compact heads of the cometary regions and between each head and the ambient molecular material. This suggests that the observed cometary morphologies are created largely by the motion of wind-blowing, ionizing stars through the molecular cloud, as in a bow shock model.
  • We report the results from recent observations of Sgr A* at short-/sub-millimeter wavelengths made with the partially finished Sub-Millimeter Array (SMA) on Mauna Kea. A total of 25 epochs of observations were carried out over the past 15 months in 2001 March to 2002 May. Noticeable variations in flux density at 1.3 mm were observed showing three ``flares''. The SMA observations suggest that Sgr A* highly increases towards submillimeter wavelengths during a flare suggesting the presence of a break wavelength in spectral index around 3 mm. A cross-correlation of the SMA data at 1 mm with the VLA data at 1 cm show a global delay of $t_{delay} > 3d$, suggesting that sub-millimeter wavelengths tend to peak first. Only marginal day-to-day variations in flux density (2-3 $\sigma$) have been detected at 1.3 mm. No significant flares on a short time scale ($\sim1$ hr) have been observed at 1.3 mm. We also failed to detect significant periodic signals at a level of 5% (3$\sigma$) from Sgr A* in a periodic searching window ranging from 10 min to 2.5 hr. The flares observed at the wavelengths between short-centimeter and sub-millimeter might be a result of collective mass ejections associated with X-ray flares that originate from the inner region of the accretion disk near the supermassive black hole.
  • We present VLBA observations of water maser emission associated with the star-forming region IRAS 21391+5802, which is embedded in a bright rimmed cometary globule in IC1396. The angular resolution of the maps is about 0.8 mas, corresponding to a spatial resolution of about 0.6 AU, at an estimated distance of 750 pc. Proper motions are derived for 10 maser features identified consistently over three epochs, which were separated by intervals of about one month. The masers appear in four groups, which are aligned linearly on the sky, roughly along a northeast-southwest direction, with a total separation of about 520 AU (about 0.7 arcseconds). The 3-D velocities of the masers have a maximum value of about 42 km/s (about 9 AU/yr). The average error on the derived proper motions is about 4 km/s. The overall pattern of proper motions is indicative of a bipolar outflow. Proper motions of the masers in a central cluster, with a projected extent of about 20 AU, show systematic deviations from a radial outflow. However, we find no evidence of Keplerian rotation, as has been claimed elsewhere. A nearly circular loop of masers lies near the middle of the cluster. The radius of this loop is 1 AU and the line-of-sight velocities of the masers in the loop are within 2 km/s of the systemic velocity of the region. These masers presumably exist at the radial distance where significant dust condensation occurs in the outflow emanating from the star.