• The JAXA Hayabusa-2 mission was approved in 2010 and launched on December 3, 2014. The spacecraft will arrive at the near-Earth asteroid 162173 Ryugu in 2018 where it will perform a survey, land and obtain surface material, then depart in Dec 2019 and return to Earth in Dec 2020. We observed Ryugu with the Herschel Space Observatory in Apr 2012 at far-IR thermal wavelengths, supported by several ground-based observations to obtain optical lightcurves. We reanalysed previously published Subaru-COMICS and AKARI-IRC observations and merged them with a Spitzer-IRS data set. In addition, we used a large set of Spitzer-IRAC observations obtained in the period Jan to May, 2013. The data set includes two complete rotational lightcurves and a series of ten "point-and-shoot" observations. The almost spherical shape of the target together with the insufficient lightcurve quality forced us to combine radiometric and lightcurve inversion techniques in different ways to find the object's key physical and thermal parameters. We find that the solution which best matches our data sets leads to this C class asteroid having a retrograde rotation with a spin-axis orientation of (lambda = 310-340 deg; beta = -40+/-15 deg) in ecliptic coordinates, an effective diameter (of an equal-volume sphere) of 850 to 880 m, a geometric albedo of 0.044 to 0.050 and a thermal inertia in the range 150 to 300 Jm-2s-0.5K-1. Based on estimated thermal conductivities of the top-layer surface in the range 0.1 to 0.6 WK-1m-1, we calculated that the grain sizes are approximately equal to between 1 and 10 mm. The finely constrained values for this asteroid serve as a `design reference model', which is currently used for various planning, operational and modelling purposes by the Hayabusa2 team.
  • We present an updated cumulative size distribution (CSD) for Jupiter Family comet (JFC) nuclei, including a rigourous assessment of the uncertainty on the slope of the CSD. The CSD is expressed as a power law, N(>r_N) \propto r_N^{-q}, where r_N is the radius of the nuclei and q is the slope. We include a large number of optical observations published by ourselves and others since the comprehensive review in the "Comets II" book (Lamy et al. 2004), and make use of an improved fitting method. We assess the uncertainty on the CSD due to all of the unknowns and uncertainties involved (photometric uncertainty, assumed phase function, albedo and shape of the nucleus) by means of Monte Carlo simulations. In order to do this we also briefly review the current measurements of these parameters for JFCs. Our final CSD has a slope q=1.92\pm 0.20 for nuclei with radius r_N \ge 1.25 km.