• In the course of a project to study eclipsing binary stars in vinicity of the Sun, we found that the cooler component of LL Aqr is a solar twin candidate. This is the first known star with properties of a solar twin existing in a non-interacting eclipsing binary, offering an excellent opportunity to fully characterise its physical properties with very high precision. We used extensive multi-band, archival photometry and the Super-WASP project and high-resolution spectroscopy obtained from the HARPS and CORALIE spectrographs. The spectra of both components were decomposed and a detailed LTE abundance analysis was performed. The light and radial velocity curves were simultanously analysed with the Wilson-Devinney code. The resulting highly precise stellar parameters were used for a detailed comparison with PARSEC, MESA, and GARSTEC stellar evolution models. LL Aqr consists of two main-sequence stars (F9 V + G3 V) with masses of M1 = 1.1949$\pm$0.0007 and M2=1.0337$\pm$0.0007 $M_\odot$, radii R1 = 1.321$\pm$0.006 and R2 = 1.002$\pm$0.005 $R_\odot$, temperatures T1=6080$\pm$45 K and T2=5703$\pm$50 K and solar chemical composition [M/H]=0.02$\pm$0.05 dex. The absolute dimensions, radiative and photometric properties, and atmospheric abundances of the secondary are all fully consistent with being a solar twin. Both stars are cooler by about 3.5 $\sigma$ or less metal abundant by 5$\sigma$ than predicted by standard sets of stellar evolution models. When advanced modelling was performed, we found that full agreement with observations can only be obtained for values of the mixing length and envelope overshooting parameters that are hard to accept. The most reasonable and physically justified model fits found with MESA and GARSTEC codes still have discrepancies with observations but only at the level of 1$\sigma$.
  • We present an analysis of a new detached eclipsing binary, OGLE-LMC-ECL-25658, in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The system consists of two late G-type giant stars on an eccentric orbit and orbital period of ~200 days. The system shows total eclipses and the components have similar temperatures, making it ideal for a precise distance determination. Using multi-color photometric and high resolution spectroscopic data, we have performed an analysis of light and radial velocity curves simultaneously using the Wilson Devinney code. We derived orbital and physical parameters of the binary with a high precision of < 1 %. The masses and surface metallicities of the components are virtually the same and equal to 2.23 +/- 0.02 M_sun and [Fe/H] = -0.63 +/- 0.10 dex. However their radii and rates of rotation show a distinct trace of differential stellar evolution. The distance to the system was calculated using an infrared calibration between V-band surface brightness and (V-K) color, leading to a distance modulus of (m-M) = 18.452 +/- 0.023 (statistical) +/- 0.046 (systematic). Because OGLE-LMC-ECL-25658 is located relatively far from the LMC barycenter we applied a geometrical correction for its position in the LMC disc using the van der Marel et al. model of the LMC. The resulting barycenter distance to the galaxy is d_LMC = 50.30 +/- 0.53 (stat.) kpc, and is in perfect agreement with the earlier result of Pietrzynski et al.(2013).
  • We obtained single-phase near-infrared (NIR) magnitudes in the $J$- and $K$-band for a sample of 33 RR Lyrae stars in the Carina dSph galaxy. Applying different theoretical and empirical calibrations of the NIR period-luminosity-metallicity relation for RR Lyrae stars, we find consistent results and obtain a true, reddening-corrected distance modulus of 20.118 $\pm$ 0.017 (statistical) $\pm$ 0.11 (systematic) mag. This value is in excellent agreement with the results obtained in the context of the Araucaria Project from NIR photometry of Red Clump stars (20.165 $\pm$ 0.015) and Tip of Red Giant Branch (20.09 $\pm$ 0.03 $\pm$ 0.12 mag in $J$-band, 20.14 $\pm$ 0.04 $\pm$ 0.14 mag in $K$-band), as well as with most independent distance determinations to this galaxy. The near-infrared RR Lyrae method proved to be a reliable tool for accurate distance determination at the 5 percent level or better, particularly for galaxies and globular clusters that lack young standard candles, like Cepheids.
  • We report the discovery and characterisation of a deeply eclipsing AM CVn-system, Gaia14aae (= ASSASN-14cn). Gaia14aae was identified independently by the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN; Shappee et al. 2014) and by the Gaia Science Alerts project, during two separate outbursts. A third outburst is seen in archival Pan-STARRS-1 (PS1; Schlafly et al. 2012; Tonry et al. 2012; Magnier et al. 2013) and ASAS-SN data. Spectroscopy reveals a hot, hydrogen-deficient spectrum with clear double-peaked emission lines, consistent with an accreting double degenerate classification. We use follow-up photometry to constrain the orbital parameters of the system. We find an orbital period of 49.71 min, which places Gaia14aae at the long period extremum of the outbursting AM CVn period distribution. Gaia14aae is dominated by the light from its accreting white dwarf. Assuming an orbital inclination of 90 degrees for the binary system, the contact phases of the white dwarf lead to lower limits of 0.78 M solar and 0.015 M solar on the masses of the accretor and donor respectively and a lower limit on the mass ratio of 0.019. Gaia14aae is only the third eclipsing AM CVn star known, and the first in which the WD is totally eclipsed. Using a helium WD model, we estimate the accretor's effective temperature to be 12900+-200 K. The three out-burst events occurred within 4 months of each other, while no other outburst activity is seen in the previous 8 years of Catalina Real-time Transient Survey (CRTS; Drake et al. 2009), Pan-STARRS-1 and ASAS-SN data. This suggests that these events might be rebrightenings of the first outburst rather than individual events.
  • We have analyzed the double-lined eclipsing binary system ASAS J180057-2333.8 from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) catalogue . We measure absolute physical and orbital parameters for this system based on archival $V$-band and $I$-band ASAS photometry, as well as on high-resolution spectroscopic data obtained with ESO 3.6m/HARPS and CORALIE spectrographs. The physical and orbital parameters of the system were derived with an accuracy of about 0.5 - 3%. The system is a very rare configuration of two bright well-detached giants of spectral types K1 and K4 and luminosity class II. The radii of the stars are $R_1$ = 52.12 $\pm$ 1.38 and $R_2$ = 67.63 $\pm$ 1.40 R$_\odot$ and their masses are $M_1$ = 4.914 $\pm$ 0.021 and $M_2$ = 4.875$\pm$ 0.021 M$_\odot$ . The exquisite accuracy of 0.5% obtained for the masses of the components is one of the best mass determinations for giants. We derived a precise distance to the system of 2.14 $\pm$ 0.06 kpc (stat.) $\pm$ 0.05 (syst.) which places the star in the Sagittarius-Carina arm. The Galactic rotational velocity of the star is $\Theta_s=258 \pm 26$ km s$^{-1}$ assuming $\Theta_0=238$ km s$^{-1}$. A comparison with PARSEC isochrones places the system at the early phase of core helium burning with an age of slightly larger than 100 million years. The effect of overshooting on stellar evolutionary tracks was explored using the MESA star code.