• The redshift distribution of the short-duration GRBs is a crucial, but currently fragmentary, clue to the nature of their progenitors. Here we present optical observations of nine short GRBs obtained with Gemini, Magellan, and the Hubble Space Telescope. We detect the afterglows and host galaxies of two short bursts, and host galaxies for two additional bursts with known optical afterglow positions, and five with X-ray positions (<6'' radius). In eight of the nine cases we find that the most probable host galaxies are faint, R~23-26.5 mag, and are therefore starkly different from the first few short GRB hosts with R~17-22 mag and z<0.5. Indeed, we measure spectroscopic redshifts of z~0.4-1.1 for the four brightest hosts. A comparison to large field galaxy samples, as well as the hosts of long GRBs and previous short GRBs, indicates that the fainter hosts likely reside at z>1. Our most conservative limit is that at least half of the five hosts without a known redshift reside at z>0.7 (97% confidence level), suggesting that about 1/3-2/3 of all short GRBs originate at higher redshifts than previously determined. This has two important implications: (i) We constrain the acceptable age distributions to a wide lognormal (sigma>1) with tau~4-8 Gyr, or to a power law, P(tau)~tau^n, with -1<n<0; and (ii) the inferred isotropic energies, E_{gamma,iso}~10^50-10^52 erg, are significantly larger than ~10^48-10^49 erg for the low redshift short GRBs, indicating a large spread in energy release or jet opening angles. Finally, we re-iterate the importance of short GRBs as potential gravitational wave sources and find a conservative Advanced LIGO detection rate of ~2-6 yr^-1.
  • Despite a rich phenomenology, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are divided into two classes based on their duration and spectral hardness -- the long-soft and the short-hard bursts. The discovery of afterglow emission from long GRBs was a watershed event, pinpointing their origin to star forming galaxies, and hence the death of massive stars, and indicating an energy release of about 10^51 erg. While theoretical arguments suggest that short GRBs are produced in the coalescence of binary compact objects (neutron stars or black holes), the progenitors, energetics, and environments of these events remain elusive despite recent localizations. Here we report the discovery of the first radio afterglow from a short burst, GRB 050724, which unambiguously associates it with an elliptical galaxy at a redshift, z=0.257. We show that the burst is powered by the same relativistic fireball mechanism as long GRBs, with the ejecta possibly collimated in jets, but that the total energy release is 10-1000 times smaller. More importantly, the nature of the host galaxy demonstrates that short GRBs arise from an old (>1 Gyr) stellar population, strengthening earlier suggestions, and providing support for coalescing compact object binaries as the progenitors.
  • We present observations of the optical ``moving lines'' in spectra of the Galactic relativistic jet source SS433 spread over a twenty year baseline from 1979 to 1999. The red/blue-shifts of the lines reveal the apparent precession of the jet axis in SS433, and we present a new determination of the precession parameters based on these data. We investigate the amplitude and nature of time- and phase-dependent deviations from the kinematic model for the jet precession, including an upper limit on any precessional period derivative of $\dot P < 5 \times 10^{-5}$. We also dicuss the implications of these results for the origins of the relativistic jets in SS433.