• A. Reiners, M. Zechmeister, J.A. Caballero, I. Ribas, J.C. Morales, S.V. Jeffers, P. Schöfer, L. Tal-Or, A. Quirrenbach, P.J. Amado, A. Kaminski, W. Seifert, M. Abril, J. Aceituno, F.J. Alonso-Floriano, M. Ammler-von Eiff, R. Antona, G. Anglada-Escudé, H. Anwand-Heerwart, B. Arroyo-Torres, M. Azzaro, D. Baroch, D. Barrado, F.F. Bauer, S. Becerril, V.J.S. Béjar, D. Benítez, Z.M. Berdiñas, G. Bergond, M. Blümcke, M. Brinkmöller, C. del Burgo, J. Cano, M.C. Cárdenas Vázquez, E. Casal, C. Cifuentes, A. Claret, J. Colomé, M. Cortés-Contreras, S. Czesla, E. Díez-Alonso, S. Dreizler, C. Feiz, M. Fernández, I.M. Ferro, B. Fuhrmeister, D. Galadí-Enríquez, A. Garcia-Piquer, M.L. García Vargas, L. Gesa, V. Gómez, Galera, J.I. González Hernández, R. González-Peinado, U. Grözinger, S. Grohnert, J. Guàrdia, E.W. Guenther, A. Guijarro, E. de Guindos, J. Gutiérrez-Soto, H.-J. Hagen, A.P. Hatzes, P.H. Hauschildt, R.P. Hedrosa, J. Helmling, Th. Henning, I. Hermelo, R. Hernández Arabí, L. Hernández Castaño, F. Hernández Hernando, E. Herrero, A. Huber, P. Huke, E. Johnson, E. de Juan, M. Kim, R. Klein, J. Klüter, A. Klutsch, M. Kürster, M. Lafarga, A. Lamert, M. Lampón, L.M. Lara, W. Laun, U. Lemke, R. Lenzen, R. Launhardt, M. López del Fresno, J. López-González, M. López-Puertas, J.F. López Salas, J. López-Santiago, R. Luque, H. Magán Madinabeitia, U. Mall, L. Mancini, H. Mandel, E. Marfil, J.A. Marín Molina, D. Maroto, Fernández, E.L. Martín, S. Martín-Ruiz, C.J. Marvin, R.J. Mathar, E. Mirabet, D. Montes, M.E. Moreno-Raya, A. Moya, R. Mundt, E. Nagel, V. Naranjo, L. Nortmann, G. Nowak, A. Ofir, R. Oreiro, E. Pallé, J. Panduro, J. Pascual, V.M. Passegger, A. Pavlov, S. Pedraz, A. Pérez-Calpena, D. Pérez Medialdea, M. Perger, M.A.C. Perryman, M. Pluto, O. Rabaza, A. Ramón, R. Rebolo, P. Redondo, S. Reffert, S. Reinhart, P. Rhode, H.-W. Rix, F. Rodler, E. Rodríguez, C. Rodríguez-López, A. Rodríguez Trinidad, R.-R. Rohloff, A. Rosich, S. Sadegi, E. Sánchez-Blanco, M.A. Sánchez Carrasco, A. Sánchez-López, J. Sanz-Forcada, P. Sarkis, L.F. Sarmiento, S. Schäfer, J.H.M.M. Schmitt, J. Schiller, A. Schweitzer, E. Solano, O. Stahl, J.B.P. Strachan, J. Stürmer, J.C. Suárez, H.M. Tabernero, M. Tala, T. Trifonov, S.M. Tulloch, R.G. Ulbrich, G. Veredas, J.I. Vico Linares, F. Vilardell, K. Wagner, J. Winkler, V. Wolthoff, W. Xu, F. Yan, M.R. Zapatero Osorio
    Feb. 9, 2018 astro-ph.SR, astro-ph.EP
    The CARMENES radial velocity (RV) survey is observing 324 M dwarfs to search for any orbiting planets. In this paper, we present the survey sample by publishing one CARMENES spectrum for each M dwarf. These spectra cover the wavelength range 520--1710nm at a resolution of at least $R > 80,000$, and we measure its RV, H$\alpha$ emission, and projected rotation velocity. We present an atlas of high-resolution M-dwarf spectra and compare the spectra to atmospheric models. To quantify the RV precision that can be achieved in low-mass stars over the CARMENES wavelength range, we analyze our empirical information on the RV precision from more than 6500 observations. We compare our high-resolution M-dwarf spectra to atmospheric models where we determine the spectroscopic RV information content, $Q$, and signal-to-noise ratio. We find that for all M-type dwarfs, the highest RV precision can be reached in the wavelength range 700--900nm. Observations at longer wavelengths are equally precise only at the very latest spectral types (M8 and M9). We demonstrate that in this spectroscopic range, the large amount of absorption features compensates for the intrinsic faintness of an M7 star. To reach an RV precision of 1ms$^{-1}$ in very low mass M dwarfs at longer wavelengths likely requires the use of a 10m class telescope. For spectral types M6 and earlier, the combination of a red visual and a near-infrared spectrograph is ideal to search for low-mass planets and to distinguish between planets and stellar variability. At a 4m class telescope, an instrument like CARMENES has the potential to push the RV precision well below the typical jitter level of 3-4ms$^{-1}$.
  • One of the necessary parameters needed for the interpretation of the light curves of transiting exoplanets or eclipsing binaries, as well as interferometric measurements of a star or microlensing events is how the intensity and polarization of a light change from the center to the limb. Scattering and absorption processes in stellar atmosphere affect both the center-to limb variation of intensity (CLVI) and polarization (CLVP). In this paper, we present a study of the CLVI and CLVP in continuum spectra considering different contributions of scattering and absorption opacity for different spectral type stars with spherical atmospheres. We solve the polarized radiative transfer equation in the presence of continuum scattering, considering spherical stellar model atmospheres. We developed two independent codes based on Feautrier and short characteristics methods to cross-check our results. We calculate the CLVI and CLVP in continuum for the Phoenix grid of spherical stellar model atmospheres for a range of $T_{eff} = 4000 - 7000 \rm K$, $\log g = 1.0 - 5.5$ and $\lambda = 4000 - 7000 \rm \AA$, which are tabulated and available at the CDS. For sub-giant and dwarf stars ($\log g = 3.0 - 4.5$), lower $\log g$ and lower $T_{eff}$ of a star lead to higher limb polarization of the star. For giant and supergiant stars ($\log g = 1.0 - 2.5$), the highest effective temperature yields the largest polarization. By decreasing of the $T_{eff}$ of a star down to $4500 - 5500 \rm K$ (depending on $\log g$) the limb polarization decreases and reaches a local minimum. It increases again down to $T_{eff}$ of $4000 \rm K$. For the most compact dwarf stars ($\log g = 5.0 - 5.5$) the limb polarization degree shows a maximum for models with $T_{eff}$ in the range $4200 - 4600 \rm K$ (depending on $\log g$) and decreases toward higher and lower temperatures.
  • A solution of the radiative-transfer problem in 3D with arbitrary velocity fields in the Eulerian frame is presented. The method is implemented in our 3D radiative transfer framework and used in the PHOENIX/3D code. It is tested by comparison to our well- tested 1D co-moving frame radiative transfer code, where the treatment of a monotonic velocity field is implemented in the Lagrangian frame. The Eulerian formulation does not need much additional memory and is useable on state-of-the-art computers, even large-scale applications with 1000's of wavelength points are feasible.
  • We present a new code for the calculation of the 1D structure and synthetic spectra of accretion disks. The code is an extension of the general purpose stellar atmosphere code PHOENIX and is therefore capable of including extensive lists of atomic and molecular lines as well as dust in the calculations. We assume that the average viscosity can be represented by a critical Reynolds number in a geometrically thin disk and solve the structure and radiative transfer equations for a number of disk rings in the vertical direction. The combination of these rings provides the total disk structure and spectrum. Since the warm inner regions of protoplanetary disks show a rich molecular spectrum, they are well suited for a spectral analysis with our models. In this paper we test our code by comparing our models with high-resolution VLT CRIRES spectra of the T Tauri star GQ Lup.
  • We investigate the ability of both LTE and Non-LTE models to fit the near UV band absolute flux distribution and individual spectral line profiles of three standard stars for which high quality spectrophotometry and high resolution spectroscopy are available: The Sun (G2 V), Arcturus (K2 III), and Procyon (F5 IV-V). We investigate 1) the effect of the choice of atomic line list on the ability of NLTE models to fit the near UV band flux level, 2) the amount of a hypothesized continuous thermal absorption extinction source required to allow NLTE models to fit the observations, and 3) the semi-empirical temperature structure required to fit the observations with NLTE models and standard continuous near UV extinction. We find that all models that are computed with high quality atomic line lists predict too much flux in the near UV band for Arcturus, but fit the warmer stars well. The variance among independent measurements of the solar irradiance in the near UV is sufficiently large that we cannot definitely conclude that models predict too much near UV flux, in contrast to other recent results. We surmise that the inadequacy of current atmospheric models of K giants in the near UV band is best addressed by hypothesizing that there is still missing continuous thermal extinction, and that the missing near UV extinction becomes more important with decreasing effective temperature for spectral classes later than early G, suggesting a molecular origin.
  • We present a UVES/VLT high resolution atlas of three L dwarfs and one T dwarf system, spectral classes at which most of the objects are brown dwarfs. Our atlas covers the optical region from H$\alpha$ up to the near infrared at 1 $\mu$m. We present spectral details of ultra-cool atmospheres at very high resolution ($R \sim 33 000$) and compare the spectra to model calculations. Our comparison shows that molecular features from VO and CaH, and atomic features from Cs and Rb are reasonably well fit by current models. On the other hand, features due to TiO, CrH, and water, and atomic Na and K reveal large discrepancies between model calculations and our observations.
  • We report optical photometry and optical through mid-infrared spectroscopy of the classical nova V1186 Sco. This slowly developing nova had an complex light curve with multiple secondary peaks similar to those seen in PW Vul. The time to decline 2 magnitudes, t$_2$, was 20 days but the erratic nature of the light curve makes determination of intrinsic properties based on the decline time (e.g., luminosity) problematic, and the often cited MMRD relationship of Della Valle and Livio (1995) fails to yield a plausible distance. Spectra covering 0.35 to 35 $\mu$m were obtained in two separate epochs during the first year of outburst. The first set of spectra, taken about 2 months after visible maximum, are typical of a CO-type nova with narrow line emission from \ion{H}{1}, \ion{Fe}{2}, \ion{O}{1} and \ion{He}{1}. Later data, obtained between 260 and 380 days after maximum, reveal an emerging nebular spectrum. \textit{Spitzer} spectra show weakening hydrogen recombination emission with the emergence of [\ion{Ne}{2}] (12.81 $\mu$m) as the strongest line. Strong emission from [\ion{Ne}{3}] (15.56 $\mu$m) is also detected. Photoionization models with low effective temperature sources and only marginal neon enhancement (Ne $\sim$ 1.3 Ne$_{\odot}$) are consistent with these IR fine-structure neon lines indicating that V1186 Sco did not occur on a ONeMg white dwarf. In contrast, the slow and erratic light curve evolution, spectral development, and photoionization analysis of the ejecta imply the outburst occurred on a low mass CO white dwarf. We note that this is the first time strong [\ion{Ne}{2}] lines have been detected so early in the outburst of a CO nova and suggests that the presence of mid-infrared neon lines is not directly indicative of a ONeMg nova event.
  • We provide a grid of PHOENIX spectra of red giant and supergiant stars, that extend through optical and near-IR wavelengths. For the first time, models are also provided with modified surface abundances of C, N and O, as a step towards accounting for the changes known to occur due to convective dredge-up (and to be enhanced in the case of rotation). The aims are (i) to assess how well current models reproduce observed spectra, (ii) to quantify the effects of the abundance changes on the spectra, and (iii) to determine how these changes affect estimates of fundamental stellar parameters. Observed giant star spectra can be fitted very well at solar metallicity down to about 3400K. Modified surface abundances are preferred in only a minority of cases for luminosity class II, possibly indicating mixing in excess of standard first dredge-up. Supergiant stars show a larger variety of near-IR spectra, and good fits are currently obtained for about one third of the observations only. Modified surface abundances help reproducing strong CN bands, but do not suffice to resolve all the difficulties. The effect of the abundance changes on the estimated Teff depends on the wavelength range of observation and can amount several 100K. Reasons for the remaining discrepancies are discussed.
  • We constructed hydrodynamical model atmospheres for mid M-type main-, as well as pre-main-sequence (PMS) objects. Despite the complex chemistry encountered in these cool atmospheres a reasonably accurate representation of the radiative transfer is possible, even in the context of time-dependent and three-dimensional models. The models provide detailed information about the morphology of M-type granulation and statistical properties of the convective surface flows. In particular, we determined the efficiency of the convective energy transport, and the efficiency of mixing by convective overshoot. The convective transport efficiency was expressed in terms of an equivalent mixing-length parameter alpha in the formulation of mixing-length theory (MLT) given by Mihalas (1978). Alpha amounts to values around 2 for matching the entropy of the deep, adiabatically stratified regions of the convective envelope, and lies between 2.5 and 3.0 for matching the thermal structure of the deep photosphere. For current spectral analysis of PMS objects this implies that MLT models based on alpha=2.0 overestimate the effective temperature by 100 K and surface gravities by 0.25 dex. The average thermal structure of the formally convectively stable layers is little affected by convective overshoot and wave heating, i.e., stays close to radiative equilibrium conditions. Our models suggest that the rate of mixing by convective overshoot declines exponentially with geometrical distance to the Schwarzschild stability boundary. It increases at given effective temperature with decreasing gravitational acceleration.
  • (Abridged) We investigate the effects of metallicity on the broad-band photometric colors of late-type giants, and make a comparison of synthetic colors with observed photometric properties of late-type giants over a wide range of effective temperatures (T_eff=3500-4800 K) and gravities (log g=0.0-2.5), at [M/H]=-1.0 and -2.0. The influence of metallicity on the synthetic photometric colors is generally small at effective temperatures above \~3800 K, but the effects grow larger at lower T_eff, due to the changing efficiency of molecule formation which reduces molecular opacities at lower [M/H]. To make a detailed comparison of the synthetic and observed photometric colors of late type giants in the T_eff--color and color--color planes, we derive a set of new T_eff--log g--color relations based on synthetic photometric colors, at [M/H]=-0.5, -1.0, -1.5, and -2.0. While differences between the new T_eff--color relations and those available from the literature are typically well within ~100 K, effective temperatures predicted by the scales based on synthetic colors tend to be slightly higher than those resulting from the T_eff--color relations based on observations, with the offsets up to ~100 K. This is clearly seen both at [M/H]=-1.0 and -2.0, especially in the T_eff--(B-V) and T_eff--(V-K) planes. The consistency between T_eff--log g--color scales based on synthetic colors calculated with different stellar atmosphere codes is very good, with typical differences being well within \Delta T_eff~70 K at [M/H]=-1.0 and \Delta T_eff~40 K at [M/H]=-2.0.
  • We present atmospheric models of red giant stars of various metallicities, including extremely metal poor (XMP, [Fe/H]<-3.5) models, with many chemical species, including, significantly, the first two ionization stages of Strontium (Sr) and Barium (Ba), treated in Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE) with various degrees of realism. We conclude that 1) for all lines that are useful Sr and Ba abundance diagnostics the magnitude and sense of the computed NLTE effect on the predicted line strength is metallicity dependent, 2) the indirect NLTE effect of overlap between Ba and Sr transitions and transitions of other species that are also treated in NLTE non-negligibly enhances NLTE abundance corrections for some lines, 3) the indirect NLTE effect of NLTE opacity of other species on the equilibrium structure of the atmospheric model is not significant, 4) the computed NLTE line strengths differ negligibly if collisional b-b and b-f rates are an order of magnitude smaller or larger than those calculated with standard analytic formulae, and 5) the effect of NLTE upon the resonance line of Ba II at 4554.03 AA is independent of whether that line is treated with hyperfine splitting. As a result, the derivation of abundances of Ba and Sr for metal-poor red giant stars with LTE modeling that are in the literature should be treated with caution.
  • We show that contrary to what is expected from 1D stationary model atmospheres, 3D hydrodynamical modeling predicts a considerable influence of convection on the spectral properties of late-type giants. This is due to the fact that convection overshoots into the formally stable outer atmospheric layers producing a notable granulation pattern in the 3D hydrodynamical models, which has a direct influence on the observable spectra and colors. Within the framework of standard 1D model atmospheres the average thermal stratification of the 3D hydro model can not be reproduced with any reasonable choice of the mixing length parameter and formulation of the turbulent pressure. The differences in individual photometric colors -- in terms of 3D versus 1D -- reach up to ~0.2 mag, or \Delta Teff~70K. We discuss the impact of full 3D hydrodynamical models on the interpretation of observable properties of late-type giants, briefly mentioning problems and challenges which need to be solved for bringing these models to a routine use within the astronomical community in 5-10 years from now.
  • To assess the current status in the theoretical modeling of the spectral properties of late-type giants, we provide a comparison of synthetic photometric colors of late-type giants (calculated with PHOENIX, MARCS and ATLAS model atmospheres) with observations, at [M/H]=0.0 and -2.0. Overall, there is a good agreement between observed and synthetic colors, and synthetic colors and published Teff-color relations, both at [M/H]=0.0 and -2.0. Deviations from the observed trends in Teff-color planes are generally within \pm 150K (or less) in the effective temperature range Teff=3500-4800K. Synthetic colors calculated with different stellar atmosphere models typically agree to ~100K, within a large range of effective temperatures and gravities. Some discrepancies are seen in the Teff-(B-V) plane below Teff~3800K at [M/H]=0.0, due to difficulties in reproducing the 'turn-off' to the bluer colors which is seen in the observed data at Teff~3600K. Note that at [M/H]=-2.0 effective temperatures given by the scale of Alonso et al. (1999) are generally lower than those resulting from other Teff-color relations based both on observed and synthetic colors.
  • Using NACO on the VLT in the imaging mode we have detected an object at a distance of only 0.7 arcsec from GQ Lup. The object turns out to be co-moving. We have taken two K-band spectra with a resolution of lambda /Delta lambda=700. In here, we analyze the spectra in detail. We show that the shape of spectrum is not spoiled by differences in the Strehl ratio in the blue and in the red part, as well as differential refraction. We reanalyze the spectra and derive the spectral type of the companion using classical methods. We find that the object has a spectral type between M9V and L4V, which corresponds to a Teff between 1600 and 2500 K. Using GAIA-dusty models, we find that the spectral type derivation is robust against different log(g)-values. The Teff derived from the models is again in the range between 1800 and 2400 K. While the models reproduce nicely the general shape of the spectrum, the 12CO-lines in the spectrum have about half the depth as those in the model. We speculate that this difference might be caused by veiling, like in other objects of similar age, and spectral class. We also find that the absolute brightness of the companion matches that of other low-mass free-floating objects of similar age and spectral type. A comparison with the objects in USco observed by Mohanty et al. (2004) shows that the companion of GQ Lup has a lower mass than any of these, as it is of later spectral type, and younger. The same is as true, for the companion of AB Pic. To have a first estimate of the mass of the object we compare the derived Teff and luminosity with those calculated from evolutionary tracks. We also point out that future instruments, like NAHUAL, will finally allow us to derive the masses of such objects more precisely.
  • We present new synthetic broad-band photometric colors for late-type giants based on synthetic spectra calculated with the PHOENIX model atmosphere code. The grid covers effective temperatures T_eff=3000...5000K, gravities log g=-0.5...+3.5, and metallicities [M/H]=+0.5...-4.0. We show that individual broad-band photometric colors are strongly affected by model parameters such as molecular opacities, gravity, microturbulent velocity, and stellar mass. Our exploratory 3D modeling of a prototypical late-type giant shows that convection has a noticeable effect on the photometric colors too, as it alters significantly both the vertical and horizontal thermal structures in the outer atmosphere. The differences between colors calculated with full 3D hydrodynamical and 1D model atmospheres are significant (e.g., \Delta(V-K)~0.2 mag), translating into offsets in effective temperature of up to ~70K. For a sample of 74 late-type giants in the Solar neighborhood, with interferometric effective temperatures and broad-band photometry available in the literature, we compare observed colors with a new PHOENIX grid of synthetic photometric colors, as well as with photometric colors calculated with the MARCS and ATLAS model atmosphere codes. (abridged)
  • We compare evolutionary models for close-in exoplanets coupling irradiation and evaporation due respectively to the thermal and high energy flux of the parent star with observations of recently discovered new transiting planets. The models provide an overall good agreement with observations, although at the very limit of the quoted error bars of OGLE-TR-10, depending on its age. Using the same general theory, we show that the three recently detected hot-Neptune planets (GJ436, $\rho$ Cancri, $\mu$ Ara) may originate from more massive gas giants which have undergone significant evaporation. We thus suggest that hot-Neptunes and hot-Jupiters may share the same origin and evolution history. Our scenario provides testable predictions in terms of the mass-radius relationships of these hot-Neptunes.
  • Late type giants (RGB/AGB stars) will be important tracers of the Galactic morphology and evolution in the framework of Gaia, as they are intrinsically bright and thus can probe distant stellar populations or those obscured by interstellar extinction. A realistic representation of their atmospheres and spectra with stellar atmosphere models is thus of crucial importance, both for the design and optimization of Gaia instruments, as well as the interpretation of provided astrophysical data. Our analysis of synthetic photometric colors of late-type giants based on PHOENIX, MARCS and ATLAS model atmospheres indicates a general agreement between the current theoretical predictions and observations in the framework of stationary 1-D model atmospheres. Presently available models allow temperature determinations of RGB/AGB stars to an accuracy of ~\pm100 K. In an exploratory study we try to quantify possible residual systematic effects due to the approximations made in 1-D models using full 3-D hydrodynamical models. We find that differences in broad-band photometric colors calculated with 1-D and 3-D models are significant, translating to the offsets in effective temperature of up to ~70 K. Clearly, full 3-D hydrodynamical models will help to alleviate such ambiguities in current theoretical modeling. Additionally, they will allow to study new phenomena, to open qualitatively new windows for stellar astrophysics in the Gaia-era.
  • We present LTE and NLTE atmospheric models of a star with solar parameters, and study the effect of treating many thousands of Iron group lines out of LTE on the computed atmospheric structure, overall absolute flux distribution, and the moderately high resolution spectrum in the visible and near UV bands. Our NLTE modeling includes the first two or three ionization stages of 20 chemical elements, up to and including much of the Fe-group, and includes about 20000 Fe I and II lines. We investigate separately the effects of treating the light metals and the Fe-group elements in NLTE. Our main conclusions are that 1) NLTE line blanketed models with direct multi-level NLTE for many actual transitions gives qualitatively similar results as the more approximate treatment of Anderson (1989) for both the Fe statistical equilibrium and the atmospheric temperature structure, 2) models with many Fe lines in NLTE have a temperature structure that agrees more closely with LTE semi-empirical models based on center-to-limb variation and a wide variety of spectra lines, whereas LTE models agree more with semi-empirical models based only on an LTE calculation of the Fe I excitation equilibrium, 3) the NLTE effects of Fe-group elements on the model structure and flux distribution are much more important than the NLTE effects of all the light metals combined, and serve to substantially increases the violet and near UV flux level as a result of NLTE Fe over-ionization. These results suggest that there may still be important UV opacity missing from the models.
  • We review our present understanding of the physical properties of substellar objects, brown dwarfs and irradiated or non-irradiated gaseous exoplanets. This includes a description of their internal properties, mechanical structure and heat content, their atmospheric properties, thermal profile and emergent spectrum, and their evolution, in particular as irradiated companions of a close parent star. The general theory can be used to make predictions in term of detectability for the future observational projects. Special attention is devoted to the evolution of the two presently detected transit planets, HD209458B and OGLE-TR-56B. For this latter, we present a consistent evolution for its recently revised mass and show that we reproduce the observed radius within its error bars. We briefly discuss differences between brown dwarfs and gaseous planets, both in terms of mass function and formation process. We outline several arguments to show that the minimum mass for deuterium burning, recently adopted officially as the limit to distinguish the two types of objects, is unlikely to play any specific role in star formation, so that such a limit is of purely semantic nature and is not supported by a physical justification.
  • We report a measurement of limb darkening of a solar-like star in the very high magnification microlensing event MOA 2002-BLG-33. A 15 hour deviation from the light curve profile expected for a single lens was monitored intensively in V and I passbands by five telescopes spanning the globe. Our modelling of the light curve showed the lens to be a close binary system whose centre-of-mass passed almost directly in front of the source star. The source star was identified as an F8-G2 main sequence turn-off star. The measured stellar profiles agree with current stellar atmosphere theory to within ~4% in two passbands. The effective angular resolution of the measurements is <1 micro-arcsec. These are the first limb darkening measurements obtained by microlensing for a Solar-like star.
  • We obtain high-precision limb-darkening measurements in five bands (V, V_E, I_E, I, and H) for the K3 III (Teff=4200 K, [Fe/H]=+0.3, log(g)=2.3) source of the Galactic bulge microlensing event EROS BLG-2000-5. These measurements are inconsistent with the predictions of atmospheric models at >10 sigma. While the disagreement is present in all bands, it is most apparent in I, I_E and V_E, in part because the data are better and in part because the intrinsic disagreement is stronger. We find that when limb-darkening profiles are normalized to have unit total flux, the I-band models for a broad range of temperatures all cross each other at a common point. The solar profile also passes through this point. However, the profile as measured by microlensing does not. We conjecture that the models have incorporated some aspect of solar physics that is not shared by giant atmospheres.
  • SN 2001el is the first normal Type Ia supernova to show a strong, intrinsic polarization signal. In addition, during the epochs prior to maximum light, the CaII IR triplet absorption is seen distinctly and separately at both normal photospheric velocities and at very high velocities. The high-velocity triplet absorption is highly polarized, with a different polarization angle than the rest of the spectrum. The unique observation allows us to construct a relatively detailed picture of the layered geometrical structure of the supernova ejecta: in our interpretation, the ejecta layers near the photosphere (v \approx 10,000 km/s) obey a near axial symmetry, while a detached, high-velocity structure (v \approx 18,000-25,000 km/s) with high CaII line opacity deviates from the photospheric axisymmetry. By partially obscuring the underlying photosphere, the high-velocity structure causes a more incomplete cancellation of the polarization of the photospheric light, and so gives rise to the polarization peak and rotated polarization angle of the high-velocity IR triplet feature. In an effort to constrain the ejecta geometry, we develop a technique for calculating 3-D synthetic polarization spectra and use it to generate polarization profiles for several parameterized configurations. In particular, we examine the case where the inner ejecta layers are ellipsoidal and the outer, high-velocity structure is one of four possibilities: a spherical shell, an ellipsoidal shell, a clumped shell, or a toroid. The synthetic spectra rule out the spherical shell model, disfavor a toroid, and find a best fit with the clumped shell. We show further that different geometries can be more clearly discriminated if observations are obtained from several different lines of sight.
  • Based on detailed 2D and 3D numerical radiation-hydrodynamics (RHD) simulations of time-dependent compressible convection, we have studied the dynamics and thermal structure of the convective surface layers of a prototypical late-type M-dwarf (Teff~2800K log(g)=5.0, solar chemical composition). The RHD models predict stellar granulation qualitatively similar to the familiar solar pattern. Quantitatively, the granular cells show a convective turn-over time scale of ~100s, and a horizontal scale of 80km; the relative intensity contrast of the granular pattern amounts to 1.1%, and root-mean-square vertical velocities reach 240m/s at maximum. Deviations from radiative equilibrium in the higher, formally convectively stable atmospheric layers are found to be insignificant allowing a reliable modeling of the atmosphere with 1D standard model atmospheres. A mixing-length parameter of alpha=2.1 provides the best representation of the average thermal structure of the RHD model atmosphere while alternative values are found when fitting the asymptotic entropy encountered in deeper layers of the stellar envelope alpha=1.5, or when matching the vertical velocity field alpha=3.5. The close correspondence between RHD and standard model atmospheres implies that presently existing discrepancies between observed and predicted stellar colors in the M-dwarf regime cannot be traced back to an inadequate treatment of convection in the 1D standard models. The RHD models predict a modest extension of the convectively mixed region beyond the formal Schwarzschild stability boundary which provides hints for the distribution of dust grains in cooler (brown dwarf) atmospheres.
  • We present VLT FORS1 spectroscopy that temporally resolves the second caustic crossing of the Bulge K giant source of microlensing event EROS 2000-BLG-5, the first time this has been accomplished for several phases of a caustic transit. The ~1 angstrom H-alpha equivalent width of the source star increases slightly as the center of the star egresses the caustic and then plummets by 30% during the final limb crossing. These changes are not seen in contemporaneous spectra of control stars in the FORS1 slit, but are qualitatively consistent with expectations from stellar atmosphere models as the caustic differentially magnifies different portions of the stellar face of the target. Observations such as these in a variety of stellar lines are equivalent to atmospheric tomography and are expected to provide a direct test of stellar models.
  • We present a grid of nova models that have an extremely large number of species treated in non-LTE, and apply it to the analysis of an extensive time series of ultraviolet spectroscopic data for Nova Cygni 1992. We use ultraviolet colors to derive the time development of the effective temperature of the expanding atmosphere during the fireball phase and the first ten days of the optically thick wind phase. We find that the nova has a pure optically thick wind spectrum until about 10 days after the explosion. During this interval, we find that synthetic spectra based on our derived temperature sequence agree very well with the observed spectra. We find that a sequence of hydrogen deficient models provides an equally good fit providing the model effective temperature is shifted upwards by ~1000 K. We find that high resolution UV spectra of the optically thick wind phase are fit moderately well by the models. We find that a high resolution spectrum of the fireball phase is better fit by a model with a steep density gradient, similar to that of a supernova, than by a nova model.