• Due to the strong magnetic field and related abnormal surface layers existing in rapidly oscillating Ap stars, systematic errors are likely to be present when determining their effective temperatures, which potentially compromises asteroseismic studies of these pulsators. Using long-baseline interferometry, our goal is to determine accurate angular diameters of a number of roAp targets to provide a temperature calibration for these stars. We obtained interferometric observations of 10 Aql with the visible spectrograph VEGA at the CHARA array. We determined a limb-darkened angular diameter of 0.275+/-0.009 mas and deduced a linear radius of 2.32+/-0.09 R_sun. We estimated the star's bolometric flux and used it, in combination with its parallax and angular diameter, to determine the star's luminosity and effective temperature. For two data sets of bolometric flux we derived an effective temperature of 7800+/-170 K and a luminosity of 18+/-1 L_sun or of 8000+/-210 K and 19+/-2 L_sun. We used these fundamental parameters together with the large frequency separation to constrain the mass and the age of 10 Aql, using the CESAM stellar evolution code. Assuming a solar chemical composition and ignoring all kinds of diffusion and settling of elements, we obtained a mass of 1.92 M_sun and an age of 780 Gy or a mass of 1.95 M_sun and an age of 740 Gy, depending on the considered bolometric flux. For the first time, we managed to determine an accurate angular diameter for a star smaller than 0.3 mas and to derive its fundamental parameters. In particular, by only combining our interferometric data and the bolometric flux, we derived an effective temperature that can be compared to those derived from atmosphere models. Such fundamental parameters can help for testing the mechanism responsible for the excitation of the oscillations observed in the magnetic pulsating stars.
  • Studying exoplanet host stars is of the utmost importance to establish the link between the presence of exoplanets around various types of stars and to understand the respective evolution of stars and exoplanets. Using the limb-darkened diameter (LDD) obtained from interferometric data, we determine the fundamental parameters of four exoplanet host stars. We are particularly interested in the F4 main-sequence star, {\theta} Cyg, for which Kepler has recently revealed solar-like oscillations that are unexpected for this type of star. Furthermore, recent photometric and spectroscopic measurements with SOPHIE and ELODIE (OHP) show evidence of a quasi-periodic radial velocity of \sim150 days. Models of this periodic change in radial velocity predict either a complex planetary system orbiting the star, or a new and unidentified stellar pulsation mode. We performed interferometric observations of {\theta} Cyg, 14 Andromedae, {\upsilon} Andromedae and 42 Draconis for two years with VEGA/CHARA (Mount Wilson, California) in several three-telescope configurations. We measured accurate limb darkened diameters and derived their radius, mass and temperature using empirical laws. We obtain new accurate fundamental parameters for stars 14 And, {\upsilon} And and 42 Dra. We also obtained limb darkened diameters with a minimum precision of \sim 1.3%, leading to minimum planet masses of Msini=5.33\pm 0.57, 0.62 \pm 0.09 and 3.79\pm0.29 MJup for 14 And b, {\upsilon} And b and 42 Dra b, respectively. The interferometric measurements of {\theta} Cyg show a significant diameter variability that remains unexplained up to now. We propose that the presence of these discrepancies in the interferometric data is caused by either an intrinsic variation of the star or an unknown close companion orbiting around it.
  • We aim to constrain the geometrical extent of the chromosphere of non-binary K giant stars and detect any spatial structures in the chromosphere. We performed observations with the CHARA interferometer and the VEGA beam combiner at optical wavelengths. We observed seven non-binary K giant stars. We measured the ratio of the radii of the photosphere to the chromosphere using the interferometric measurements in the Halpha and the Ca II infrared triplet line cores. For beta Ceti, spectro-interferometric observations are compared to an non-local thermal equilibrium (NLTE) semi-empirical model atmosphere including a chromosphere. The NLTE computations provide line intensities and contribution functions that indicate the relative locations where the line cores are formed and can constrain the size of the limb-darkened disk of the stars with chromospheres. We measured the angular diameter of seven K giant stars and deduced their fundamental parameters: effective temperatures, radii, luminosities, and masses. We determined the geometrical extent of the chromosphere for four giant stars. The chromosphere extents obtained range between 16% to 47% of the stellar radius. The NLTE computations confirm that the Ca II/849 nm line core is deeper in the chromosphere of ? Cet than either of the Ca II/854 nm and Ca II/866 nm line cores. We present a modified version of a semi-empirical model atmosphere derived by fitting the Ca II triplet line cores of this star. In four of our targets, we also detect the signature of a differential signal showing the presence of asymmetries in the chromospheres. Conclusions. It is the first time that geometrical extents and structure in the chromospheres of non-binary K giant stars are determined by interferometry. These observations provide strong constrains on stellar atmosphere models.
  • Physical processes working in the stellar interiors as well as the evolution of stars depend on some fundamental stellar properties, such as mass, radius, luminosity, and chemical abundances. A classical way to test stellar interior models is to compare the predicted and observed location of a star on theoretical evolutionary tracks in a H-R diagram. This requires the best possible determinations of stellar mass, radius, luminosity and abundances. To derive its fundamental parameters, we observed the well-known rapidly oscillating Ap star, $\gamma$ Equ, using the visible spectro-interferometer VEGA installed on the optical CHARA array. We computed the calibrated squared visibility and derived the limb-darkened diameter. We used the whole energy flux distribution, the parallax and this angular diameter to determine the luminosity and the effective temperature of the star. We obtained a limb-darkened angular diameter of 0.564~$\pm$~0.017~mas and deduced a radius of $R$~=~2.20~$\pm$~0.12~${\rm R_{\odot}}$. Without considering the multiple nature of the system, we derived a bolometric flux of $(3.12\pm 0.21)\times 10^{-7}$ erg~cm$^{-2}$~s$^{-1}$ and an effective temperature of 7364~$\pm$~235~K, which is below the effective temperature that has been previously determined. Under the same conditions we found a luminosity of $L$~=~12.8~$\pm$~1.4~${\rm L_{\odot}}$. When the contribution of the closest companion to the bolometric flux is considered, we found that the effective temperature and luminosity of the primary star can be, respectively, up to $\sim$~100~K and up to $\sim$~0.8~L$_\odot$ smaller than the values mentioned above.These new values of the radius and effective temperature should bring further constraints on the asteroseismic modelling of the star.
  • High-precision interferometric measurements of pulsating stars help to characterize their close environment. In 1974, a close companion was discovered around the pulsating star beta Cep using the speckle interferometry technique and features at the limit of resolution (20 milli-arcsecond or mas) of the instrument were mentioned that may be due to circumstellar material. Beta Cep has a magnetic field that might be responsible for a spherical shell or ring-like structure around the star as described by the MHD models. Using the visible recombiner VEGA installed on the CHARA long-baseline interferometer at Mt. Wilson, we aim to determine the angular diameter of beta Cep and resolve its close environment with a spatial resolution up to 1 mas level. Medium spectral resolution (R=6000) observations of beta Cep were secured with the VEGA instrument over the years 2008 and 2009. These observations were performed with the S1S2 (30m) and W1W2 (100m) baselines of the array. We investigated several models to reproduce our observations. A large-scale structure of a few mas is clearly detected around the star with a typical flux relative contribution of 0.23 +- 0.02. Our best model is a co-rotational geometrical thin ring around the star as predicted by magnetically-confined wind shock models. The ring inner diameter is 8.2 +- 0.8 mas and the width is 0.6 +- 0.7 mas. The orientation of the rotation axis on the plane of the sky is PA = 60 +- 1 deg, while the best fit of the mean angular diameter of beta Cep gives UD[V] = 0.22 +- 0.05 mas. Our data are compatible with the predicted position of the close companion of beta Cep. These results bring additional constraints on the fundamental parameters and on the future MHD and asteroseismological models of the star.
  • A crucial issue in star formation is to understand the physical mechanism by which mass is accreted onto and ejected by a young star. The visible spectrometer VEGA on the CHARA array can be an efficient means of probing the structure and the kinematics of the hot circumstellar gas at sub-AU. For the first time, we observed the Herbig Ae star AB Aur in the H$\alpha$ emission line, using the VEGA low spectral resolution on two baselines of the array. We computed and calibrated the spectral visibilities between 610 nm and 700 nm. To simultaneously reproduce the line profile and the visibility, we used a 1-D radiative transfer code that calculates level populations for hydrogen atoms in a spherical geometry and synthetic spectro-interferometric observables. We clearly resolved AB Aur in the H$\alpha$ line and in a part of the continuum, even at the smallest baseline of 34 m. The small P-Cygni absorption feature is indicative of an outflow but could not be explained by a spherical stellar wind model. Instead, it favors a magneto-centrifugal X-disk or disk-wind geometry. The fit of the spectral visibilities could not be accounted for by a wind alone, so we considered a brightness asymmetry possibly caused by large-scale nebulosity or by the known spiral structures, inducing a visibility modulation around H$\alpha$. Thanks to the unique capabilities of VEGA, we managed to simultaneously record for the first time a spectrum at a resolution of 1700 and spectral visibilities in the visible range on a target as faint as $m_{V}$ = 7.1. It was possible to rule out a spherical geometry for the wind of AB Aur and provide realistic solutions to account for the H$\alpha$ emission compatible with magneto-centrifugal acceleration. The study illustrates the advantages of optical interferometry and motivates observations of other bright young stars to shed light on the accretion/ejection processes.
  • We present comprehensive models for the Herbig Ae stars MWC275 and AB Aur that aim to explain their spectral energy distribution (from UV to millimeter) and long baseline interferometry (from near-infrared to millimeter) simultaneously. Data from the literature, combined with new mid-infrared (MIR) interferometry from the Keck Segment Tilting Experiment, are modeled using an axisymmetric Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. Models in which most of the near-infrared (NIR) emission arises from a dust rim fail to fit the NIR spectral energy distribution (SED) and sub-milli-arcsecond NIR CHARA interferometry. Following recent work, we include an additional gas emission component with similar size scale to the dust rim, inside the sublimation radius, to fit the NIR SED and long-baseline NIR interferometry on MWC275 and AB Aur. In the absence of shielding of star light by gas, we show that the gas-dust transition region in these YSOs will have to contain highly refractory dust, sublimating at ~1850K. Despite having nearly identical structure in the thermal NIR, the outer disks of MWC275 and AB Aur differ substantially. In contrast to the AB Aur disk, MWC275 lacks small grains in the disk atmosphere capable of producing significant 10-20micron emission beyond ~7AU, forcing the outer regions into the "shadow" of the inner disk