• We have modelled high resolution ALMA imaging of six strong gravitationally lensed galaxies detected by the Herschel Space Observatory. Our modelling recovers mass properties of the lensing galaxies and, by determining magnification factors, intrinsic properties of the lensed sub-millimetre sources. We find that the lensed galaxies all have high ratios of star formation rate to dust mass, consistent with or higher than the mean ratio for high redshift sub-millimetre galaxies and low redshift ultra-luminous infra-red galaxies. Source reconstruction reveals that most galaxies exhibit disturbed morphologies. Both the cleaned image plane data and the directly observed interferometric visibilities have been modelled, enabling comparison of both approaches. In the majority of cases, the recovered lens models are consistent between methods, all six having mass density profiles that are close to isothermal. However, one system with poor signal to noise shows mildly significant differences.
  • We use a sample of 4178 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z = 3, 4 and 5 in the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Ultra Deep Survey (UDS) field to investigate the relationship between the observed slope of the stellar continuum emission in the ultraviolet, {\beta}, and the thermal dust emission, as quantified via the so-called 'infrared excess' (IRX = LIR/LUV). Through a stacking analysis we directly measure the 850-{\mu}m flux density of LBGs in our deep (0.9mJy) James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) SCUBA-2 850-{\mu}m map, as well as deep public Herschel/SPIRE 250-, 350- and 500-{\mu}m imaging. We establish functional forms for the IRX-{\beta} relation to z ~ 5, confirming that there is no significant redshift evolution of the relation and that the resulting average IRX-{\beta} curve is consistent with a Calzetti-like attenuation law. We compare our results with recent work in the literature, finding that discrepancies in the slope of the IRX-{\beta} relation are driven by biases in the methodology used to determine the ultraviolet slopes. Consistent results are found when IRX-{\beta} is evaluated by stacking in bins of stellar mass, M, and we argue that the near-linear IRX-M relationship is a better proxy for correcting observed UV luminosities to total star formation rates, provided an accurate handle on M can be had, and also gives clues as to the physical driver of the role of dust-obscured star formation in high-redshift galaxies.
  • We present a new measurement of the evolving galaxy far-IR luminosity function (LF) extending out to redshifts z~5, with resulting implications for the level of dust-obscured star-formation density in the young Universe. To achieve this we have exploited recent advances in sub-mm/mm imaging with SCUBA-2 on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) and the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA), which together provide unconfused imaging with sufficient dynamic range to provide meaningful coverage of the luminosity-redshift plane out to z>4. Our results support previous indications that the faint-end slope of the far-IR LF is sufficiently flat that comoving luminosity-density is dominated by bright objects (~L*). However, we find that the number-density/luminosity of such sources at high redshifts has been severely over-estimated by studies that have attempted to push the highly-confused Herschel SPIRE surveys beyond z~2. Consequently we confirm recent reports that cosmic star-formation density is dominated by UV-visible star formation at z>4. Using both direct (1/Vmax) and maximum likelihood determinations of the LF, we find that its high-redshift evolution is well characterized by continued positive luminosity evolution coupled with negative density evolution (with increasing redshift). This explains why bright sub-mm sources continue to be found at z>5, even though their integrated contribution to cosmic star-formation density at such early times is very small. The evolution of the far-IR galaxy LF thus appears similar in form to that already established for active galactic nuclei, possibly reflecting a similar dependence on the growth of galaxy mass.
  • We present a study of the low-frequency radio properties of star forming (SF) galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN) up to redshift $z=2.5$. The new spectral window probed by the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) allows us to reconstruct the radio continuum emission from 150 MHz to 1.4 GHz to an unprecedented depth for a radio-selected sample of $1542$ galaxies in $\sim 7~ \rm{deg}^2$ of the LOFAR Bo\"otes field. Using the extensive multi-wavelength dataset available in Bo\"otes and detailed modelling of the FIR to UV spectral energy distribution (SED), we are able to separate the star-formation (N=758) and the AGN (N=784) dominated populations. We study the shape of the radio SEDs and their evolution across cosmic time and find significant differences in the spectral curvature between the SF galaxy and AGN populations. While the radio spectra of SF galaxies exhibit a weak but statistically significant flattening, AGN SEDs show a clear trend to become steeper towards lower frequencies. No evolution of the spectral curvature as a function of redshift is found for SF galaxies or AGN. We investigate the redshift evolution of the infrared-radio correlation (IRC) for SF galaxies and find that the ratio of total infrared to 1.4 GHz radio luminosities decreases with increasing redshift: $ q_{\rm 1.4GHz} = (2.45 \pm 0.04) \times (1+z)^{-0.15 \pm 0.03} $. Similarly, $q_{\rm 150MHz}$ shows a redshift evolution following $ q_{\rm 150GHz} = (1.72 \pm 0.04) \times (1+z)^{-0.22 \pm 0.05}$. Calibration of the 150 MHz radio luminosity as a star formation rate tracer suggests that a single power-law extrapolation from $q_{\rm 1.4GHz}$ is not an accurate approximation at all redshifts.
  • We present the results of the first, deep ALMA imaging covering the full 4.5 sq arcmin of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) as previously imaged with WFC3/IR on HST. Using a mosaic of 45 pointings, we have obtained a homogeneous 1.3mm image of the HUDF, achieving an rms sensitivity of 35 microJy, at a resolution of 0.7 arcsec. From an initial list of ~50 >3.5sigma peaks, a rigorous analysis confirms 16 sources with flux densities S(1.3) > 120 microJy. All of these have secure galaxy counterparts with robust redshifts (<z> = 2.15), and 12 are also detected at 6GHz in new deep JVLA imaging. Due to the wealth of supporting data in this unique field, the physical properties of the ALMA sources are well constrained, including their stellar masses (M*) and UV+FIR star-formation rates (SFR). Our results show that stellar mass is the best predictor of SFR in the high-z Universe; indeed at z > 2 our ALMA sample contains 7 of the 9 galaxies in the HUDF with M* > 2 x 10^10 Msun and we detect only one galaxy at z > 3.5, reflecting the rapid drop-off of high-mass galaxies with increasing redshift. The detections, coupled with stacking, allow us to probe the redshift/mass distribution of the 1.3-mm background down to S(1.3) ~ 10 micro-Jy. We find strong evidence for a steep `main sequence' for star-forming galaxies at z ~ 2, with SFR \propto M* and a mean specific SFR = 2.2 /Gyr. Moreover, we find that ~85% of total star formation at z ~ 2 is enshrouded in dust, with ~65% of all star formation at this epoch occurring in high-mass galaxies (M* > 2 x 10^10 Msun), for which the average obscured:unobscured SF ratio is ~200. Finally, we combine our new ALMA results with the existing HST data to revisit the cosmic evolution of star-formation rate density; we find that this peaks at z ~ 2.5, and that the star-forming Universe transits from primarily unobscured to primarily obscured thereafter at z ~ 4.
  • Understanding the heating and cooling mechanisms in nearby (Ultra) luminous infrared galaxies can give us insight into the driving mechanisms in their more distant counterparts. Molecular emission lines play a crucial role in cooling excited gas, and recently, with Herschel Space Observatory we have been able to observe the rich molecular spectrum. CO is the most abundant and one of the brightest molecules in the Herschel wavelength range. CO transitions are observed with Herschel, and together, these lines trace the excitation of CO. We study Arp 299, a colliding galaxy group, with one component harboring an AGN and two more undergoing intense star formation. For Arp 299 A, we present PACS spectrometer observations of high-J CO lines up to J=20-19 and JCMT observations of $^{13}$CO and HCN to discern between UV heating and alternative heating mechanisms. There is an immediately noticeable difference in the spectra of Arp 299 A and Arp 299 B+C, with source A having brighter high-J CO transitions. This is reflected in their respective spectral energy line distributions. We find that photon-dominated regions (PDRs) are unlikely to heat all the gas since a very extreme PDR is necessary to fit the high-J CO lines. In addition, this extreme PDR does not fit the HCN observations, and the dust spectral energy distribution shows that there is not enough hot dust to match the amount expected from such an extreme PDR. Therefore, we determine that the high-J CO and HCN transitions are heated by an additional mechanism, namely cosmic ray heating, mechanical heating, or X-ray heating. We find that mechanical heating, in combination with UV heating, is the only mechanism that fits all molecular transitions. We also constrain the molecular gas mass of Arp 299 A to 3e9 Msun and find that we need 4% of the total heating to be mechanical heating, with the rest UV heating.
  • We analyse new SCUBA-2 submillimeter and archival SPIRE far-infrared imaging of a z=1.62 cluster, Cl0218.3-0510, which lies in the UKIDSS/UDS field of the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey. Combining these tracers of obscured star formation activity with the extensive photometric and spectroscopic information available for this field, we identify 31 far-infrared/submillimeter-detected probable cluster members with bolometric luminosities >1e12 Lo and show that by virtue of their dust content and activity, these represent some of the reddest and brightest galaxies in this structure. We exploit Cycle-1 ALMA submillimeter continuum imaging which covers one of these sources to confirm the identification of a SCUBA-2-detected ultraluminous star-forming galaxy in this structure. Integrating the total star-formation activity in the central region of the structure, we estimate that it is an order of magnitude higher (in a mass-normalised sense) than clusters at z~0.5-1. However, we also find that the most active cluster members do not reside in the densest regions of the structure, which instead host a population of passive and massive, red galaxies. We suggest that while the passive and active populations have comparable near-infrared luminosities at z=1.6, M(H)~-23, the subsequent stronger fading of the more active galaxies means that they will evolve into passive systems at the present-day which are less luminous than the descendants of those galaxies which were already passive at z~1.6 (M(H)~-20.5 and M(H)~-21.5 respectively at z~0). We conclude that the massive galaxy population in the dense cores of present-day clusters were already in place at z=1.6 and that in Cl0218.3-0510 we are seeing continuing infall of less extreme, but still ultraluminous, star-forming galaxies onto a pre-existing structure.
  • Context: Molecular data of extreme environments, such as Arp 220, but also NGC 253, show evidence for extremely high cosmic ray (CR) rates (10^3-10^4 * Milky Way) and mechanical heating from supernova driven turbulence. Aims: The consequences of high CR rates and mechanical heating on the chemistry in clouds are explored. Methods: PDR model predictions are made for low, n=10^3, and high, n=10^5.5 cm^-3, density clouds using well-tested chemistry and radiation transfer codes. Column densities of relevant species are discussed, and special attention is given to water related species. Fluxes are shown for fine-structure lines of O, C+, C, and N+, and molecular lines of CO, HCN, HNC, and HCO+. A comparison is made to an X-ray dominated region model. Results: Fine-structure lines of [CII], [CI], and [OI] are remarkably similar for different mechanical heating and CR rates, when already exposed to large amounts of UV. HCN and H2O abundances are boosted for very high mechanical heating rates, while ionized species are relatively unaffected. OH+ and H2O+ are enhanced for very high CR rates zeta > 5 * 10^-14 s^-1. A combination of OH+, OH, H2O+, H2O, and H3O+ trace the CR rates, and are able to distinguish between enhanced cosmic rays and X-rays.
  • We present observations of the rotational ortho-water ground transition, the two lowest para-water transitions, and the ground transition of ionised ortho-water in the archetypal starburst galaxy M82, performed with the HIFI instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory. These observations are the first detections of the para-H2O(111-000) (1113\,GHz) and ortho-H2O+(111-000) (1115\,GHz) lines in an extragalactic source. All three water lines show different spectral line profiles, underlining the need for high spectral resolution in interpreting line formation processes. Using the line shape of the para-H2O(111-000) and ortho-H2O+(111-000) absorption profile in conjunction with high spatial resolution CO observations, we show that the (ionised) water absorption arises from a ~2000 pc^2 region within the HIFI beam located about ~50 pc east of the dynamical centre of the galaxy. This region does not coincide with any of the known line emission peaks that have been identified in other molecular tracers, with the exception of HCO. Our data suggest that water and ionised water within this region have high (up to 75%) area-covering factors of the underlying continuum. This indicates that water is not associated with small, dense cores within the ISM of M82 but arises from a more widespread diffuse gas component.
  • We present high resolution HIFI spectroscopy of the nucleus of the archetypical starburst galaxy M82. Six 12CO lines, 2 13CO lines and 4 fine-structure lines are detected. Besides showing the effects of the overall velocity structure of the nuclear region, the line profiles also indicate the presence of multiple components with different optical depths, temperatures and densities in the observing beam. The data have been interpreted using a grid of PDR models. It is found that the majority of the molecular gas is in low density (n=10^3.5 cm^-3) clouds, with column densities of N_H=10^21.5 cm^-2 and a relatively low UV radiation field (GO = 10^2). The remaining gas is predominantly found in clouds with higher densities (n=10^5 cm^-3) and radiation fields (GO = 10^2.75), but somewhat lower column densities (N_H=10^21.2 cm^-2). The highest J CO lines are dominated by a small (1% relative surface filling) component, with an even higher density (n=10^6 cm^-3) and UV field (GO = 10^3.25). These results show the strength of multi-component modeling for the interpretation of the integrated properties of galaxies.
  • We present a full high resolution SPIRE FTS spectrum of the nearby ultraluminous infrared galaxy Mrk231. In total 25 lines are detected, including CO J=5-4 through J=13-12, 7 rotational lines of H2O, 3 of OH+ and one line each of H2O+, CH+, and HF. We find that the excitation of the CO rotational levels up to J=8 can be accounted for by UV radiation from star formation. However, the approximately flat luminosity distribution of the CO lines over the rotational ladder above J=8 requires the presence of a separate source of excitation for the highest CO lines. We explore X-ray heating by the accreting supermassive black hole in Mrk231 as a source of excitation for these lines, and find that it can reproduce the observed luminosities. We also consider a model with dense gas in a strong UV radiation field to produce the highest CO lines, but find that this model strongly overpredicts the hot dust mass in Mrk231. Our favoured model consists of a star forming disk of radius 560 pc, containing clumps of dense gas exposed to strong UV radiation, dominating the emission of CO lines up to J=8. X-rays from the accreting supermassive black hole in Mrk231 dominate the excitation and chemistry of the inner disk out to a radius of 160 pc, consistent with the X-ray power of the AGN in Mrk231. The extraordinary luminosity of the OH+ and H2O+ lines reveals the signature of X-ray driven excitation and chemistry in this region.
  • We have determined the luminosity function of 250um-selected galaxies detected in the ~14 sq.deg science demonstration region of the Herschel-ATLAS project out to a redshift of z=0.5. Our findings very clearly show that the luminosity function evolves steadily out to this redshift. By selecting a sub-group of sources within a fixed luminosity interval where incompleteness effects are minimal, we have measured a smooth increase in the comoving 250um luminosity density out to z=0.2 where it is 3.6+1.4-0.9 times higher than the local value.
  • We present a derivation of the star formation rate per comoving volume of quasar host galaxies, derived from stacking analyses of far-infrared to mm-wave photometry of quasars with redshifts 0<z<6 and absolute I-band magnitudes -22>I_AB>-32. We use the science demonstration observations of the first ~16 deg^2 from the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) in which there are 240 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and a further 171 from the 2dF-SDSS LRG and QSO (2SLAQ) survey. We supplement this data with a compilation of data from IRAS, ISO, Spitzer, SCUBA and MAMBO. H-ATLAS alone statistically detects the quasars in its survey area at >5sigma at 250, 350 and 500um. From the compilation as a whole we find striking evidence of downsizing in quasar host galaxy formation: low-luminosity quasars with absolute magnitudes in the range -22>I_AB>-24 have a comoving star formation rate (derived from 100um rest-frame luminosities) peaking between redshifts of 1 and 2, while high-luminosity quasars with I_AB<-26 have a maximum contribution to the star formation density at z~3. The volume-averaged star formation rate of -22>I_AB>-24 quasars evolves as (1+z)^{2.3 +/- 0.7} at z<2, but the evolution at higher luminosities is much faster reaching (1+z)^{10 +/- 1} at -26>I_AB>-28. We tentatively interpret this as a combination of a declining major merger rate with time and gas consumption reducing fuel for both black hole accretion and star formation.
  • We discuss the use of SPICA to study the cosmic history of star formation and accretion by supermassive black holes. The cooling lines, in particular the high-J rotational lines of CO, provide a clear-cut and unique diagnostic for separating the contributions of star formation and AGN accretion to the total infrared luminosity of active, gas-rich galaxies. We briefly review existing efforts for studying high-J CO emission from galaxies at low and high redshift. We finally comment on the detectability of cooling radiation from primordial (very low metallicity) galaxies containing an accreting supermassive black hole with SPICA/SAFARI.
  • We present a sensitive 870 micron survey of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS) using LABOCA on the APEX telescope. The LABOCA ECDFS Submillimetre Survey (LESS) covers the full 30' x 30' field size of the ECDFS and has a uniform noise level of 1.2 mJy/beam. LESS is thus the largest contiguous deep submillimetre survey undertaken to date. The noise properties of our map show clear evidence that we are beginning to be affected by confusion noise. We present a catalog of 126 SMGs detected with a significance level above 3.7 sigma. The ECDFS exhibits a deficit of bright SMGs relative to previously studied blank fields but not of normal star-forming galaxies that dominate the extragalactic background light (EBL). This is in line with the underdensities observed for optically defined high redshift source populations in the ECDFS (BzKs, DRGs,optically bright AGN and massive K-band selected galaxies). The differential source counts in the full field are well described by a power law with a slope of alpha=-3.2, comparable to the results from other fields. We show that the shape of the source counts is not uniform across the field. The integrated 870 micron flux densities of our source-count models account for >65% of the estimated EBL from COBE measurements. We have investigated the clustering of SMGs in the ECDFS by means of a two-point correlation function and find evidence for strong clustering on angular scales <1'. Assuming a power law dependence for the correlation function and a typical redshift distribution for the SMGs we derive a spatial correlation length of r_0=13+/-6 h^-1 Mpc.
  • Context: Submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) are distant, dusty galaxies undergoing star formation at prodigious rates. Recently there has been major progress in understanding the nature of the bright SMGs (i.e. S(850um)>5mJy). The samples for the fainter SMGs are small and are currently in a phase of being built up through identification studies. Aims: We study the molecular gas content in two SMGs, SMMJ163555 and SMMJ163541, at z=1.034 and z=3.187 with unlensed submm fluxes of 0.4mJy and 6.0mJy. Both SMGs are gravitationally lensed by the foreground cluster A2218. Methods: IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometry observations at 3mm were obtained for the lines CO(2-1) for SMMJ163555 and CO(3-2) for SMMJ163541. Additionally we obtained CO(4-3) for the candidate z=4.048 SMMJ163556 with an unlensed submm flux of 2.7mJy. Results: CO(2-1) was detected for SMMJ163555 at z=1.0313 with an integrated line intensity of 1.2+-0.2Jy km/s and a line width of 410+-120 km/s. From this a gas mass of 1.6x10^9 Msun is derived and a star formation efficiency of 440Lsun/Msun is estimated. CO(3-2) was detected for SMMJ163541 at z=3.1824, possibly with a second component at z=3.1883, with an integrated line intensity of 1.0+-0.1 Jy km/s and a line width of 280+-50 km/s. From this a gas mass of 2.2x10^10 Msun is derived and a star formation efficiency of 1000 Lsun/Msun is estimated. For SMMJ163556 the CO(4-3) is undetected within the redshift range 4.035-4.082 down to a sensitivity of 0.15 Jy km/s. Conclusions: Our CO line observations confirm the optical redshifts for SMMJ163555 and SMMJ163541. The CO line luminosity L'_CO for both galaxies is consistent with the L_FIR-L'_CO relation. SMMJ163555 has the lowest FIR luminosity of all SMGs with a known redshift and is one of the few high redshift LIRGs whose properties can be estimated prior to ALMA.
  • We present a determination of the mass of the supermassive black hole (BH) and the nuclear stellar orbital distribution of the elliptical galaxy Centaurus A (NGC5128) using high-resolution integral-field observations of the stellar kinematics. The observations were obtained with SINFONI at the ESO Very Large Telescope in the near-infrared (K-band), using adaptive optics to correct for the blurring effect of the earth atmosphere. The data have a spatial resolution of 0.17" FWHM and high S/N>80 per spectral pixel so that the shape of the stellar line-of-sight velocity-distribution can be reliably extracted. We detect clear low-level stellar rotation, which is counter-rotating with respect to the gas. We fit axisymmetric three-integral dynamical models to the data to determine the best fitting values for the BH mass M_BH=(5.5+/-3.0)*10^7 Msun (3sigma errors) and (M/L)_K=(0.65+/-0.15) in solar units. These values are in excellent agreement with previous determinations from the gas kinematics, and in particular with our own published values, extracted from the same data. This provides one of the cleanest gas versus stars comparisons of BH determination, due to the use of integral-field data for both dynamical tracers and due to a very well resolved BH sphere of influence R_BH~0.70". We derive an accurate profile of the orbital anisotropy and we carefully test its reliability using spherical Jeans models with radially varying anisotropy. We find an increase in the tangential anisotropy close to the BH, but the spatial extent of this effect seems restricted to the size of R_BH instead of that R_b~3.9" of the core in the surface brightness profile, contrary to detailed predictions of current simulations of the binary BH scouring mechanism. More realistic simulations would be required to draw conclusions from this observation.
  • We have conducted a submillimetre mapping survey of faint, gravitationally lensed sources, where we have targeted twelve galaxy clusters and additionally the NTT Deep Field. The total area surveyed is 71.5 arcmin^2 in the image plane; correcting for gravitational lensing, the total area surveyed is 40 arcmin^2 in the source plane for a typical source redshift z=2.5. In the deepest maps, an image plane depth of 1sigma r.m.s. ~0.8 mJy is reached. This survey is the largest survey to date to reach such depths. In total 59 sources were detected, including three multiply-imaged sources. The gravitational lensing makes it possible to detect sources with flux density below the blank field confusion limit. The lensing corrected fluxes ranges from 0.11 mJy to 19 mJy. After correcting for multiplicity there are 10 sources with fluxes <2 mJy of which 7 have sub-mJy fluxes, doubling the number of such sources known. Number counts are determined below the confusion limit. At 1 mJy the integrated number count is ~10^4 deg^-2, and at 0.5 mJy it is ~2x10^4 deg^-2. Based on the number counts, at a source plan flux limit of 0.1 mJy, essentially all of the 850um background emission has been resolved. The dominant contribution (> 50 per cent) to the integrated background arises from sources with fluxes S(850) between 0.4 and 2.5 mJy, while the bright sources S(850) > 6mJy contribute only 10 per cent.
  • Extracting sources with low signal-to-noise from maps with structured background is a non-trivial task which has become important in studying the faint end of the submillimetre number counts. In this article we study source extraction from submillimetre jiggle-maps from the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) using the Mexican Hat Wavelet (MHW), an isotropic wavelet technique. As a case study we use a large (11.8 arcmin^2) jiggle-map of the galaxy cluster Abell 2218, with a 850um 1sigma r.m.s. sensitivity of 0.6-1mJy. We show via simulations that MHW is a powerful tool for reliable extraction of low signal-to-noise sources from SCUBA jiggle-maps and nine sources are detected in the A2218 850um image. Three of these sources are identified as images of a single background source with an unlensed flux of 0.8mJy. Further, two single-imaged sources also have unlensed fluxes <2mJy, below the blank-field confusion limit. In this ultradeep map, the individual sources detected resolve nearly all of the extragalactic background light at 850um, and the deep data allow to put an upper limit of 44 sources per arcmin^2 to 0.2mJy at 850um.
  • A 850 micron map of the interacting spiral galaxy M51 shows well-defined spiral arms, closely resembling the structures seen in CO and HI emission. However, most of the 850 micron emission originates in an underlying exponential disk, a component that has not been observed before in a face-on galaxy at these wavelengths. The scale-length of this disk is 5.45 kpc, which is somewhat larger than the scale-length of the stellar disk, but somewhat smaller than that of atomic hydrogen. Its profile can not be explained solely by a radial disk temperature gradient but requires the underlying dust to have an exponential distribution as well. This reinforces the view that the submm emission from spiral galaxy disks traces total hydrogen column density, i.e.the sum of H2 and HI. A canonical gas-to-dust ratio of 100+/-26 is obtained for kappa(850)=1.2 g**-1 cm**2, where kappa(850) is the dust opacity at 850 micron.
  • We present N-body/SPH simulations of the evolution of an isolated dwarf galaxy including a detailed model for the ISM, star formation and stellar feedback. Depending on the strength of the feedback, the modelled dwarf galaxy shows periodic or quasi-periodic bursts of star formation of moderate strength. The period of the variations is related to the dynamical timescale, of the order of $1.5~10^8$ yr. We show that the results of these simulations are in good agreement with recent detailed observations of dwarf irregulars (dIrr) and that the peculiar kinematic and morphological properties of these objects,as revealed by high resolution HI studies, are fully reproduced. We discuss these results in the context of recent surveys of dwarf galaxies and point out that if the star formation pattern of our model galaxy is typical for dwarf irregulars this could explain the scatter of observed properties of dwarf galaxies. Specifically, we show that the time sampled distribution of the ratio between the instanteneous star formation rate (SFR) and the mean SFR is similar to that distribution in observed sample of dwarf galaxies.
  • We have conducted a new deep SCUBA survey, which has targetted 12 lensing galaxy clusters and one blank field. In this survey we have detected several sub-mJy sources after correcting for the gravitational lensing by the intervening clusters. We here present the preliminary results and point out two highlights.
  • We present a spectroscopic analysis of 21 galaxies with z=0.2-1.5 drawn from a 25 sq. arcmin ultra-deep 15 micron ISOCAM survey centered in the HDFS. VLT/ISAAC spectra are reported for 18 sources, aimed at detecting the redshifted Ha. Optical data come from VLT/FORS2 and NTT/EMMI. Ha line emission is detected in all the observed objects. Our analysis of emission lines, morphology, and SEDs shows evidence for AGN in only two of these sources. The Ha luminosities indicate star formation rates (SFR) between 0.5 and 20 Msun, without extinction corrections. We find good correlations between the mid-IR, the radio and Ha luminosities, confirming the mid-IR light as a good tracer of star formation (while SFR based on Ha flux show large scatter and offset, still to be understood). We have estimated the baryonic masses in stars by fitting the optical-IR SED, and found that the host galaxies of ISO sources are massive members of groups with SFR=10 to 300 Msun/yr. We have finally compared this ongoing SF activity with the already formed stellar masses to estimate the timescales t(SF) for the stellar build-up, which turn-out to be widely spread between 0.1 Gyrs to more than 10 Gyr. The faint ISOCAM galaxies appear to form a composite population, including moderately active but very massive spiral-like galaxies, and very luminous ongoing starbursts, in a continuous sequence. From the observed t(SF), assuming typical starburst timescales, we infer that, with few exceptions, only a fraction of the galactic stars can be formed in any single starburst, while several of such episodes during a protracted SF history are required for the whole galactic build-up.
  • We present results from a deep mid-infrared survey of the Hubble Deep Field South (HDF-S) region performed at 7 and 15 micron with the CAM instrument on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). The final map in each band was constructed by the coaddition of four independent rasters, registered using bright sources securely detected in all rasters, with the absolute astrometry being defined by a radio source detected at both 7 and 15 micron. We sought detections of bright sources in a circular region of radius 2.5 arcmin at the centre of each map, in a manner that simulations indicated would produce highly reliable and complete source catalogues using simple selection criteria. Merging source lists in the two bands yielded a catalogue of 35 distinct sources, which we calibrated photometrically using photospheric models of late-type stars detected in our data. We present extragalactic source count results in both bands, and discuss the constraints they impose on models of galaxy evolution models, given the volume of space sampled by this galaxy population.
  • We present results from a deep mid-IR survey of the Hubble Deep Field South (HDF-S) region performed at 7 and 15um with the CAM instrument on board ISO. We found reliable optical/near-IR associations for 32 of the 35 sources detected in this field by Oliver et al. (2002, Paper I): eight of them were identified as stars, one is definitely an AGN, a second seems likely to be an AGN, too, while the remaining 22 appear to be normal spiral or starburst galaxies. Using model spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of similar galaxies, we compare methods for estimating the star formation rates (SFRs) in these objects, finding that an estimator based on integrated (3-1000um) IR luminosity reproduces the model SFRs best. Applying this estimator to model fits to the SEDs of our 22 spiral and starburst galaxies, we find that they are forming stars at rates of ~1-100 M_sol/yr, with a median value of ~40M_sol/yr, assuming an Einstein - de Sitter universe with a Hubble constant of 50 km/s/Mpc, and star formation taking place according to a Salpeter (1955) IMF across the mass range 0.1-100M_sol. We split the redshift range 0.0<z<0.6 into two equal-volume bins to compute raw estimates of the star formation rate density contributed by these sources, assuming the same cosmology and IMF as above and computing errors based on estimated uncertainties in the SFRs of individual galaxies. We compare these results with other estimates of the SFR density made with the same assumptions, showing them to be consistent with the results of Flores et al. (1999) from their ISO survey of the CFRS 1415+52 field. However, the relatively small volume of our survey means that our SFR density estimates suffer from a large sampling variance, implying that our results, by themselves, do not place tight constraints on the global mean SFR density.