• We construct a hierarchy of integrable systems whose Poisson structure corresponds to the BMS$_{3}$ algebra, and then discuss its description in terms of the Riemannian geometry of locally flat spacetimes in three dimensions. The analysis is performed in terms of two-dimensional gauge fields for $isl(2,R)$. Although the algebra is not semisimple, the formulation can be carried out \`a la Drinfeld-Sokolov because it admits a nondegenerate invariant bilinear metric. The hierarchy turns out to be bi-Hamiltonian, labeled by a nonnegative integer $k$, and defined through a suitable generalization of the Gelfand-Dikii polynomials. The symmetries of the hierarchy are explicitly found. For $k\geq 1$, the corresponding conserved charges span an infinite-dimensional Abelian algebra without central extensions, and they are in involution; while in the case of $k=0$, they generate the BMS$_{3}$ algebra. In the special case of $k=1$, by virtue of a suitable field redefinition and time scaling, the field equations are shown to be equivalent to a specific type of the Hirota-Satsuma coupled KdV systems. For $k\geq 1$, the hierarchy also includes the so-called perturbed KdV equations as a particular case. A wide class of analytic solutions is also explicitly constructed for a generic value of $k$. Remarkably, the dynamics can be fully geometrized so as to describe the evolution of spacelike surfaces embedded in locally flat spacetimes. Indeed, General Relativity in 3D can be endowed with a suitable set of boundary conditions, so that the Einstein equations precisely reduce to the ones of the hierarchy aforementioned. The symmetries of the integrable systems then arise as diffeomorphisms that preserve the asymptotic form of the spacetime metric, and therefore, they become Noetherian. The infinite set of conserved charges is recovered from the corresponding surface integrals in the canonical approach.
  • In this paper we study static spherically symmetric wormhole solutions sustained by matter sources with isotropic pressure. We show that such spherical wormholes do not exist in the framework of zero-tidal-force wormholes. On the other hand, it is shown that for the often used power-law shape function there is no spherically symmetric traversable wormholes sustained by sources with a linear equation of state $p=\omega \rho$ for the isotropic pressure, independently of the form of the redshift function $\phi(r)$. We consider a solution obtained by Tolman at 1939 for describing static spheres of isotropic fluids, and show that it also may describe wormhole spacetimes with a power-law redshift function, which leads to a polynomial shape function, generalizing a power-law shape function, and inducing a solid angle deficit.
  • In this paper we study classical general relativistic static wormhole configurations with pseudo-spherical symmetry. We show that in addition to the hyperbolic wormhole solutions discussed by Lobo and Mimoso in the Ref. Phys.\ Rev.\ D {\bf 82}, 044034 (2010), there exists another wormhole class, which is truly pseudo-spherical counterpart of spherical Morris-Thorne wormhole (contrary to the Lobo-Mimoso wormhole class), since all constraints originally defined by Morris and Thorne for spherically symmetric wormholes are satisfied. We show that, for both classes of hyperbolic wormholes the energy density, at the throat, is always negative, while the radial pressure is positive, contrary to the spherically symmetric Morris-Thorne wormhole. Specific hyperbolic wormholes are constructed and discussed by imposing different conditions for the radial and lateral pressures, or by considering restricted choices for the redshift and the shape functions. In particular, we show that an hyperbolic wormhole can not be sustained at the throat by phantom energy, and that there are pseudo-spherically symmetric wormholes supported by matter with isotropic pressure and characterized by space sections with an angle deficit (or excess).
  • Understanding brain connectivity has become one of the most important issues in neuroscience. But connectivity data can reflect either the functional relationships of the brain activities or the anatomical properties between brain areas. Although one should expect a clear relationship between both representations it is not straightforward. Here we present a formalism that allows for the comparison of structural (DTI) and functional (fMRI) networks by embedding both in a common metric space. In this metric space one can then find for which regions the two networks are significantly different. Our methodology can be used not only to compare multimodal networks but also to extract statistically significant aggregated networks of a set of subjects. Actually, we use this procedure to aggregate a set of functional (fMRI) networks from different subjects in an aggregated network that is compared with the anatomical (DTI) connectivity. The comparison of the aggregated network reveals some features that are not observed when the comparison is done with the classical averaged network.
  • We have developed a first of its kind methodology for deriving bandwidth prices for premium direct peering between Access ISPs (A-ISPs) and Content and Service Providers (CSPs) that want to deliver content and services in premium quality. Our methodology establishes a direct link between service profitability, e.g., from advertising, user- and subscriber-loyalty, interconnection costs, and finally bandwidth price for peering. Unlike existing work in both the networking and economics literature, our resulting computational model built around Nash bargaining, can be used for deriving quantitative results comparable to actual market prices. We analyze the US market and derive prices for video that compare favorably with existing prices for transit and paid peering. We also observe that the fair prices returned by the model for high-profit/low-volume services such as search, are orders of magnitude higher than current bandwidth prices. This implies that resolving existing (fierce) interconnection tussles may require per service, instead of wholesale, peering between A-ISPs and CSPs. Our model can be used for deriving initial benchmark prices for such negotiations.
  • Is it possible to have a unique, recognizable style in soccer nowadays? We address this question by proposing a method to quantify the motif characteristics of soccer teams based on their pass networks. We introduce the the concept of "flow motifs" to characterize the statistically significant pass sequence patterns. It extends the idea of the network motifs, highly significant subgraphs that usually consists of three or four nodes. The analysis of the motifs in the pass networks allows us to compare and differentiate the styles of different teams. Although most teams tend to apply homogenous style, surprisingly, a unique strategy of soccer exists. Specifically, FC Barcelona's famous tiki-taka does not consist of uncountable random passes but rather has a precise, finely constructed structure.
  • The Imaging and Slitless Spectroscopy Instrument (ISSIS) will be flown as part of the Science Instrumentation in the World Space Observatory-Ultraviolet (WSO-UV). ISSIS will be the first UV imager to operate in a high Earth orbit from a 2-m class space telescope. In this contribution, the science driving to ISSIS design, as well as main characteristics of ISSIS are presented.
  • Online Social Networks (OSNs) have witnessed a tremendous growth the last few years, becoming a platform for online users to communicate, exchange content and even find employment. The emergence of OSNs has attracted researchers and analysts and much data-driven research has been conducted. However, collecting data-sets is non-trivial and sometimes it is difficult for data-sets to be shared between researchers. The main contribution of this paper is a framework called SONG (Social Network Write Generator) to generate synthetic traces of write activity on OSNs. We build our framework based on a characterization study of a large Twitter data-set and identifying the important factors that need to be accounted for. We show how one can generate traces with SONG and validate it by comparing against real data. We discuss how one can extend and use SONG to explore different `what-if' scenarios. We build a Twitter clone using 16 machines and Cassandra. We then show by example the usefulness of SONG by stress-testing our implementation. We hope that SONG is used by researchers and analysts for their own work that involves write activity.
  • A substantial amount of work has recently gone into localizing BitTorrent traffic within an ISP in order to avoid excessive and often times unnecessary transit costs. Several architectures and systems have been proposed and the initial results from specific ISPs and a few torrents have been encouraging. In this work we attempt to deepen and scale our understanding of locality and its potential. Looking at specific ISPs, we consider tens of thousands of concurrent torrents, and thus capture ISP-wide implications that cannot be appreciated by looking at only a handful of torrents. Secondly, we go beyond individual case studies and present results for the top 100 ISPs in terms of number of users represented in our dataset of up to 40K torrents involving more than 3.9M concurrent peers and more than 20M in the course of a day spread in 11K ASes. We develop scalable methodologies that permit us to process this huge dataset and answer questions such as: "\emph{what is the minimum and the maximum transit traffic reduction across hundreds of ISPs?}", "\emph{what are the win-win boundaries for ISPs and their users?}", "\emph{what is the maximum amount of transit traffic that can be localized without requiring fine-grained control of inter-AS overlay connections?}", "\emph{what is the impact to transit traffic from upgrades of residential broadband speeds?}".
  • Online Social Networks (OSNs) have exploded in terms of scale and scope over the last few years. The unprecedented growth of these networks present challenges in terms of system design and maintenance. One way to cope with this is by partitioning such large networks and assigning these partitions to different machines. However, social networks possess unique properties that make the partitioning problem non-trivial. The main contribution of this paper is to understand different properties of social networks and how these properties can guide the choice of a partitioning algorithm. Using large scale measurements representing real OSNs, we first characterize different properties of social networks, and then we evaluate qualitatively different partitioning methods that cover the design space. We expose different trade-offs involved and understand them in light of properties of social networks. We show that a judicious choice of a partitioning scheme can help improve performance.