• The nature of dark matter remains one of the key science questions. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are among the best motivated particle physics candidates, allowing to explain the measured dark matter density by employing standard big-bang thermodynamics. Examples include the lightest supersymmetric particle, though many alternative particles have been suggested as a solution to the dark matter puzzle. We introduce here a radically new version of the widely used DarkSUSY package, which allows to compute the properties of such dark matter particles numerically. With DarkSUSY 6 one can accurately predict a large variety of astrophysical signals from dark matter, such as direct detection in low-background counting experiments and indirect detection through antiprotons, antideuterons, gamma rays and positrons from the Galactic halo, or high-energy neutrinos from the center of the Earth or of the Sun. For WIMPs, high-precision tools are provided for the computation of the relic density in the Universe today, as well as for the size of the smallest dark matter protohalos. Compared to earlier versions, DarkSUSY 6 introduces many significant physics improvements and extensions. The most fundamental new feature of this release, however, is that the code has been completely re-organized and brought into a highly modular and flexible shape. Switching between different pre-implemented dark matter candidates has thus become straight-forward, just as adding new -- WIMP or non-WIMP -- particle models or replacing any given functionality in a fully user-specified way. In this article, we describe the physics behind the computer package, along with the main structure and philosophy of this major revision of DarkSUSY. A detailed manual is provided together with the public release at http://www.darksusy.org.
  • If dark matter is composed of weakly interacting particles, Earth's orbital motion may induce a small annual variation in the rate at which these particles interact in a terrestrial detector. The DAMA collaboration has identified at a 9.3$\sigma$ confidence level such an annual modulation in their event rate over two detector iterations, DAMA/NaI and DAMA/LIBRA, each with $\sim7$ years of observations. We statistically examine the time dependence of the modulation amplitudes, which "by eye" appear to be decreasing with time in certain energy ranges. We perform a chi-squared goodness of fit test of the average modulation amplitudes measured\ by the two detector iterations which rejects the hypothesis of a consistent modulation amplitude at greater than 80\%, 96\%, and 99.6\% for the 2--4~keVee, 2--5~keVee and 2--6~keVee energy ranges, respectively. We also find that among the 14 annual cycles there are three $\gtrsim 3\sigma$ departures from the average in the 5-6~keVee energy range. In addition, we examined several phenomenological models for the time dependence of the modulation amplitude. Using a maximum likelihood test, we find that descriptions of the modulation amplitude as decreasing with time are preferred over a constant modulation amplitude at anywhere between 1$\sigma$ and 3$\sigma$, depending on the phenomenological model for the time dependence and the signal energy range considered. A time dependent modulation amplitude is not expected for a dark matter signal, at least for dark matter halo morphologies consistent with the DAMA signal. New data from DAMA/LIBRA--phase2 will certainly aid in determining whether any apparent time dependence is a real effect or a statistical fluctuation.
  • We present a halo-independent determination of the unmodulated signal corresponding to the DAMA modulation if interpreted as due to dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). First we show how a modulated signal gives information on the WIMP velocity distribution function in the Galactic rest frame, from which the unmodulated signal descends. Then we perform a mathematically-sound profile likelihood analysis in which we profile the likelihood over a continuum of nuisance parameters (namely, the WIMP velocity distribution). As a first application of the method, which is very general and valid for any class of velocity distributions, we restrict the analysis to velocity distributions that are isotropic in the Galactic frame. In this way we obtain halo-independent maximum-likelihood estimates and confidence intervals for the DAMA unmodulated signal. We find that the estimated unmodulated signal is in line with expectations for a WIMP-induced modulation and is compatible with the DAMA background+signal rate. Specifically, for the isotropic case we find that the modulated amplitude ranges between a few percent and about 25% of the unmodulated amplitude, depending on the WIMP mass.
  • Directional dark matter detection attempts to measure the direction of motion of nuclei recoiling after having interacted with dark matter particles in the halo of our Galaxy. Due to Earth's motion with respect to the Galaxy, the dark matter flux is concentrated around a preferential direction. An anisotropy in the recoil direction rate is expected as an unmistakable signature of dark matter. The average nuclear recoil direction is expected to coincide with the average direction of dark matter particles arriving to Earth. Here we point out that for a particular type of dark matter, inelastic exothermic dark matter, the mean recoil direction as well as a secondary feature, a ring of maximum recoil rate around the mean recoil direction, could instead be opposite to the average dark matter arrival direction. Thus, the detection of an average nuclear recoil direction opposite to the usually expected direction would constitute a spectacular experimental confirmation of this type of dark matter.
  • There are various definitions of right and left polar decompositions of an $m\times n$ matrix $F \in \mathbb{K}^{m\times n}$ (where $\mathbb{K}=\mathbb{C}$ or $\mathbb{R}$) with respect to bilinear or sesquilinear products defined by nonsingular matrices $M\in \mathbb{K}^{m\times m}$ and $N\in \mathbb{K}^{n\times n}$. The existence and uniqueness of such decompositions under various assumptions on $F$, $M$, and $N$ have been studied. Here we introduce a new form of right and left polar decompositions, $F=WS$ and $F=S'W'$, respectively, where the matrix $W$ has orthonormal columns ($W'$ has orthonormal rows) with respect to suitably defined scalar products which are functions of $M$, $N$, and $F$, and the matrix $S$ is selfadjoint with respect to the same suitably defined scalar products and has eigenvalues only in the open right half-plane. We show that our right and left decompositions exist and are unique for any nonsingular matrices $M$ and $N$ when the matrix $F$ satisfies $(F^{[M,N]})^{[N,M]}=F$ and $F^{[M,N]}F$ ($FF^{[M,N]}$, respectively) is nonsingular, where $F^{[M,N]}=N^{-1} F^\# M$ with $F^\#=F^T$ for real or complex bilinear forms and $F^\#=\bar{F}^T$ for sesquilinear forms. When $M=N$, our results apply to nonsingular square matrices $F$. Our assumptions on $F$, $M$, and $N$ are in some respects weaker and in some respects stronger than those of previous work on polar decompositions.
  • We show that any nonsingular (real or complex) square matrix can be factorized into a product of at most three normal matrices, one of which is unitary, another selfadjoint with eigenvalues in the open right half-plane, and the third one is normal involutory with a neutral negative eigenspace (we call the latter matrices normal neutral involutory). Here the words normal, unitary, selfadjoint and neutral are understood with respect to an indefinite inner product.
  • We study the kinetic decoupling of light (lesssim 10 GeV) magnetic dipole dark matter (DM). We find that present bounds from collider, direct DM searches, and structure formation allow magnetic dipole DM to remain in thermal equilibrium with the early universe plasma until as late as the electron-positron annihilation epoch. This late kinetic decoupling leads to a minimal mass for the earliest dark protohalos of thousands of solar masses, in contrast to the conventional weak scale DM scenario where they are of order 10^{-6} solar masses.
  • We extend and correct a recently proposed maximum-likelihood halo-independent method to analyze unbinned direct dark matter detection data. Instead of the recoil energy as independent variable we use the minimum speed a dark matter particle must have to impart a given recoil energy to a nucleus. This has the advantage of allowing us to apply the method to any type of target composition and interaction, e.g. with general momentum and velocity dependence, and with elastic or inelastic scattering. We prove the method and provide a rigorous statistical interpretation of the results. As first applications, we find that for dark matter particles with elastic spin-independent interactions and neutron to proton coupling ratio $f_n/f_p=-0.7$, the WIMP interpretation of the signal observed by CDMS-II-Si is compatible with the constraints imposed by all other experiments with null results. We also find a similar compatibility for exothermic inelastic spin-independent interactions with $f_n/f_p=-0.8$.
  • The effective theory of isoscalar dark matter-nucleon interactions mediated by heavy spin-one or spin-zero particles depends on 10 coupling constants besides the dark matter particle mass. Here we compare this 11-dimensional effective theory to current observations in a comprehensive statistical analysis of several direct detection experiments, including the recent LUX, SuperCDMS and CDMSlite results. From a multidimensional scan with about 3 million likelihood evaluations, we extract the marginalized posterior probability density functions (a Bayesian approach) and the profile likelihoods (a frequentist approach), as well as the associated credible regions and confidence levels, for each coupling constant vs dark matter mass and for each pair of coupling constants. We compare the Bayesian and frequentist approach in the light of the currently limited amount of data. We find that current direct detection data contain sufficient information to simultaneously constrain not only the familiar spin-independent and spin-dependent interactions, but also the remaining velocity and momentum dependent couplings predicted by the dark matter-nucleon effective theory. For current experiments associated with a null result, we find strong correlations between some pairs of coupling constants. For experiments that claim a signal (i.e., CoGeNT and DAMA), we find that pairs of coupling constants produce degenerate results.
  • We compare the general effective theory of one-body dark matter nucleon interactions to current direct detection experiments in a global multidimensional statistical analysis. We derive exclusion limits on the 28 isoscalar and isovector coupling constants of the theory, and show that current data place interesting constraints on dark matter-nucleon interaction operators usually neglected in this context. We characterize the interference patterns that can arise in dark matter direct detection from pairs of dark matter-nucleon interaction operators, or from isoscalar and isovector components of the same operator. We find that commonly neglected destructive interference effects weaken standard direct detection exclusion limits by up to one order of magnitude in the coupling constants.
  • We present a general expression for the values of the average kinetic energy and of the temperature of kinetic decoupling of a WIMP, valid for any cosmological model. We show an example of the usage of our solution when the Hubble rate has a power-law dependence on temperature, and we show results for the specific cases of kination cosmology and low- temperature reheating cosmology.
  • In order to explain the fermion masses and mixings naturally, we introduce a specific flavor symmetry and mass suppression pattern that constrain the flavor structure of the fermion Yukawa couplings. Our model describes why the hierarchy of neutrino masses is milder than the hierarchy of charged fermion masses in terms of successive powers of flavon fields. We investigate CP violation and neutrinoless double beta ($0\nu\beta\beta$) decay, and show how they can be predicted and constrained in our model by present and upcoming experimental data. Our model predicts that the atmospheric neutrino mixing angle $\theta_{23}$ should be within $\sim1^{\circ}$ of $45^\circ$ for the normal neutrino mass ordering (NO), and between $\sim4^\circ$ and $\sim8^\circ$ degrees away from $45^\circ$ (in either direction) for the inverted neutrino mass ordering (IO). For both NO and IO, our model predicts that a $0\nu\beta\beta$ Majorana mass in the limited range $0.035 \text{eV}<|m_{ee}|\lesssim0.15$ eV, which can be tested in current experiments. Moreover, our model can successfully accommodate flavorless leptogenesis as the mechanism to generate the baryon asymmetry in the Universe, provided the neutrino mass ordering is normal, $|m_{ee}|\simeq0.072\pm0.012$ eV, and either $\theta_{23}\simeq44^{\circ}$ and the Dirac CP-violating phase $\delta_{CP}\simeq20^{\circ}$ or $60^{\circ}$, or $\theta_{23}\simeq46^{\circ}$ and $\delta_{CP} \simeq205^{\circ}$ or $245^{\circ}$.
  • The morphology and characteristics of the so-called GeV gamma-ray excess detected in the Milky Way lead us to speculate about a possible common origin with the 511 keV line mapped by the SPI experiment about ten years ago. In the previous version of our paper, we assumed 30 GeV dark matter particles annihilating into $b \bar{b}$ and obtained both a morphology and a 511 keV flux (\phi_{511 keV} ~ 10^{-3} ph/cm^2/s) in agreement with SPI observation. However our estimates assumed a negligible number density of electrons in the bulge which lead to an artificial increase in the flux (mostly due to negligible Coulomb losses in this configuration). Assuming a number density greater than $n_e > 10^{-3} cm^{-3}$, we now obtain a flux of 511 keV photons that is smaller than \phi_{511 keV} ~ 10^{-6} ph/cm^2/s and is essentially in agreement with the 511 keV flux that one can infer from the total number of positrons injected by dark matter annihilations into $b \bar{b}$. We thus conclude that -- even if 30 GeV dark matter particles were to exist-- it is impossible to establish a connexion between the two types of signals, even though they are located within the same 10 deg region in the galactic centre.
  • We briefly review the halo-independent formalism, that allows to compare data from different direct dark matter detection experiments without making assumptions on the properties of the dark matter halo. We apply this method to spin-independent WIMP-nuclei interactions, for both isospin-conserving and isospin-violating couplings, updating the existing analyses with the addition of the SuperCDMS bound. We point out that this method can be applied to any type of WIMP interaction.
  • We present comparisons of direct detection data for "light WIMPs" with an anapole moment interaction (ADM) and a magnetic dipole moment interaction (MDM), both assuming the Standard Halo Model (SHM) for the dark halo of our galaxy and in a halo-independent manner. In the SHM analysis we find that a combination of the 90% CL LUX and CDMSlite limits or the new 90% CL SuperCDMS limit by itself exclude the parameter space regions allowed by DAMA, CoGeNT and CDMS-II-Si data for both ADM and MDM. In our halo-independent analysis the new LUX bound excludes the same potential signal regions as the previous XENON100 bound. Much of the remaining signal regions is now excluded by SuperCDMS, while the CDMSlite limit is much above them. The situation is of strong tension between the positive and negative search results both for ADM and MDM. We also clarify the confusion in the literature about the ADM scattering cross section.
  • We reexamine the current direct dark matter data including the recent CDMSlite and LUX data, assuming that the dark matter consists of light WIMPs, with mass close to 10 GeV/$c^2$ with spin-independent and isospin-conserving or isospin-violating interactions. We compare the data with a standard model for the dark halo of our galaxy and also in a halo-independent manner. In our standard-halo analysis, we find that for isospin-conserving couplings, CDMSlite and LUX together exclude the DAMA, CoGeNT, CDMS-II-Si, and CRESST-II possible WIMP signal regions. For isospin-violating couplings instead, we find that a substantial portion of the CDMS-II-Si region is compatible with all exclusion limits. In our halo-independent analysis, we find that for isospin-conserving couplings, the situation is of strong tension between the positive and negative results, as it was before the LUX and CDMSlite bounds, which turn out to exclude the same possible WIMP signals as previous limits. For isospin-violating couplings, we find that LUX and CDMS-II-Si bounds together exclude or severely constrain the DAMA, CoGeNT and CRESST-II possible WIMP signals.
  • Astronomical observations from small galaxies to the largest scales in the universe can be consistently explained by the simple idea of dark matter. The nature of dark matter is however still unknown. Empirically it cannot be any of the known particles, and many theories postulate it as a new elementary particle. Searches for dark matter particles are under way: production at high-energy accelerators, direct detection through dark matter-nucleus scattering, indirect detection through cosmic rays, gamma rays, or effects on stars. Particle dark matter searches rely on observing an excess of events above background, and a lot of controversies have arisen over the origin of observed excesses. With the new high-quality cosmic ray measurements from the AMS-02 experiment, the major uncertainty in modeling cosmic ray fluxes is in the nuclear physics cross sections for spallation and fragmentation of cosmic rays off interstellar hydrogen and helium. The understanding of direct detection backgrounds is limited by poor knowledge of cosmic ray activation in detector materials, with order of magnitude differences between simulation codes. A scarcity of data on nucleon spin densities blurs the connection between dark matter theory and experiments. What is needed, ideally, are more and better measurements of spallation cross sections relevant to cosmic rays and cosmogenic activation, and data on the nucleon spin densities in nuclei.
  • We extend the halo-independent method to compare direct dark matter detection data, so far used only for spin-independent WIMP-nucleon interactions, to any type of interaction. As an example we apply the method to magnetic moment interactions.
  • We present a halo-independent analysis of direct detection data on "light WIMPs," i.e. weakly interacting massive particles with mass close to or below 10 GeV/c^2. We include new results from silicon CDMS detectors (bounds and excess events), the latest CoGeNT acceptances, and recent measurements of low sodium quenching factors in NaI crystals. We focus on light WIMPs with spin-independent isospin-conserving and isospin-violating interactions with nucleons. For these dark matter candidates we find that a low quenching factor would make the DAMA modulation incompatible with a reasonable escape velocity for the dark matter halo, and that the tension among experimental data tightens in both the isospin-conserving and isospin-violating scenarios. We also find that a new although milder tension appears between the CoGeNT and DAMA annual modulations on one side and the silicon excess events on the other, in that it seems difficult to interpret them as the modulated and unmodulated aspects of the same WIMP dark matter signal.
  • A resonance in the neutralino-nucleus elastic scattering cross section is usually purported when the neutralino-sbottom mass difference m_sbottom-m_chi is equal to the bottom quark mass m_b ~ 4 GeV. Such a scenario has been discussed as a viable model for light (~ 10 GeV) neutralino dark matter as explanation of possible DAMA and CoGeNT direct detection signals. Here we give physical and analytical arguments showing that the sbottom resonance may actually not be there. In particular, we show analytically that the one-loop gluon-neutralino scattering amplitude has no pole at m_sbottom=m_chi+m_b, while by analytic continuation to the regime m_sbottom<m_chi, it develops a pole at m_sbottom=m_chi-m_b. In the limit of vanishing gluon momenta, this pole corresponds to the only cut of the neutralino self-energy diagram with a quark and a squark running in the loop, when the decay process chi->squark+quark becomes kinematically allowed. The pole can be interpreted as the formation of a sbottom-antibottom-qqq or antisbottom-bottom qqq resonant state (where qqq are the nucleon valence quarks), which is kinematically not accessible if the neutralino is the LSP. Our analysis shows that the common practice of estimating the neutralino-nucleon cross section by introducing an ad-hoc pole at m_sbottom=m_chi+m_b into the effective four-fermion interaction (including higher-twist effects) should be discouraged, since it corresponds to adding a spurious pole to the scattering process at the center-of-mass energy sqrt(s) m_chi m_sbottom-m_b. Our considerations can be extended from the specific case of supersymmetry to other cases in which the dark matter particle scatters off nucleons through the exchange of a b-flavored state almost degenerate to its mass, such as in theories with extra dimensions and in other mass-degenerate dark matter scenarios recently discussed in the literature.
  • (abridged) This comment is intended to show that simulations by Smith et al. (S12) support the Dark Star (DS) scenario and even remove some potential obstacles. Our previous work illustrated that the initial hydrogen densities of the first equilibrium DSs are high, ~10^{17}/cm^3 for the case of 100 GeV WIMPs, with a stellar radius of ~2-3 AU. Subsequent authors have somehow missed the fact that equilibrium DSs have the high densities they do. S12 have numerically simulated the effect of dark matter annihilation on the contraction of a protostellar gas cloud en route to forming the first stars. They show results at a density ~5 10^{14}/cm^3, slightly higher than the value at which annihilation heating prevails over cooling. However, they are apparently unable to reach the ~10^{17}/cm^3 density of our hydrostatic DS solutions. We are in complete agreement with their physical result that the gas keeps collapsing to densities > 5 10^{14}/cm^3, as it must before equilibrium DSs can form. However we are in disagreement with some of the words in their paper which imply that DSs never come to exist. It seems to us that S12 supports the DS scenario. They use the sink particle approach to treat the gas that collapses to scales smaller than their resolution limit. We argue that their sink is effectively a DS, or contains one. An accretion disk forms as more mass falls onto the sink, and the DS grows. S12 not only confirm our predictions about DS in the range where the simulations apply, but also solve a potential obstruction to DS formation by showing that dark matter annihilation prevents the fragmentation of the collapsing gas. Whereas fragmentation might perturb the dark matter away from the DS and remove its power source, instead S12 show that further sinks, if any, form only far enough away as to leave the DS undisturbed in the comfort of its dark matter surroundings.
  • The kinetic decoupling of dark matter (DM) from the primordial plasma sets the size of the first and smallest dark matter halos. Studies of the DM kinetic decoupling have hitherto mostly neglected interactions between the DM and the quarks in the plasma. Here we illustrate their importance using two frameworks: a version of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) and an effective field theory with effective DM-quark interaction operators. We connect particle physics and astrophysics obtaining bounds on the smallest dark matter halo size from collider data and from direct dark matter search experiments. In the MSSM framework, adding DM-quark interactions to DM-lepton interactions more than doubles the smallest dark matter halo mass in a wide range of the supersymmetric parameter space.
  • The recent measurement of a non-zero neutrino mixing angle $\theta_{13}$ requires a modification of the tri-bimaximal mixing pattern that predicts a zero value for it. We propose a new neutrino mixing pattern based on a spontaneously-broken $A_{4}$ flavor symmetry and a type-I seesaw mechanism. Our model allows for approximate tri-bimaximal mixing and non-zero $\theta_{13}$, and contains a natural way to implement low and high energy CP violation in neutrino oscillations, and leptogenesis with a renormalizable Lagrangian. Both normal and inverted mass hierarchies are permitted within $3\sigma$ experimental bounds, with the prediction of small (large) deviations from maximality in the atmospheric mixing angle for the normal (inverted) case. Interestingly, we show that the inverted case is excluded by the global analysis in $1\sigma$ experimental bounds, while the most recent MINOS data seem to favor the inverted case. Our model make predictions for the Dirac CP phase in the normal and inverted hierarchies, which can be tested in near-future neutrino oscillation experiments. Our model also predicts the effective mass $|m_{ee}|$ measurable in neutrinoless double beta decay to be in the range $0.04\lesssim |m_{ee}| \lesssim 0.15$ eV for the normal hierarchy and $0.06\lesssim |m_{ee}| \lesssim 0.11$ eV for the inverted hierarchy, both of which are within the sensitivity of the next generation experiments.
  • We extend the halo-independent method of Fox, Liu, and Weiner to include energy resolution and efficiency with arbitrary energy dependence, making it more suitable for experiments to use in presenting their results. Then we compare measurements and upper limits on the direct detection of low mass ($\sim10$ GeV) weakly interacting massive particles with spin-independent interactions, including the upper limit on the annual modulation amplitude from the CDMS collaboration. We find that isospin-symmetric couplings are severely constrained both by XENON100 and CDMS bounds, and that isospin-violating couplings are still possible at the lowest energies, while the tension of the higher energy CoGeNT bins with the CDMS modulation constraint remains. We find the CRESST II signal is not compatible with the modulation signals of DAMA and CoGeNT.
  • The motion of the Earth around the Sun causes an annual change in the magnitude and direction of the arrival velocity of dark matter particles on Earth, in a way analogous to aberration of stellar light. In directional detectors, aberration of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) modulates the pattern of nuclear recoil directions in a way that depends on the orbital velocity of the Earth and the local galactic distribution of WIMP velocities. Knowing the former, WIMP aberration can give information on the latter, besides being a curious way of confirming the revolution of the Earth and the extraterrestrial provenance of WIMPs. While observing the full aberration pattern requires extremely large exposures, we claim that the annual variation of the mean recoil direction or of the event counts over specific solid angles may be detectable with moderately large exposures. For example, integrated counts over Galactic hemispheres separated by planes perpendicular to Earth's orbit would modulate annually, resulting in Galactic Hemisphere Annual Modulations (GHAM) with amplitudes larger than the usual non-directional annual modulation.