• We address the turbulent fragmentation scenario for the origin of the stellar initial mass function (IMF), using a large set of numerical simulations of randomly driven supersonic MHD turbulence. The turbulent fragmentation model successfully predicts the main features of the observed stellar IMF assuming an isothermal equation of state without any stellar feedback. As a test of the model, we focus on the case of a magnetized isothermal gas, neglecting stellar feedback, while pursuing a large dynamic range in both space and timescales covering the full spectrum of stellar masses from brown dwarfs to massive stars. Our simulations represent a generic 4 pc region within a typical Galactic molecular cloud, with a mass of 3000 Msun and an rms velocity 10 times the isothermal sound speed and 5 times the average Alfven velocity, in agreement with observations. We achieve a maximum resolution of 50 au and a maximum duration of star formation of 4.0 Myr, forming up to a thousand sink particles whose mass distribution closely matches the observed stellar IMF. A large set of medium-size simulations is used to test the sink particle algorithm, while larger simulations are used to test the numerical convergence of the IMF and the dependence of the IMF turnover on physical parameters predicted by the turbulent fragmentation model. We find a clear trend toward numerical convergence and strong support for the model predictions, including the initial time evolution of the IMF. We conclude that the physics of isothermal MHD turbulence is sufficient to explain the origin of the IMF.
  • We compute the star formation rate (SFR) in molecular clouds (MCs) that originate {\it ab initio} in a new, higher-resolution simulation of supernova-driven turbulence. Because of the large number of well-resolved clouds with self-consistent boundary and initial conditions, we obtain a large range of cloud physical parameters with realistic statistical distributions, an unprecedented sample of star-forming regions to test SFR models and to interpret observational surveys. We confirm the dependence of the SFR per free-fall time, $SFR_{\rm ff}$, on the virial parameter, $\alpha_{\rm vir}$, found in previous simulations, and compare a revised version of our turbulent fragmentation model with the numerical results. The dependences on Mach number, ${\cal M}$, gas to magnetic pressure ratio, $\beta$, and compressive to solenoidal power ratio, $\chi$ at fixed $\alpha_{\rm vir}$ are not well constrained, because of random scatter due to time and cloud-to-cloud variations in $SFR_{\rm ff}$. We find that $SFR_{\rm ff}$ in MCs can take any value in the range $0 \le SFR_{\rm ff} \lesssim 0.2$, and its probability distribution peaks at a value $SFR_{\rm ff}\approx 0.025$, consistent with observations. The values of $SFR_{\rm ff}$ and the scatter in the $SFR_{\rm ff}$--$\alpha_{\rm vir}$ relation are consistent with recent measurements in nearby MCs and in clouds near the Galactic center. Although not explicitly modeled by the theory, the scatter is consistent with the physical assumptions of our revised model and may also result in part from a lack of statistical equilibrium of the turbulence, due to the transient nature of MCs.
  • The compressibility of molecular cloud (MC) turbulence plays a crucial role in star formation models, because it controls the amplitude and distribution of density fluctuations. The relation between the compressive ratio (the ratio of powers in compressive and solenoidal motions) and the statistics of turbulence has been previously studied systematically only in idealized simulations with random external forces. In this work, we analyze a simulation of large-scale turbulence (250 pc) driven by supernova (SN) explosions that has been shown to yield realistic MC properties. We demonstrate that SN driving results in MC turbulence with a broad lognormal distribution of the compressive ratio, with a mean value $\approx 0.3$, lower than the equilibrium value of $\approx 0.5$ found in the inertial range of isothermal simulations with random solenoidal driving. We also find that the compressibility of the turbulence is not noticeably affected by gravity, nor are the mean cloud radial (expansion or contraction) and solid-body rotation velocities. Furthermore, the clouds follow a general relation between the rms density and the rms Mach number similar to that of supersonic isothermal turbulence, though with a large scatter, and their average gas density PDF is described well by a lognormal distribution, with the addition of a high-density power-law tail when self-gravity is included.
  • We present a comparison of molecular clouds (MCs) from a simulation of supernova-driven interstellar medium (ISM) turbulence with real MCs from the Outer Galaxy Survey. The radiative transfer calculations to compute synthetic CO spectra are carried out assuming the CO relative abundance depends only on gas density, according to four different models. Synthetic MCs are selected above a threshold brightness temperature value, $T_{\rm B,min}=1.4$ K, of the $J=1-0$ $^{12}$CO line, generating 16 synthetic catalogs (four different spatial resolutions and four CO abundance models), each containing up to several thousands MCs. The comparison with the observations focuses on the mass and size distributions and on the velocity-size and mass-size Larson relations. The mass and size distributions are found to be consistent with the observations, with no significant variations with spatial resolution or chemical model, except in the case of the unrealistic model with constant CO abundance. The velocity-size relation is slightly too steep for some of the models, while the mass-size relation is a bit too shallow for all models only at a spatial resolution $dx\approx 1$ pc. The normalizations of the Larson relations show a clear dependence on spatial resolution, for both the synthetic and the real MCs. The comparison of the velocity-size normalization suggests that the SN rate in the Perseus arm is approximately 70\% or less of the rate adopted in the simulation. Overall, the realistic properties of the synthetic clouds confirm that supernova-driven turbulence can explain the origin and dynamics of MCs.
  • Turbulence is ubiquitous in molecular clouds (MCs), but its origin is still unclear because MCs are usually assumed to live longer than the turbulence dissipation time. Interstellar medium (ISM) turbulence is likely driven by SN explosions, but it has never been demonstrated that SN explosions can establish and maintain a turbulent cascade inside MCs consistent with the observations. In this work, we carry out a simulation of SN-driven turbulence in a volume of (250 pc)$^3$, specifically designed to test if SN driving alone can be responsible for the observed turbulence inside MCs. We find that SN driving establishes a velocity scaling consistent with the usual scaling laws of supersonic turbulence, suggesting that previous idealized simulations of MC turbulence, driven with a random, large-scale volume force, were correctly adopted as appropriate models for MC turbulence, despite the artificial driving. We also find that the same scaling laws extend to the interior of MCs, and that the velocity-size relation of the MCs selected from our simulation is consistent with that of MCs from the Outer-Galaxy Survey, the largest MC sample available. The mass-size relation and the mass and size probability distributions also compare successfully with those of the Outer Galaxy Survey. Finally, we show that MC turbulence is super-Alfv\'{e}nic with respect to both the mean and rms magnetic-field strength. We conclude that MC structure and dynamics are the natural result of SN-driven turbulence.
  • Context: Understanding how protostars accrete their mass is a central question of star formation. One aspect of this is trying to understand whether the time evolution of accretion rates in deeply embedded objects is best characterised by a smooth decline from early to late stages or by intermittent bursts of high accretion. Aims: We create synthetic observations of deeply embedded protostars in a large numerical simulation of a molecular cloud, which are compared directly to real observations. The goal is to compare episodic accretion events in the simulation to observations and to test the methodology used for analysing the observations. Methods: Simple freeze-out and sublimation chemistry is added to the simulation, and synthetic C$^{18}$O line cubes are created for a large number of simulated protostars. The spatial extent of C$^{18}$O is measured for the simulated protostars and compared directly to a sample of 16 deeply embedded protostars observed with the Submillimeter Array. If CO is distributed over a larger area than predicted based on the protostellar luminosity, it may indicate that the luminosity has been higher in the past and that CO is still in the process of refreezing. Results: Approximately 1% of the protostars in the simulation show extended C$^{18}$O emission, as opposed to approximately 50% in the observations, indicating that the magnitude and frequency of episodic accretion events in the simulation is too low relative to observations. The protostellar accretion rates in the simulation are primarily modulated by infall from the larger scales of the molecular cloud, and do not include any disk physics. The discrepancy between simulation and observations is taken as support for the necessity of disks, even in deeply embedded objects, to produce episodic accretion events of sufficient frequency and amplitude.
  • Motivated by its importance for modeling dust particle growth in protoplanetary disks, we study turbulence-induced collision statistics of inertial particles as a function of the particle friction time, tau_p. We show that turbulent clustering significantly enhances the collision rate for particles of similar sizes with tau_p corresponding to the inertial range of the flow. If the friction time, tau_p,h, of the larger particle is in the inertial range, the collision kernel per unit cross section increases with increasing friction time, tau_p,l, of the smaller particle, and reaches the maximum at tau_p,l = tau_p,h, where the clustering effect peaks. This feature is not captured by the commonly-used kernel formula, which neglects the effect of clustering. We argue that turbulent clustering helps alleviate the bouncing barrier problem for planetesimal formation. We also investigate the collision velocity statistics using a collision-rate weighting factor to account for higher collision frequency for particle pairs with larger relative velocity. For tau_p,h in the inertial range, the rms relative velocity with collision-rate weighting is found to be invariant with tau_p,l and scales with tau_p,h roughly as ~ tau_p,h^(1/2). The weighting factor favors collisions with larger relative velocity, and including it leads to more destructive and less sticking collisions. We compare two collision kernel formulations based on spherical and cylindrical geometries. The two formulations give consistent results for the collision rate and the collision-rate weighted statistics, except that the spherical formulation predicts more head-on collisions than the cylindrical formulation.
  • We investigate the role of mass infall in the formation and evolution of protostars. To avoid ad hoc initial and boundary conditions, we consider the infall resulting self-consistently from modeling the formation of stellar clusters in turbulent molecular clouds. We show that infall rates in turbulent clouds are comparable to accretion rates inferred from protostellar luminosities or measured in pre-main-sequence stars. They should not be neglected in modeling the luminosity of protostars and the evolution of disks, even after the embedded protostellar phase. We find large variations of infall rates from protostar to protostar, and large fluctuations during the evolution of individuals protostars. In most cases, the infall rate is initially of order 10$^{-5}$\msun\ yr$^{-1}$, and may either decay rapidly in the formation of low-mass stars, or remain relatively large when more massive stars are formed. The simulation reproduces well the observed characteristic values and scatter of protostellar luminosities and matches the observed protostellar luminosity function. The luminosity problem is therefore solved once realistic protostellar infall histories are accounted for, with no need for extreme accretion episodes. These results are based on a simulation of randomly-driven magneto-hydrodynamic turbulence on a scale of 4pc, including self-gravity, adaptive-mesh refinement to a resolution of 50AU, and accreting sink particles. The simulation yields a low star formation rate, consistent with the observations, and a mass distribution of sink particles consistent with the observed stellar initial mass function during the whole duration of the simulation, forming nearly 1,300 sink particles over 3.2 Myr.
  • Motivated by its important role in the collisional growth of dust particles in protoplanetary disks, we investigate the probability distribution function (PDF) of the relative velocity of inertial particles suspended in turbulent flows. Using the simulation from our previous work, we compute the relative velocity PDF as a function of the friction timescales, tau_p1 and tau_p2, of two particles of arbitrary sizes. The friction time of particles included in the simulation ranges from 0.1 tau_eta to 54T_L, with tau_eta and T_L the Kolmogorov time and the Lagrangian correlation time of the flow, respectively. The relative velocity PDF is generically non-Gaussian, exhibiting fat tails. For a fixed value of tau_p1, the PDF is the fattest for equal-size particles (tau_p2~tau_p1), and becomes thinner at both tau_p2<tau_ p1 and tau_p2>tau_p1. Defining f as the friction time ratio of the smaller particle to the larger one, we find that, at a given f in 1/2<f<1, the PDF fatness first increases with the friction time, tau_ph, of the larger particle, peaks at tau_ph~tau_eta, and then decreases as tau_ph increases further. For 0<f<1/4, the PDF shape becomes continuously thinner with increasing tau_ph. The PDF is nearly Gaussian only if tau_ph is sufficiently large (>>T_L). These features are successfully explained by the Pan & Padoan model. Using our simulation data and some simplifying assumptions, we estimated the fractions of collisions resulting in sticking, bouncing, and fragmentation as a function of the dust size in protoplanerary disks, and argued that accounting for non-Gaussianity of the collision velocity may help further alleviate the bouncing barrier problem.
  • We extend our earlier work on turbulence-induced relative velocity between equal-size particles (Pan and Padoan, Paper I) to particles of arbitrarily different sizes. The Pan and Padoan (PP10) model shows that the relative velocity between different particles has two contributions, named the generalized shear and acceleration terms, respectively. The generalized shear term represents the particles' memory of the spatial flow velocity difference across the particle distance in the past, while the acceleration term is associated with the temporal flow velocity difference on individual particle trajectories. Using the simulation of Paper I, we compute the root-mean-square relative velocity, <w^2>^1/2, as a function of the friction times, tau_p1 and tau_p2, of the two particles, and show that the PP10 prediction is in satisfactory agreement with the data, confirming its physical picture. For a given tau_p1 below the Lagrangian correlation time of the flow, T_L, <w^2>^1/2 as a function of tau_p2 shows a dip at tau_p2~tau_p1, indicating tighter velocity correlation between similar particles. Defining a ratio f=tau_pl/tau_ph, with tau_pl and tau_ph the friction times of the smaller and larger particles, we find that <w^2>^1/2 increases with decreasing f due to the generalized acceleration contribution, which dominates at f<1/4. At a fixed f, our model predicts that <w^2>^1/2 scales as tau_ph^1/2 for tau_p,h in the inertial range of the flow, stays roughly constant for T_L <tau_ph < T_L/f, and finally decreases as tau_ph^-1/2 for tau_ph>>T_L/f. The acceleration term is independent of the particle distance, r, and thus reduces the r-dependence of <w^2>^1/2 in the bidisperse case.
  • We review recent advances in the analytical and numerical modeling of the star formation rate in molecular clouds and discuss the available observational constraints. We focus on molecular clouds as the fundamental star formation sites, rather than on the larger-scale processes that form the clouds and set their properties. Molecular clouds are shaped into a complex filamentary structure by supersonic turbulence, with only a small fraction of the cloud mass channeled into collapsing protostars over a free-fall time of the system. In recent years, the physics of supersonic turbulence has been widely explored with computer simulations, leading to statistical models of this fragmentation process, and to the prediction of the star formation rate as a function of fundamental physical parameters of molecular clouds, such as the virial parameter, the rms Mach number, the compressive fraction of the turbulence driver, and the ratio of gas to magnetic pressure. Infrared space telescopes, as well as ground-based observatories have provided unprecedented probes of the filamentary structure of molecular clouds and the location of forming stars within them.
  • We study the relative velocity of inertial particles suspended in turbulent flows and discuss implications for dust particle collisions in protoplanetary disks. We simulate a weakly compressible turbulent flow, evolving 14 particle species with friction timescale, tau_p, covering the entire range of scales in the flow. The particle Stokes numbers, St, measuring the ratio of tau_p to the Kolmogorov timescale, are in the range from ~0.1 to ~800. Using simulation results, we show that the model by Pan & Padoan (PP10) gives satisfactory predictions for the rms relative velocity between identical particles. The probability distribution function (PDF) of the relative velocity is found to be highly non-Gaussian. The PDF tails are well described by a 4/3 stretched exponential function for particles with tau_p ~ 1-2 T_L, where T_L is the Lagrangian correlation timescale, consistent with a prediction based on PP10. The PDF approaches Gaussian only for very large particles with tau_p >~ 54 T_L. We split particle pairs at given distances into two types with low and high relative speeds, referred to as continuous and caustic types, respectively, and compute their contributions to the collision kernel. Although amplified by the effect of clustering, the continuous contribution vanishes in the limit of infinitesimal particle distance, where the caustic contribution dominates. The caustic kernel per unit cross section rises rapidly as St increases toward ~1, reaches a maximum at tau_p ~ 2 T_L, and decreases as tau_p^{-1/2} for tau_p >> T_L.
  • We show that supersonic MHD turbulence yields a star formation rate (SFR) as low as observed in molecular clouds (MCs), for characteristic values of the free-fall time divided by the dynamical time, $t_{\rm ff}/t_{\rm dyn}$, the alfv\'{e}nic Mach number, ${\cal M}_{\rm a}$, and the sonic Mach number, ${\cal M}_{\rm s}$. Using a very large set of deep adaptive-mesh-refinement simulations, we quantify the dependence of the SFR per free-fall time, $\epsilon_{\rm ff}$, on the above parameters. Our main results are: i) $\epsilon_{\rm ff}$ decreases exponentially with increasing $t_{\rm ff}/t_{\rm dyn}$, but is insensitive to changes in ${\cal M}_{\rm s}$, for constant values of $t_{\rm ff}/t_{\rm dyn}$ and ${\cal M}_{\rm a}$. ii) Decreasing values of ${\cal M}_{\rm a}$ (stronger magnetic fields) reduce $\epsilon_{\rm ff}$, but only to a point, beyond which $\epsilon_{\rm ff}$ increases with a further decrease of ${\cal M}_{\rm a}$. iii) For values of ${\cal M}_{\rm a}$ characteristic of star-forming regions, $\epsilon_{\rm ff}$ varies with ${\cal M}_{\rm a}$ by less than a factor of two. We propose a simple star-formation law, based on the empirical fit to the minimum $\epsilon_{\rm ff}$, and depending only on $t_{\rm ff}/t_{\rm dyn}$: $\epsilon_{\rm ff} \approx \epsilon_{\rm wind} \exp(-1.6 \,t_{\rm ff}/t_{\rm dyn})$. Because it only depends on the mean gas density and rms velocity, this law is straightforward to implement in simulations and analytical models of galaxy formation and evolution.
  • We examine the effects of self-gravity and magnetic fields on supersonic turbulence in isothermal molecular clouds with high resolution simulations and adaptive mesh refinement. These simulations use large root grids (512^3) to capture turbulence and four levels of refinement to capture high density, for an effective resolution of 8,196^3. Three Mach 9 simulations are performed, two super-Alfv\'enic and one trans-Alfv\'enic. We find that gravity splits the clouds into two populations, one low density turbulent state and one high density collapsing state. The low density state exhibits properties similar to non-self-gravitating in this regime, and we examine the effects of varied magnetic field strength on statistical properties: the density probability distribution function is approximately lognormal; velocity power spectral slopes decrease with field strength; alignment between velocity and magnetic field increases with field; the magnetic field probability distribution can be fit to a stretched exponential. The high density state is characterized by self-similar spheres; the density PDF is a power-law; collapse rate decreases with increasing mean field; density power spectra have positive slopes, P({\rho},k) \propto k; thermal-to-magnetic pressure ratios are unity for all simulations; dynamic-to-magnetic pressure ratios are larger than unity for all simulations; magnetic field distribution is a power-law. The high Alfv\'en Mach numbers in collapsing regions explain recent observations of magnetic influence decreasing with density. We also find that the high density state is found in filaments formed by converging flows, consistent with recent Herschel observations. Possible modifications to existing star formation theories are explored.
  • The observed similarities between the mass function of prestellar cores (CMF) and the stellar initial mass function (IMF) have led to the suggestion that the IMF is already largely determined in the gas phase. However, theoretical arguments show that the CMF may differ significantly from the IMF. In this Letter, we study the relation between the CMF and the IMF, as predicted by the IMF model of Padoan and Nordlund. We show that 1) the observed mass of prestellar cores is on average a few times smaller than that of the stellar systems they generate; 2) the CMF rises monotonically with decreasing mass, with a noticeable change in slope at approximately 3-5 solar masses, depending on mean density; 3) the selection of cores with masses larger than half their Bonnor-Ebert mass yields a CMF approximately consistent with the system IMF, rescaled in mass by the same factor as our model IMF, and therefore suitable to estimate the local efficiency of star formation, and to study the dependence of the IMF peak on cloud properties; 4) only one in five pre-brown-dwarf core candidates is a true progenitor to a brown dwarf.
  • We study clustering of inertial particles in turbulent flows and discuss its applications to dust particles in protoplanetary disks. Using numerical simulations, we compute the radial distribution function (RDF), which measures the probability of finding particle pairs at given distances, and the probability density function of the particle concentration. The clustering statistics depend on the Stokes number, $St$, defined as the ratio of the particle friction timescale, $\tau_{\rm p} $, to the Kolmogorov timescale in the flow. In the dissipation range, the clustering intensity strongly peaks at $St \simeq 1$, and the RDF for $St \sim 1$ shows a fast power-law increase toward small scales, suggesting that turbulent clustering may considerably enhance the particle collision rate. Clustering at inertial-range scales is of particular interest to the problem of planetesimal formation. At these scales, the strongest clustering is from particles with $\tau_{\rm p}$ in the inertial range. Clustering of these particles occurs primarily around a scale where the eddy turnover time is $\sim\tau_{\rm p}$. Particles of different sizes tend to cluster at different locations, leading to flat RDFs between different particles at small scales. In the presence of multiple particle sizes, the overall clustering strength decreases as the particle size distribution broadens. We discuss particle clustering in recent models for planetesimal formation. We point out that, in the model based on turbulent clustering of chondrule-size particles, the probability of finding strong clusters that can seed planetesimals may have been significantly overestimated. We discuss various clustering mechanisms in simulations of planetesimal formation by gravitational collapse of dense clumps of meter-size particles, in particular the contribution from turbulent clustering due to the limited numerical resolution.
  • We employ simulations of supersonic super-Alfvenic turbulence decay as a benchmark test problem to assess and compare the performance of nine astrophysical MHD methods actively used to model star formation. The set of nine codes includes: ENZO, FLASH, KT-MHD, LL-MHD, PLUTO, PPML, RAMSES, STAGGER, and ZEUS. We present a comprehensive set of statistical measures designed to quantify the effects of numerical dissipation in these MHD solvers. We compare power spectra for basic fields to determine the effective spectral bandwidth of the methods and rank them based on their relative effective Reynolds numbers. We also compare numerical dissipation for solenoidal and dilatational velocity components to check for possible impacts of the numerics on small-scale density statistics. Finally, we discuss convergence of various characteristics for the turbulence decay test and impacts of various components of numerical schemes on the accuracy of solutions. We show that the best performing codes employ a consistently high order of accuracy for spatial reconstruction of the evolved fields, transverse gradient interpolation, conservation law update step, and Lorentz force computation. The best results are achieved with divergence-free evolution of the magnetic field using the constrained transport method, and using little to no explicit artificial viscosity. Codes which fall short in one or more of these areas are still useful, but they must compensate higher numerical dissipation with higher numerical resolution. This paper is the largest, most comprehensive MHD code comparison on an application-like test problem to date. We hope this work will help developers improve their numerical algorithms while helping users to make informed choices in picking optimal applications for their specific astrophysical problems.
  • We report results from a cosmological simulation with non-equilibrium chemistry of 21 species, including H2, HD, and LiH molecular cooling. Starting from cosmological initial conditions, we focus on the evolution of the central 1.8 Kpc region of a 3 x 10^7 Msun halo. The crossing of a few 10^6 Msun halos and the gas accretion through larger scale filaments generate a turbulent environment within this region. Due to the short cooling time caused by the non-equilibrium formation of H2, the supersonic turbulence results in a very fragmented mass distribution, where dense, gravitationally unstable clumps emerge from a complex network of dense filaments. At z=10.87, we find approximately 25 well defined, gravitationally unstable clumps, with masses of 4 x 10^3-9 x 10^5 Msun, temperatures of approximately 300K, and cooling times much shorter than the free-fall time. Only the initial phase of the collapse of individual clumps is spatially resolved in the simulation. Depending on the density reached in the collapse, the estimated average Bonnor-Ebert masses are in the range 200-800 Msun. We speculate that each clump may further fragment into a cluster of stars with a characteristic mass in the neighborhood of 50 Msun. This process at z ~ 11 may represent the dominant mode of Pop. III star formation, causing a rapid chemical enrichment of the protogalactic environment.
  • This work presents a new physical model of the star formation rate (SFR), verified with an unprecedented set of large numerical simulations of driven, supersonic, self-gravitating, magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, where collapsing cores are captured with accreting sink particles. The model depends on the relative importance of gravitational, turbulent, magnetic, and thermal energies, expressed through the virial parameter, alpha_vir, the rms sonic Mach number, M_S,0, and the ratio of mean gas pressure to mean magnetic pressure, beta_0. The SFR is predicted to decrease with increasing alpha_vir (stronger turbulence relative to gravity), to increase with increasing M_S,0 (for constant values of alpha_vir), and to depend weakly on beta_0 for values typical of star forming regions (M_S,0 ~ 4-20 and beta_0 ~ 1-20). In the unrealistic limit of beta_0 -> infinity, that is in the complete absence of a magnetic field, the SFR increases approximately by a factor of three, which shows the importance of magnetic fields in the star formation process, even when they are relatively weak (super-Alfvenic turbulence). In this non-magnetized limit, our definition of the critical density for star formation has the same dependence on alpha_vir, and almost the same dependence on M_S,0, as in the model of Krumholz and McKee, although our physical derivation does not rely on the concepts of local turbulent pressure and sonic scale. However, our model predicts a different dependence of the SFR on alpha_vir and M_S,0 than the model of Krumholz and McKee. The star-formation simulations used to test the model result in an approximately constant SFR, after an initial transient phase. Both the value of the SFR and its dependence on the virial parameter found in the simulations are shown to agree very well with the theoretical predictions.
  • In this work, we present the mass and magnetic distributions found in a recent Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) MHD simulation of supersonic, \sa, self gravitating turbulence. Powerlaw tails are found in both volume density and magnetic field probability density functions, with $P(\rho) \propto \rho^{-1.67}$ and $P(B)\propto B^{-2.74}$. A power law is also found between magnetic field strength and density, with $B\propto \rho^{0.48}$, throughout the collapsing gas. The mass distribution of gravitationally bound cores is shown to be in excellent agreement with recent observation of prestellar cores. The mass to flux distribution of cores is also found to be in excellent agreement with recent Zeeman splitting measurements.
  • We present a model for the relative velocity of inertial particles in turbulent flows. Our general formulation shows that the relative velocity has contributions from two terms, referred to as the generalized acceleration and generalized shear terms, because they reduce to the well known acceleration and shear terms in the Saffman-Turner limit. The generalized shear term represents particles' memory of the flow velocity difference along their trajectories and depends on the inertial particle pair dispersion backward in time. The importance of this backward dispersion in determining the particle relative velocity is emphasized. We find that our model with a two-phase separation behavior, an early ballistic phase and a later tracer-like phase, as found by recent simulations for the forward (in time) dispersion of inertial particle pairs, gives good fits to the measured relative speeds from simulations at low Reynolds numbers. In the monodisperse case with identical particles, the generalized acceleration term vanishes and the relative velocity is determined by the generalized shear term. At large Reynolds numbers, our model gives a $St^{1/2}$ dependence of the relative velocity on the Stokes number $St$ in the inertial range for both the ballistic behavior and the Richardson separation law. This leads to the same inertial-range scaling for the two-phase separation that well fits the simulation results. Our calculations for the bidisperse case show that, with the friction timescale of one particle fixed, the relative speed as a function of the other particle's friction time has a dip when the two timescales are similar. We find that the primary contribution at the dip is from the generalized shear term, while the generalized acceleration term is dominant for particles of very different sizes.
  • We use three-dimensional numerical simulations to study self-organization in supersonic turbulence in molecular clouds. Our numerical experiments describe decaying and driven turbulent flows with an isothermal equation of state, sonic Mach numbers from 2 to 10, and various degrees of magnetization. We focus on properties of the velocity field and, specifically, on the level of its potential (dilatational) component as a function of turbulent Mach number, magnetic field strength, and scale. We show how extreme choices of either purely solenoidal or purely potential forcing can reduce the extent of the inertial range in the context of periodic box models for molecular cloud turbulence. We suggest an optimized forcing to maximize the effective Reynolds number in numerical models.
  • Is the turbulence in cluster-forming regions internally driven by stellar outflows or the consequence of a large-scale turbulent cascade? We address this question by studying the turbulent energy spectrum in NGC 1333. Using synthetic 13CO maps computed with a snapshot of a supersonic turbulence simulation, we show that the VCS method of Lazarian and Pogosyan provides an accurate estimate of the turbulent energy spectrum. We then apply this method to the 13CO map of NGC 1333 from the COMPLETE database. We find the turbulent energy spectrum is a power law, E(k) k^-beta, in the range of scales 0.06 pc < ell < 1.5 pc, with slope beta=1.85\pm 0.04. The estimated energy injection scale of stellar outflows in NGC 1333 is ell_inj 0.3 pc, well resolved by the observations. There is no evidence of the flattening of the energy spectrum above the scale ell_inj predicted by outflow-driven simulations and analytical models. The power spectrum of integrated intensity is also a nearly perfect power law in the range of scales 0.16 pc < ell < 7.9 pc, with no feature above ell_inj. We conclude that the observed turbulence in NGC 1333 does not appear to be driven primarily by stellar outflows.
  • We present results of large-scale three-dimensional simulations of weakly magnetized supersonic turbulence at grid resolutions up to 1024^3 cells. Our numerical experiments are carried out with the Piecewise Parabolic Method on a Local Stencil and assume an isothermal equation of state. The turbulence is driven by a large-scale isotropic solenoidal force in a periodic computational domain and fully develops in a few flow crossing times. We then evolve the flow for a number of flow crossing times and analyze various statistical properties of the saturated turbulent state. We show that the energy transfer rate in the inertial range of scales is surprisingly close to a constant, indicating that Kolmogorov's phenomenology for incompressible turbulence can be extended to magnetized supersonic flows. We also discuss numerical dissipation effects and convergence of different turbulence diagnostics as grid resolution refines from 256^3 to 1024^3 cells.
  • Recent measurements of the Zeeman effect in dark-cloud cores provide important tests for theories of cloud dynamics and prestellar core formation. In this Letter we report results of simulated Zeeman measurements, based on radiative transfer calculations through a snapshot of a simulation of supersonic and super-Alfv\'enic turbulence. We have previously shown that the same simulation yields a relative mass-to-flux ratio (core versus envelope) in agreement with the observations (and in contradiction with the ambipolar-drift model of core formation). Here we show that the mass-to-flux and turbulent-to-magnetic-energy ratios in the simulated cores agree with observed values as well. The mean magnetic field strength in the simulation is very low, \bar{B}=0.34 \muG, presumably lower than the mean field in molecular clouds. Nonetheless, high magnetic field values are found in dense cores, in agreement with the observations (the rms field, amplified by the turbulence, is B_{rms}=3.05 \muG). We conclude that a strong large-scale mean magnetic field is not required by Zeeman effect measurements to date, although it is not ruled out by this work.