• The increasing availability and adoption of shared vehicles as an alternative to personally-owned cars presents ample opportunities for achieving more efficient transportation in cities. With private cars spending on the average over 95\% of the time parked, one of the possible benefits of shared mobility is the reduced need for parking space. While widely discussed, a systematic quantification of these benefits as a function of mobility demand and sharing models is still mostly lacking in the literature. As a first step in this direction, this paper focuses on a type of private mobility which, although specific, is a major contributor to traffic congestion and parking needs, namely, home-work commuting. We develop a data-driven methodology for estimating commuter parking needs in different shared mobility models, including a model where self-driving vehicles are used to partially compensate flow imbalance typical of commuting, and further reduce parking infrastructure at the expense of increased traveled kilometers. We consider the city of Singapore as a case study, and produce very encouraging results showing that the gradual transition to shared mobility models will bring tangible reductions in parking infrastructure. In the future-looking, self-driving vehicle scenario, our analysis suggests that up to 50\% reduction in parking needs can be achieved at the expense of increasing total traveled kilometers of less than 2\%.
  • Cars can nowadays record several thousands of signals through the CAN bus technology and potentially provide real-time information on the car, the driver and the surrounding environment. This paper proposes a new method for the analysis and classification of driver behavior using a selected subset of CAN bus signals, specifically gas pedal position, brake pedal pressure, steering wheel angle, steering wheel momentum, velocity, RPM, frontal and lateral acceleration. Data has been collected in a completely uncontrolled experiment, where 64 people drove 10 cars for or a total of over 2000 driving trips without any type of pre-determined driving instruction on a wide variety of road scenarios. We propose an unsupervised learning technique that clusters drivers in different groups, and offers a validation method to test the robustness of clustering in a wide range of experimental settings. The minimal amount of data needed to preserve robust driver clustering is also computed. The presented study provides a new methodology for near-real-time classification of driver behavior in uncontrolled environments.
  • Sharing rides could drastically improve the efficiency of car and taxi transportation. Unleashing such potential, however, requires understanding how urban parameters affect the fraction of individual trips that can be shared, a quantity that we call shareability. Using data on millions of taxi trips in New York City, San Francisco, Singapore, and Vienna, we compute the shareability curves for each city, and find that a natural rescaling collapses them onto a single, universal curve. We explain this scaling law theoretically with a simple model that predicts the potential for ride sharing in any city, using a few basic urban quantities and no adjustable parameters. Accurate extrapolations of this type will help planners, transportation companies, and society at large to shape a sustainable path for urban growth.
  • Cities are changing constantly. All urban systems face different conditions from day to day. Even when averaged regularities can be found, urban systems will be more efficient if they can adapt to changes at the same speeds at which these occur. Technology can assist humans in achieving this adaptation. Inspired by cybernetics, we propose a description of cities as adaptive systems. We identify three main components: information, algorithms, and agents, which we illustrate with current and future examples. The implications of adaptive cities are manifold, with direct impacts on mobility, sustainability, resilience, governance, and society. Still, the potential of adaptive cities will not depend so much on technology as on how we use it.
  • With recent advances in battery technology and the resulting decrease in the charging times, public charging stations are becoming a viable option for Electric Vehicle (EV) drivers. Concurrently, wide-spread use of location-tracking devices in mobile phones and wearable devices makes it possible to track individual-level human movements to an unprecedented spatial and temporal grain. Motivated by these developments, we propose a novel methodology to perform data-driven optimization of EV charging stations location. We formulate the problem as a discrete optimization problem on a geographical grid, with the objective of covering the entire demand region while minimizing a measure of drivers' discomfort. Since optimally solving the problem is computationally infeasible, we present computationally efficient, near-optimal solutions based on greedy and genetic algorithms. We then apply the proposed methodology to optimize EV charging stations location in the city of Boston, starting from a massive cellular phone data sets covering 1 million users over 4 months. Results show that genetic algorithm based optimization provides the best solutions in terms of drivers' discomfort and the number of charging stations required, which are both reduced about 10 percent as compared to a randomized solution. We further investigate robustness of the proposed data-driven methodology, showing that, building upon well-known regularity of aggregate human mobility patterns, the near-optimal solution computed using single day movements preserves its properties also in later months. When collectively considered, the results presented in this paper clearly indicate the potential of data-driven approaches for optimally locating public charging facilities at the urban scale.
  • Understanding human mobility is of vital importance for urban planning, epidemiology, and many other fields that aim to draw policies from the activities of humans in space. Despite recent availability of large scale data sets related to human mobility such as GPS traces, mobile phone data, etc., it is still true that such data sets represent a subsample of the population of interest, and then might give an incomplete picture of the entire population in question. Notwithstanding the abundant usage of such inherently limited data sets, the impact of sampling biases on mobility patterns is unclear -- we do not have methods available to reliably infer mobility information from a limited data set. Here, we investigate the effects of sampling using a data set of millions of taxi movements in New York City. On the one hand, we show that mobility patterns are highly stable once an appropriate simple rescaling is applied to the data, implying negligible loss of information due to subsampling over long time scales. On the other hand, contrasting an appropriate null model on the weighted network of vehicle flows reveals distinctive features which need to be accounted for. Accordingly, we formulate a "supersampling" methodology which allows us to reliably extrapolate mobility data from a reduced sample and propose a number of network-based metrics to reliably assess its quality (and that of other human mobility models). Our approach provides a well founded way to exploit temporal patterns to save effort in recording mobility data, and opens the possibility to scale up data from limited records when information on the full system is needed.
  • Taxi services are a vital part of urban transportation, and a considerable contributor to traffic congestion and air pollution causing substantial adverse effects on human health. Sharing taxi trips is a possible way of reducing the negative impact of taxi services on cities, but this comes at the expense of passenger discomfort quantifiable in terms of a longer travel time. Due to computational challenges, taxi sharing has traditionally been approached on small scales, such as within airport perimeters, or with dynamical ad-hoc heuristics. However, a mathematical framework for the systematic understanding of the tradeoff between collective benefits of sharing and individual passenger discomfort is lacking. Here we introduce the notion of shareability network which allows us to model the collective benefits of sharing as a function of passenger inconvenience, and to efficiently compute optimal sharing strategies on massive datasets. We apply this framework to a dataset of millions of taxi trips taken in New York City, showing that with increasing but still relatively low passenger discomfort, cumulative trip length can be cut by 40% or more. This benefit comes with reductions in service cost, emissions, and with split fares, hinting towards a wide passenger acceptance of such a shared service. Simulation of a realistic online system demonstrates the feasibility of a shareable taxi service in New York City. Shareability as a function of trip density saturates fast, suggesting effectiveness of the taxi sharing system also in cities with much sparser taxi fleets or when willingness to share is low.
  • Performance bounds for opportunistic networks have been derived in a number of recent papers for several key quantities, such as the expected delivery time of a unicast message, or the flooding time (a measure of how fast information spreads). However, to the best of our knowledge, none of the existing results is derived under a mobility model which is able to reproduce the power law+exponential tail dichotomy of the pairwise node inter-contact time distribution which has been observed in traces of several real opportunistic networks. The contributions of this paper are two-fold: first, we present a simple pairwise contact model -- called the Home-MEG model -- for opportunistic networks based on the observation made in previous work that pairs of nodes in the network tend to meet in very few, selected locations (home locations); this contact model is shown to be able to faithfully reproduce the power law+exponential tail dichotomy of inter-contact time. Second, we use the Home-MEG model to analyze flooding time in opportunistic networks, presenting asymptotic bounds on flooding time that assume different initial conditions for the existence of opportunistic links. Finally, our bounds provide some analytical evidences that the speed of information spreading in opportunistic networks can be much faster than that predicted by simple geometric mobility models.
  • Several social-aware forwarding strategies have been recently introduced in opportunistic networks, and proved effective in considerably in- creasing routing performance through extensive simulation studies based on real-world data. However, this performance improvement comes at the expense of storing a considerable amount of state information (e.g, history of past encounters) at the nodes. Hence, whether the benefits on routing performance comes directly from the social-aware forwarding mechanism, or indirectly by the fact state information is exploited is not clear. Thus, the question of whether social-aware forwarding by itself is effective in improving opportunistic network routing performance remained unaddressed so far. In this paper, we give a first, positive answer to the above question, by investigating the expected message delivery time as the size of the net- work grows larger.