• Building on previous work, we have expanded our catalog of evolutionary models for stars with variable composition; here we present models for stars of mass 0.5 - 1.2 Msol, at scaled metallicities of 0.1 - 1.5 Zsol, and specific C/Fe, Mg/Fe, and Ne/Fe values of 0.58 - 1.72 C/Fe_sol, 0.54 - 1.84 Mg/Fe_sol and 0.5 - 2.0 Ne/Fe_sol, respectively. We include a spread in abundance values for carbon and magnesium based on observations of their variability in nearby stars; we choose an arbitrary spread in neon abundance values commensurate with the range seen in other low Z elements due to the difficult nature of obtaining precise measurements of neon abundances in stars. As indicated by the results of Truitt et al. (2015), it is essential that we understand how differences in individual elemental abundances, and not just the total scaled metallicity, can measurably impact a star's evolutionary lifetime and other physical characteristics. In that work we found that oxygen abundances significantly impacted the stellar evolution; carbon, magnesium, and neon are potentially important elements to individually consider due to their relatively high (but also variable) abundances in stars. We present 528 new stellar main sequence models, and we calculate the time-dependent evolution of the associated habitable zone boundaries for each based on mass, temperature, and luminosity. We also reintroduce the 2 Gyr "Continuously Habitable Zone" as a useful tool to help gauge the habitability potential for a given planetary system.
  • We present stellar evolution models for 0.5 - 1.2 \Msol at scaled metallicities of 0.1 - 1.5 Z\sol and O/Fe values of 0.44 - 2.28 O/Fe\sol. The time dependent evolution of habitable zone boundaries are calculated for each stellar evolution track based on stellar mass, effective temperature, and luminosity parameterizations. The rate of change of stellar surface quantities and the surrounding habitable zone position are strong functions of all three quantities explored. The range of orbits that remain continuously habitable, or habitable for at least 2 Gyr, are provided. The results show that the detailed chemical characterization of exoplanet host stars and a consideration of their evolutionary history are necessary to assess the likelihood that a planet found in the instantaneous habitable zone has had sufficient time to develop a biosphere capable of producing detectable biosignatures. This model grid is designed for use by the astrobiology and exoplanet communities to efficiently characterize the time evolution of host stars and their habitable zones for planetary candidates of interest.
  • The SuperNovae Analysis aPplication (SNAP) is a new tool for the analysis of SN observations and validation of SN models. SNAP consists of an open source relational database with (a) observational light curve, (b) theoretical light curve, and (c) correlation table sets, statistical comparison software, and a web interface available to the community. The theoretical models are intended to span a gridded range of parameter space. The goal is to have users to upload new SN models or new SN observations and run the comparison software to determine correlations via the web site. There are looming problems on the horizon that SNAP begins to solve. Namely, large surveys will discover thousands of SNe annually. Frequently, the parameter space of a new SN event is unbounded. SNAP will be a resource to constrain parameters and determine if an event needs follow-up without spending resources to create new light curve models from scratch. Secondly, there is not a rapidly available, systematic way to determine degeneracies between parameters or even what physics is needed to model a realistic SNe. The correlations made within the SNAP system begin to solve these problems.
  • Stellar elemental abundances are important for understanding the fundamental properties of a star or stellar group, such as age and evolutionary history, as well as the composition of an orbiting planet. However, as abundance measurement techniques have progressed, there has been little standardization between individual methods and their comparisons. As a result, different stellar abundance procedures determine measurements that vary beyond quoted error for the same elements within the same stars (Hinkel et al. 2014). The purpose of this paper is to better understand the systematic variations between methods and offer recommendations for producing more accurate results in the future. We have invited a number of participants from around the world (Australia, Portugal, Sweden, Switzerland, and USA) to calculate ten element abundances (C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Fe, Ni, Ba, and Eu) using the same stellar spectra for four stars (HD361, HD10700, HD121504, HD202206). Each group produced measurements for each of the stars using: 1) their own autonomous techniques, 2) standardized stellar parameters, 3) standardized line list, and 4) both standardized parameters and line list. We present the resulting stellar parameters, absolute abundances, and a metric of data similarity that quantifies homogeneity of the data. We conclude that standardization of some kind, particularly stellar parameters, improves the consistency between methods. However, because results did not converge as more free parameters were standardized, it is clear there are inherent issues within the techniques that need to be reconciled. Therefore, we encourage more conversation and transparency within the community such that stellar abundance determinations can be reproducible as well as accurate and precise.
  • Mass loss remains one of the primary uncertainties in stellar evolution. In the most massive stars, mass loss dictates the circumstellar medium and can significantly alter the fate of the star. Mass loss is caused by a variety of wind mechanisms and also through binary interactions. Supernovae are excellent probes of this mass loss, both the circumstellar material and the reduced mass of the hydrogen-rich envelope. In this paper, we focus on the effects of reducing the hydrogen-envelope mass on the supernova light curve, studying both the shock breakout and peak light curve emission for a wide variety of mass loss scenarios. Even though the trends of this mass loss will be masked somewhat by variations caused by different progenitors, explosion energies, and circumstellar media, these trends have significant effects on the supernova light-curves that should be seen in supernova surveys. We conclude with a comparison of our results to a few key observations.
  • {\tau} Ceti (HD10700), a G8 dwarf with solar mass of 0.78, is a close (3.65 pc) sun-like star where 5 possibly terrestrial planet candidates (minimum masses of 2, 3.1, 3.5, 4.3, and 6.7 Earth masses) have recently been discovered. We report abundances of 23 elements using spectra from the MIKE spectrograph on Magellan. Using stellar models with the abundances determined here, we calculate the position of the classical habitable zone with time. At the current best fit age, 7.63 Gy, up to two planets (e and f) may be in the habitable zone, depending on atmospheric properties. The Mg/Si ratio of the star is found to be 1.78, which is much greater than for Earth (about 1.2). With a system that has such an excess of Mg to Si ratio it is possible that the mineralogical make-up of planets around {\tau} Ceti could be significantly different from that of Earth, with possible oversaturation of MgO, resulting in an increase in the content of olivine and ferropericlase compared with Earth. The increase in MgO would have a drastic impact on the rheology of the mantles of the planets around {\tau} Ceti.
  • We compile spectroscopic abundance data from 84 literature sources for 50 elements across 3058 stars in the solar neighborhood, within 150 pc of the Sun, to produce the Hypatia Catalog. We evaluate the variability of the spread in abundance measurements reported for the same star by different surveys. We also explore the likely association of the star within the Galactic disk, the corresponding observation and abundance determination methods for all catalogs in Hypatia, the influence of specific catalogs on the overall abundance trends, and the effect of normalizing all abundances to the same solar scale. The resulting large number of stellar abundance determinations in the Hypatia Catalog are analyzed only for thin-disk stars with observations that are consistent between literature sources. As a result of our large dataset, we find that the stars in the solar neighborhood may be reveal an asymmetric abundance distribution, such that a [Fe/H]-rich group near to the mid-plane is deficient in Mg, Si, S, Ca, Sc II, Cr II, and Ni as compared to stars further from the plane. The Hypatia Catalog has a wide number of applications, including exoplanet hosts, thick and thin disk stars, or stars with different kinematic properties.
  • The discovery of supernovae associated with long-duration gamma ray burst observations is primary evidence that the progenitors of these outbursts are massive stars. One of the principle mysteries in understanding these progenitors has been the fact that all of these gamma-ray burst associated supernovae are type Ic supernovae, with no evidence of helium in the stellar atmosphere. Many studies have focused on whether or not this helium is simply hidden from spectral analyses. In this paper, we show results from recent stellar models using new convection algorithms based on our current understanding of stellar mixing. We demonstrate that enhanced convection may lead to severe depletion of stellar helium layers, suggesting that the helium is not observed simply because it is not in the star. We also present light-curves and spectra of these compact helium-depleted stars, compared to models with more conventional helium layers.
  • We present the first 3-dimensional simulations following the evolution of supernova shocks from their inception in the stellar core through the development of a supernova remnant into the Sedov phase. Our set of simulations use two different progenitors and two different conditions for the structure of the circumstellar environment. These calculations demonstrate the role that supernova instabilities (the instabilities that develop as the shock drive through the star) play in defining the structure and long-term development of instabilities in supernova remnants. We also present a first investigation of the mixing between stellar and interstellar matter as the supernova evolves into a young supernova remnant.
  • The Procyon AB binary system (orbital period 40.838 years, a newly-refined determination), is near and bright enough that the component radii, effective temperatures, and luminosities are very well determined, although more than one possible solution to the masses has limited the claimed accuracy. Preliminary mass determinations for each component are available from HST imaging, supported by ground-based astrometry and an excellent Hipparcos parallax; we use these for our preferred solution for the binary system. Other values for the masses are also considered. We have employed the TYCHO stellar evolution code to match the radius and luminosity of the F5 IV-V primary star to determine the system's most likely age as 1.87 +/- 0.13 Gyr. Since prior studies of Procyon A found its abundance indistinguishable from solar, the solar composition of Asplund, Grevesse & Sauval (Z=0.014) is assumed for the HR Diagram flitting. An unsuccessful attempt to fit using the older solar abundance scale of Grevesse & Sauval (Z=0.019) is also reported. For Procyon B, eleven new sequences for the cooling of non-DA white dwarfs have been calculated, to investigate the dependence of the cooling age on (1) the mass, (2) the core composition, (3) the helium layer mass, and (4) heavy-element opacities in the helium envelope. Our calculations indicate a cooling age of 1.19+/-0.11 Gyr, which implies that the progenitor mass of Procyon B was 2.59(+0.44,-0.26) Msun. In a plot of initial vs final mass of white dwarfs in astrometric binaries or star clusters (all with age determinations), the Procyon B final mass lies several sigma below a straight line fit.
  • The AB Dor Moving Group consists of a "nucleus" of ~10 stars at d ~ 20 pc, along with dozens of purported "stream" members distributed across the sky. We perform a chemical and kinematic analysis of a subsample of AB Dor stream stars to test whether they constitute a physical stellar group. We use the NEMO Galactic kinematic code to investigate the orbits of the stream members, and perform a chemical abundance analysis using high resolution spectra taken with the Magellan Clay 6.5-m telescope. Using a chi^2 test with the measured abundances for 10 different elements, we find that only half of the purported AB Dor stream members could possibly constitute a statistically chemically homogeneous sample. Some stream members with 3D velocities were hundreds of parsecs from the AB Dor nucleus ~10^8 yr ago, and hence were unlikely to share a common origin. We conclude that the published lists of AB Dor moving group stream members are unlikely to represent the dispersed remnant of a single star formation episode. A subsample of the stream stars appears to be both statistically chemically homogeneous and in the vicinity of the AB Dor nucleus at birth. Their mean metallicity is [Fe/H] = 0.02 +/- 0.02 dex, which we consider representative for the AB Dor group. Finally, we report a strong lower limit on the age of the AB Dor nucleus of >110 Myr based on the pre-MS contraction times for K-type members which have reached the main sequence.
  • The high quality spectra required for radial velocity planet searches are well-suited to providing abundances for a wide array of elements in large samples of stars. Abundance ratios of the most common elements relative to Fe are observed to vary by more than a factor of two in planet host candidates. This level of variation has a substantial impact on the evolution of the host star and the extent of its habitable zone. We present stellar models of 1 solar mass stars with custom compositions representing the full range of these non-solar abundance ratios. We find that the effects derived from variation over the observed range of [O/Fe] are particularly dramatic. Habitability lifetimes for some classes of orbits can vary by gigayears for the observed range in [O/Fe].
  • It is suggested in observations of supernova remnants that a number of large- and small-scale structures form at various points in the explosion. Multidimensional modeling of core-collapse supernovae has been undertaken since SN1987A, and both simulations and observations suggest/show that Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities during the explosion is a main driver for the formation of structure in the remnants. We present a case study of structure formation in 3D in a \msol{15} supernova for different parameters. We investigate the effect of moderate asymmetries and different resolutions of the formation and morphology of the RT unstable region, and take first steps at determining typical physical quantities (size, composition) of arising clumps. We find that in this progenitor the major RT unstable region develops at the He/OC interface for all cases considered. The RT instabilities result in clumps that are overdense by 1-2 orders of magnitude with respect to the ambient gas, have size scales on the level of a few % of the remnant diameter, and are not diffused after the first $\sim30$ yrs of the remnant evolution, in the absence of a surrounding medium.
  • We compare the yields of Ti44 and Ni56 produced from post-processing the thermodynamic trajectories from three different core-collapse models -- a Cassiopeia A progenitor, a double shock hypernova progenitor, and a rotating 2D explosion -- with the yields from exponential and power-law trajectories. The peak temperatures and densities achieved in these core-collapse models span several of the distinct nucleosynthesis regions we identify, resulting in different trends in the Ti44 and Ni56 yields for different mass elements. The Ti44 and Ni56 mass fraction profiles from the exponential and power-law profiles generally explain the tendencies of the post-processed yields, depending on which regions are traversed by the model. We find integrated yields of Ti44 and Ni56 from the exponential and power-law trajectories are generally within a factor 2 or less of the post-process yields. We also analyze the influence of specific nuclear reactions on the Ti44 and Ni56 abundance evolution. Reactions that affect all yields globally are the 3a, p(e-,nu)n and n(e+,nubar)p. The rest of the reactions are ranked according to their degree of impact on the synthesis of Ti44. The primary ones include Ti44(a,p)V47, Ca40(a,g)Ti44, V45(p,g)Cr46, Ca40(a,p)Sc43, F17(a,p)Ne20, Na21(a,p)Mg24, Sc41(p,g)Ti42, Sc43(p,g)Ti44, Ti44(p,g)V45, and Ni57(p,g)Cu58, along with numerous weak reactions. Our analysis suggests that not all Ti44 need be produced in an a-rich freeze-out in core-collapse events, and that reaction rate equilibria in combination with timescale effects for the expansion profile may account for the paucity of Ti44 observed in supernovae remnants.
  • As a step toward a complete theoretical integration of 3D compressible hydrodynamic simulations into stellar evolution, convection at the surface and sub-surface layers of the Sun is re-examined, from a restricted point of view, in the language of mixing-length theory (MLT) . Requiring that MLT use a hydrodynamically realistic dissipation length gives a new constraint on solar models. While the stellar structure which results is similar to that obtained by YREC and Garching models, the theoretical picture differs. A new quantitative connection is made between macro-turbulence, micro-turbulence, and the convective velocity scale at the photosphere, which has finite values. The "geometric parameter" in MLT is found to correspond more reasonably with the size of the strong downward plumes which drive convection (Stein and Nordlund 1998), and thus has a physical interpretation even in MLT. Use of 3D simulations of both adiabatic convection and stellar atmospheres will allow the determination of the dissipation length and the geometric parameter (i.e., the entropy jump), with no astronomical calibration. A physically realistic treatment of convection in stellar evolution will require additional modifications beyond MLT, including effects of kinetic energy flux, entrainment (the most dramatic difference from MLT found by Meakin and Arnett 2007), rotation, and magnetic fields (Balbus 2009}.
  • Astronomers have proposed a number of mechanisms to produce supernova explosions. Although many of these mechanisms are now not considered primary engines behind supernovae, they do produce transients that will be observed by upcoming ground-based surveys and NASA satellites. Here we present the first radiation-hydrodynamics calculations of the spectra and light curves from three of these "failed" supernovae: supernovae with considerable fallback, accretion induced collapse of white dwarfs, and energetic helium flashes (also known as type .Ia supernovae).
  • We report extensive radial-velocity measurements of the two giant components of the detached, 104-day period binary system of Capella. Our highly accurate three-dimensional orbital solution based on all existing spectroscopic and astrometric observations including our own yields much improved masses of 2.466 +/- 0.018 M_Sun and 2.443 +/- 0.013 M_Sun for the primary and secondary (relative errors of 0.7% and 0.5%). Improved values are derived also for the radii (11.87 +/- 0.56 R_Sun and 8.75 +/- 0.32 R_Sun), effective temperatures (4920 +/- 70 K and 5680 +/- 70 K), and luminosities (79.5 +/- 4.8 L_Sun and 72.1 +/- 3.6 L_Sun). The distance is determined to be 13.042 +/- 0.028 pc. Capella is unique among evolved stars in that, in addition to all of the above, the chemical composition is known, including the overall metallicity [m/H], the carbon isotope ratio 12C/13C for the primary, and the lithium abundance and C/N ratios for both components. The latter three quantities are sensitive diagnostics of evolution, and change drastically for giants as a result of the deepening of the convective envelope during the first dredge-up. The secondary is crossing the Hertzprung gap, while the primary is believed to be in the longer-lived core-helium burning phase. However, we find that current stellar evolution models are unable to match all of the observations for both components at the same time, and at a single age, for any evolutionary state of the primary. Similar problems are found when testing the rotational synchronization, spin axis alignment, and orbital circularization of the system against tidal theory. We conclude that our understanding of the advanced stages of stellar evolution is still very incomplete. [Abridged]
  • Abridged: The golden age of astrophysics is upon us with both grand discoveries (extra-solar planets, dark matter, dark energy) and precision cosmology. Fundamental understanding of the working of stars and galaxies is within reach, thanks to newly available precision measurements. We highlight the importance of distances and model independent distances and masses. Distances are fundamental in astrophysics and their knowledge can change our perception of phenomena dramatically: e.g., in antiquity, the Heliocentric model was rejected because the predicted stellar parallaxes were not observed. Distance measurements are directly related to the history & fate of the uni- verse as they provide 2 of 3 methods available to date the universe. The 1st method is based on the ages of stars, which can be ascertained if their lumi- nosities (distances) are accurately known. The 2nd method relies on cosmolo- gical methods. To 1st order, the age of the universe is the inverse H_0. As stressed by the previous decadal report, "the fundamental goal of ... astrophysics is to understand how the universe ... galaxies [and] stars ... formed, how they evolved, and what their destiny will be." These questions can be answered partly by micro-arcsecond astrometry: 1) Galactic archeology: a detailed reconstruction of the formation history of the Milky Way and other Local Group galaxies, 2) the very oldest stars in the Milky Way and the age of the Universe, and 3) H_0 and concordance cosmology. These goals are achievable by combining muas-arcsecond astrometry from the proposed SIM-Lite mission supplemented with ground-based spectroscopy. The results of our proposed project will force the biggest reassessment of stellar astrophysics in 50 years, which will affect most branches of astrophysics.
  • The currently-favored model for long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) invokes explosions from the collapse of a massive star down to a black hole: either directly or through fallback. Those GRBs forming via fallback will produce much less radioactive nickel, and hence it has been argued (without any real calculation) that these systems produce dim supernovae. These fallback black-hole GRBs have been recently been argued as possible progenitors of a newly discovered set of GRBs lacking any associated supernovae. Here we present the first ever radiation-hydrodynamics calculations of the light-curves produced in the hypernova explosion by a delayed-fallback gamma-ray burst. We find that the bolometric light-curve is dominated by shock-deposited energy, not the decay of radioactive elements. As such, observations of such bursts actually probe the density in the progenitor wind more than it does the production of radioactive nickel.
  • Accurate stellar ages remain one of the most poorly constrained, but most desired, astronomical quantities. Here we briefly summarize some recent efforts to improve the stellar age scale from a subset of talks from the ``Stellar Ages'' splinter session at the "14th Cambridge Workshop on Cool Stars, Stellar Systems and the Sun". The topics discussed include both the apparent successes and alarming discrepancies in using Li depletion to age-date clusters, sources of uncertainty in ages due to input physics in evolutionary models, and recent results from asteroseismology and gyrochronology.
  • The collapsar engine behind long-duration gamma-ray bursts extracts the energy released from the rapid accretion of a collapsing star onto a stellar-massed black hole. In a collapsing star, this black hole can form in two ways: the direct collapse of the stellar core into a black hole and the delayed collapse of a black hole caused by fallback in a weak supernova explosion. In the case of a delayed-collapse black hole, the strong collapsar-driven explosion overtakes the weak supernova explosion before shock breakout, and it is very difficult to distinguish this black hole formation scenario from the direct collapse scenario. However, the delayed-collapse mechanism, with its double explosion, produces explosive nucleosynthetic yields that are very different from the direct collapse scenario. We present 1-dimensional studies of the nucleosynthetic yields from both black hole formation scenarios, deriving differences and trends in their nucleosynthetic yields.
  • Gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow observations have allowed us to significantly constrain the engines producing these energetic explosions. Te redshift and position information provided by these afterglows have already allowed us to limit the progenitors of GRBs to only a few models. The afterglows may also provide another observation that can place further constraints on the GRB progenitor: measurements telling us about the environments surrounding GRBs. Current analyses of GRB afterglows suggest that roughly half of long-duration gamma-ray bursts occur in surroundings with density profiles that are uniform. We study the constraints placed by this observation on both the classic ``collapsar'' massive star progenitor and its relative, the ``helium-merger'' progenitor. We study several aspects of wind mass-loss and find that our modifications to the standard Wolf-Rayet mass-loss paradigm are not sufficient to produce constant density profiles. Although this does not rule out the standard ``collapsar'' progenitor, it does suggest a deficiency with this model. We then focus on the He-merger models and find that such progenitors can fit this particular constraint well. We show how detailed observations can not only determine the correct progenitor for GRBs, but also allow us to study binary evolution physics.
  • We compare a suite of 3D explosion calculations and stellar models incorporating advanced physics with observational constraints on the progenitor of Cassiopeia A. We consider binary and single stars from 16 to 40 solar masses with a range of explosion energies and geometries. The parameter space allowed by observations of nitrogen rich high velocity ejecta, ejecta mass, compact remnant mass, and 44Ti and 56Ni abundances individually and as an ensemble is considered. A progenitor of 15-25 solar masses which loses its hydrogen envelope to a binary interaction and undergoes an energetic explosion can match all the observational constraints.
  • Recent multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations have demonstrated the importance of hydrodynamic motions in the convective boundary and radiative regions of stars to transport of energy, momentum, and composition. The impact of these processes increases with stellar mass. Stellar models which approximate this physics have been tested on several classes of observational problems. In this paper we examine the implications of the improved treatment on supernova progenitors. The improved models predict substantially different interior structures. We present pre-supernova conditions and simple explosion calculations from stellar models with and without the improved mixing treatment at 23 solar masses. The results differ substantially.
  • We examine contributions of second order physical processes to results of stellar evolution calculations amenable to direct observational testing. In the first paper in the series (Young et al. 2001) we established baseline results using only physics which are common to modern stellar evolution codes. In the current paper we establish how much of the discrepancy between observations and baseline models is due to particular elements of new physics. We then consider the impact of the observational uncertainties on the maximum predictive accuracy achievable by a stellar evolution code. The sun is an optimal case because of the precise and abundant observations and the relative simplicity of the underlying stellar physics. The Standard Model is capable of matching the structure of the sun as determined by helioseismology and gross surface observables to better than a percent. Given an initial mass and surface composition within the observational errors, and no additional constraints for which the models can be optimized, it is not possible to predict the sun's current state to better than ~7%. Convectively induced mixing in radiative regions, seen in multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations, dramatically improves the predictions for radii, luminosity, and apsidal motions of eclipsing binaries while simultaneously maintaining consistency with observed light element depletion and turnoff ages in young clusters (Young et al. 2003). Systematic errors in core size for models of massive binaries disappear with more complete mixing physics, and acceptable fits are achieved for all of the binaries without calibration of free parameters. The lack of accurate abundance determinations for binaries is now the main obstacle to improving stellar models using this type of test.