• Balloon releases are one of the main attractions of many fairs. Helium filled rubber balloons are released to carry postcards over preferably long distances. Although such balloons have been considered in atmospheric sciences and air safety analysis, there is only scarce literature available on the subject. This work intends to close this gap by providing a comprehensive theoretical overview and a thorough analysis of real-life data. All relevant physical properties of a rubber balloon are carefully modelled and supplemented by weather observations to form a self-contained trajectory simulation tool. The analysis of diverse balloon releases provided detailed insight into the flight dynamics and potential optimisations. Helium balloons are found to reach routinely altitudes above 10 km. Under optimal conditions, they could stay more than 24 hours airborne while reaching flight distances close to 3000 km. However, external weather effects reduce the typical lifetime to 2-5 hours.
  • Rocking rigid bodies appear in several shapes in everyday life: As furniture like rocking chairs and rocking cradles or as toys like rocking horses or tilting dolls. The familiar rocking motion of these objects, a non-linear combination of a rigid rotation and a translation of the center of mass, gives rise to a number of interesting dynamical properties. However, their study has received little attention in the literature. This work presents a comprehensive introduction to the dynamics of rocking rigid bodies, including a concise derivation of the equations of motion as well as a general inversion procedure to construct rocking rigid body shapes with specified dynamical properties. Moreover, two novel rigid body shapes are derived - the tautochrone shape and the brachistochrone shape - which represent an intriguing generalization of the well-know tautochrone and brachistochrone curves. In particular, tautochrone shapes offer an alternative construction of a tautochrone pendulum, in addition to Huygens' cycloid pendulum solution.
  • The formation and evolution of protoplanetary discs remains a challenge from both a theoretical and numerical standpoint. In this work we first perform a series of tests of our new hybrid algorithm presented in Glaschke, Amaro-Seoane and Spurzem 2011 (henceforth Paper I) that combines the advantages of high accuracy of direct-summation N-body methods with a statistical description for the planetesimal disc based on Fokker-Planck techniques. We then address the formation of planets, with a focus on the formation of protoplanets out of planetesimals. We find that the evolution of the system is driven by encounters as well as direct collisions and requires a careful modelling of the evolution of the velocity dispersion and the size distribution over a large range of sizes. The simulations show no termination of the protoplanetary accretion due to gap formation, since the distribution of the planetesimals is only subjected to small fluctuations. We also show that these features are weakly correlated with the positions of the protoplanets. The exploration of different impact strengths indicates that fragmentation mainly controls the overall mass loss, which is less pronounced during the early runaway growth. We prove that the fragmentation in combination with the effective removal of collisional fragments by gas drag sets an universal upper limit of the protoplanetary mass as a function of the distance to the host star, which we refer to as the mill condition.
  • The formation and evolution of protoplanetary systems, the breeding grounds of planet formation, is a complex dynamical problem that involves many orders of magnitudes. To serve this purpose, we present a new hybrid algorithm that combines a Fokker-Planck approach with the advantages of a pure direct-summation N-body scheme, with a very accurate integration of close encounters for the orbital evolution of the larger bodies with a statistical model, envisaged to simulate the very large number of smaller planetesimals in the disc. Direct-summation techniques have been historically developped for the study of dense stellar systems such as open and globular clusters and, within some limits imposed by the number of stars, of galactic nuclei. The number of modifications to adapt direct-summation N-body techniques to planetary dynamics is not undemanding and requires modifications. These include the way close encounters are treated, as well as the selection process for the "neighbour radius" of the particles and the extended Hermite scheme, used for the very first time in this work, as well as the implementation of a central potential, drag forces and the adjustment of the regularisation treatment. For the statistical description of the planetesimal disc we employ a Fokker-Planck approach. We include dynamical friction, high- and low-speed encounters, the role of distant encounters as well as gas and collisional damping and then generalise the model to inhomogenous discs. We then describe the combination of the two techniques to address the whole problem of planetesimal dynamics in a realistic way via a transition mass to integrate the evolution of the particles according to their masses.
  • The 88 constellations as defined by the IAU segment the sky into regions, separated by an intricate set of boundaries. A binary tree decomposition of this landscape is given which tessellates the celestial sphere into rectangles. This allows a fast determination of the constellation membership of any given sky coordinate.
  • We have studied the dynamical evolution of rotating globular clusters with direct $N$-body models. Our initial models are rotating King models; we obtained results for both equal-mass systems and systems composed out of two mass components. Previous investigations using a Fokker-Planck solver have revealed that rotation has a noticeable influence on stellar systems like globular clusters, which evolve by two-body relaxation. In particular, it accelerates their dynamical evolution through the gravogyro instability. We have validated the occurence of the gravogyro instability with direct $N$-body models. In the case of systems composed out of two mass components, mass segregation takes place, which competes with the rotation in the acceleration of the core collapse. The "accelerating" effect of rotation has not been detected in our isolated two-mass $N$-body models. Last, but not least, we have looked at rotating $N$-body models in a tidal field within the tidal approximation. It turns out that rotation increases the escape rate significantly. A difference between retrograde and prograde rotating star clusters occurs with respect to the orbit of the star cluster around the Galaxy, which is due to the presence of a ``third integral'' and chaotic scattering, respectively.