• Digital signatures are widely used to provide security for electronic communications, for example in financial transactions and electronic mail. Currently used classical digital signature schemes, however, only offer security relying on unproven computational assumptions. In contrast, quantum digital signatures (QDS) offer information-theoretic security based on laws of quantum mechanics (e.g. Gottesman and Chuang 2001). Here, security against forging relies on the impossibility of perfectly distinguishing between non-orthogonal quantum states. A serious drawback of previous QDS schemes is however that they require long-term quantum memory, making them unfeasible in practice. We present the first realisation of a scheme (Dunjko et al 2013) that does not need quantum memory, and which also uses only standard linear optical components and photodetectors. To achieve this, the recipients measure the distributed quantum signature states using a new type of quantum measurement, quantum state elimination (e.g. Barnett 2009, Bandyopadhyay et al 2013). This significantly advances QDS as a quantum technology with potential for real applications.
  • Digital signatures are frequently used in data transfer to prevent impersonation, repudiation and message tampering. Currently used classical digital signature schemes rely on public key encryption techniques, where the complexity of so-called "one-way" mathematical functions is used to provide security over sufficiently long timescales. No mathematical proofs are known for the long-term security of such techniques. Quantum digital signatures offer a means of sending a message which cannot be forged or repudiated, with security verified by information-theoretical limits and quantum mechanics. Here we demonstrate an experimental system which distributes quantum signatures from one sender to two receivers and enables message sending ensured against forging and repudiation. Additionally, we analyse the security of the system in some typical scenarios. The system is based on the interference of phase encoded coherent states of light and our implementation utilises polarisation maintaining optical fibre and photons with a wavelength of 850 nm.