• Data sharing among partners---users, organizations, companies---is crucial for the advancement of data analytics in many domains. Sharing through secure computation and differential privacy allows these partners to perform private computations on their sensitive data in controlled ways. However, in reality, there exist complex relationships among members. Politics, regulations, interest, trust, data demands and needs are one of the many reasons. Thus, there is a need for a mechanism to meet these conflicting relationships on data sharing. This paper presents Curie, an approach to exchange data among members whose membership has complex relationships. The CPL policy language that allows members to define the specifications of data exchange requirements is introduced. Members (partners) assert who and what to exchange through their local policies and negotiate a global sharing agreement. The agreement is implemented in a multi-party computation that guarantees sharing among members will comply with the policy as negotiated. The use of Curie is validated through an example of a health care application built on recently introduced secure multi-party computation and differential privacy frameworks, and policy and performance trade-offs are explored.
  • Adversarial examples are perturbed inputs designed to fool machine learning models. Adversarial training injects such examples into training data to increase robustness. To scale this technique to large datasets, perturbations are crafted using fast single-step methods that maximize a linear approximation of the model's loss. We show that this form of adversarial training converges to a degenerate global minimum, wherein small curvature artifacts near the data points obfuscate a linear approximation of the loss. The model thus learns to generate weak perturbations, rather than defend against strong ones. As a result, we find that adversarial training remains vulnerable to black-box attacks, where we transfer perturbations computed on undefended models, as well as to a powerful novel single-step attack that escapes the non-smooth vicinity of the input data via a small random step. We further introduce Ensemble Adversarial Training, a technique that augments training data with perturbations transferred from other models. On ImageNet, Ensemble Adversarial Training yields models with strong robustness to black-box attacks. In particular, our most robust model won the first round of the NIPS 2017 competition on Defenses against Adversarial Attacks.
  • CleverHans is a software library that provides standardized reference implementations of adversarial example construction techniques and adversarial training. The library may be used to develop more robust machine learning models and to provide standardized benchmarks of models' performance in the adversarial setting. Benchmarks constructed without a standardized implementation of adversarial example construction are not comparable to each other, because a good result may indicate a robust model or it may merely indicate a weak implementation of the adversarial example construction procedure. This technical report is structured as follows. Section 1 provides an overview of adversarial examples in machine learning and of the CleverHans software. Section 2 presents the core functionalities of the library: namely the attacks based on adversarial examples and defenses to improve the robustness of machine learning models to these attacks. Section 3 describes how to report benchmark results using the library. Section 4 describes the versioning system.
  • For well over a quarter century, detection systems have been driven by models learned from input features collected from real or simulated environments. An artifact (e.g., network event, potential malware sample, suspicious email) is deemed malicious or non-malicious based on its similarity to the learned model at runtime. However, the training of the models has been historically limited to only those features available at runtime. In this paper, we consider an alternate learning approach that trains models using "privileged" information--features available at training time but not at runtime--to improve the accuracy and resilience of detection systems. In particular, we adapt and extend recent advances in knowledge transfer, model influence, and distillation to enable the use of forensic or other data unavailable at runtime in a range of security domains. An empirical evaluation shows that privileged information increases precision and recall over a system with no privileged information: we observe up to 7.7% relative decrease in detection error for fast-flux bot detection, 8.6% for malware traffic detection, 7.3% for malware classification, and 16.9% for face recognition. We explore the limitations and applications of different privileged information techniques in detection systems. Such techniques provide a new means for detection systems to learn from data that would otherwise not be available at runtime.
  • Deep neural networks (DNNs) enable innovative applications of machine learning like image recognition, machine translation, or malware detection. However, deep learning is often criticized for its lack of robustness in adversarial settings (e.g., vulnerability to adversarial inputs) and general inability to rationalize its predictions. In this work, we exploit the structure of deep learning to enable new learning-based inference and decision strategies that achieve desirable properties such as robustness and interpretability. We take a first step in this direction and introduce the Deep k-Nearest Neighbors (DkNN). This hybrid classifier combines the k-nearest neighbors algorithm with representations of the data learned by each layer of the DNN: a test input is compared to its neighboring training points according to the distance that separates them in the representations. We show the labels of these neighboring points afford confidence estimates for inputs outside the model's training manifold, including on malicious inputs like adversarial examples--and therein provides protections against inputs that are outside the models understanding. This is because the nearest neighbors can be used to estimate the nonconformity of, i.e., the lack of support for, a prediction in the training data. The neighbors also constitute human-interpretable explanations of predictions. We evaluate the DkNN algorithm on several datasets, and show the confidence estimates accurately identify inputs outside the model, and that the explanations provided by nearest neighbors are intuitive and useful in understanding model failures.
  • Broadly defined as the Internet of Things (IoT), the growth of commodity devices that integrate physical processes with digital connectivity has had profound effects on society--smart homes, personal monitoring devices, enhanced manufacturing and other IoT apps have changed the way we live, play, and work. Yet extant IoT platforms provide few means of evaluating the use (and potential avenues for misuse) of sensitive information. Thus, consumers and organizations have little information to assess the security and privacy risks these devices present. In this paper, we present SainT, a static taint analysis tool for IoT applications. SainT operates in three phases; (a) translation of platform-specific IoT source code into an intermediate representation (IR), (b) identifying sensitive sources and sinks, and (c) performing static analysis to identify sensitive data flows. We evaluate SainT on 230 SmartThings market apps and find 138 (60%) include sensitive data flows. In addition, we demonstrate SainT on IoTBench, a novel open-source test suite containing 19 apps with 27 unique data leaks. Through this effort, we introduce a rigorously grounded framework for evaluating the use of sensitive information in IoT apps---and therein provide developers, markets, and consumers a means of identifying potential threats to security and privacy.
  • Online social network (OSN) discussion groups are exerting significant effects on political dialogue. In the absence of access control mechanisms, any user can contribute to any OSN thread. Individuals can exploit this characteristic to execute targeted attacks, which increases the potential for subsequent malicious behaviors such as phishing and malware distribution. These kinds of actions will also disrupt bridges among the media, politicians, and their constituencies. For the concern of Security Management, blending malicious cyberattacks with online social interactions has introduced a brand new challenge. In this paper we describe our proposal for a novel approach to studying and understanding the strategies that attackers use to spread malicious URLs across Facebook discussion groups. We define and analyze problems tied to predicting the potential for attacks focused on threads created by news media organizations. We use a mix of macro static features and the micro dynamic evolution of posts and threads to identify likely targets with greater than 90% accuracy. One of our secondary goals is to make such predictions within a short (10 minute) time frame. It is our hope that the data and analyses presented in this paper will support a better understanding of attacker strategies and footprints, thereby developing new system management methodologies in handing cyber attacks on social networks.
  • Machine Learning (ML) models are applied in a variety of tasks such as network intrusion detection or Malware classification. Yet, these models are vulnerable to a class of malicious inputs known as adversarial examples. These are slightly perturbed inputs that are classified incorrectly by the ML model. The mitigation of these adversarial inputs remains an open problem. As a step towards understanding adversarial examples, we show that they are not drawn from the same distribution than the original data, and can thus be detected using statistical tests. Using thus knowledge, we introduce a complimentary approach to identify specific inputs that are adversarial. Specifically, we augment our ML model with an additional output, in which the model is trained to classify all adversarial inputs. We evaluate our approach on multiple adversarial example crafting methods (including the fast gradient sign and saliency map methods) with several datasets. The statistical test flags sample sets containing adversarial inputs confidently at sample sizes between 10 and 100 data points. Furthermore, our augmented model either detects adversarial examples as outliers with high accuracy (> 80%) or increases the adversary's cost - the perturbation added - by more than 150%. In this way, we show that statistical properties of adversarial examples are essential to their detection.
  • The introduction of data analytics into medicine has changed the nature of patient treatment. In this, patients are asked to disclose personal information such as genetic markers, lifestyle habits, and clinical history. This data is then used by statistical models to predict personalized treatments. However, due to privacy concerns, patients often desire to withhold sensitive information. This self-censorship can impede proper diagnosis and treatment, which may lead to serious health complications and even death over time. In this paper, we present privacy distillation, a mechanism which allows patients to control the type and amount of information they wish to disclose to the healthcare providers for use in statistical models. Meanwhile, it retains the accuracy of models that have access to all patient data under a sufficient but not full set of privacy-relevant information. We validate privacy distillation using a corpus of patients prescribed to warfarin for a personalized dosage. We use a deep neural network to implement privacy distillation for training and making dose predictions. We find that privacy distillation with sufficient privacy-relevant information i) retains accuracy almost as good as having all patient data (only 3\% worse), and ii) is effective at preventing errors that introduce health-related risks (only 3.9\% worse under- or over-prescriptions).
  • The US Department of Energy decided in 2000 to treat its sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel, produced for experiments on breeder reactors, with an electrochemical process. The metallic waste produced is to be cast into ingots and the salt waste further processed to form a ceramic waste form for disposal in a mined repository. However, alternative disposal pathways for metallic and salt waste streams are being investigated that may reduce the processing complexity. As summarized here, performance assessments analyzing the direct disposal the salt waste demonstrate that both mined repositories in salt and deep boreholes in basement crystalline rock can easily accommodate the salt waste. Also summarized here is an analysis of the feasibility of transporting the salt waste in a proposed vessel. The vessel is viable for transport to and disposal in a generic mined repository in salt or deep borehole but a portion of the salt waste would need to be diluted for disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The generally positive results continue to demonstrate the feasibility of direct disposal of salt waste after electrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuel.
  • Sharing and working on sensitive data in distributed settings from healthcare to finance is a major challenge due to security and privacy concerns. Secure multiparty computation (SMC) is a viable panacea for this, allowing distributed parties to make computations while the parties learn nothing about their data, but the final result. Although SMC is instrumental in such distributed settings, it does not provide any guarantees not to leak any information about individuals to adversaries. Differential privacy (DP) can be utilized to address this; however, achieving SMC with DP is not a trivial task, either. In this paper, we propose a novel Secure Multiparty Distributed Differentially Private (SM-DDP) protocol to achieve secure and private computations in a multiparty environment. Specifically, with our protocol, we simultaneously achieve SMC and DP in distributed settings focusing on linear regression on horizontally distributed data. That is, parties do not see each others' data and further, can not infer information about individuals from the final constructed statistical model. Any statistical model function that allows independent calculation of local statistics can be computed through our protocol. The protocol implements homomorphic encryption for SMC and functional mechanism for DP to achieve the desired security and privacy guarantees. In this work, we first introduce the theoretical foundation for the SM-DDP protocol and then evaluate its efficacy and performance on two different datasets. Our results show that one can achieve individual-level privacy through the proposed protocol with distributed DP, which is independently applied by each party in a distributed fashion. Moreover, our results also show that the SM-DDP protocol incurs minimal computational overhead, is scalable, and provides security and privacy guarantees.
  • Adversarial examples are maliciously perturbed inputs designed to mislead machine learning (ML) models at test-time. They often transfer: the same adversarial example fools more than one model. In this work, we propose novel methods for estimating the previously unknown dimensionality of the space of adversarial inputs. We find that adversarial examples span a contiguous subspace of large (~25) dimensionality. Adversarial subspaces with higher dimensionality are more likely to intersect. We find that for two different models, a significant fraction of their subspaces is shared, thus enabling transferability. In the first quantitative analysis of the similarity of different models' decision boundaries, we show that these boundaries are actually close in arbitrary directions, whether adversarial or benign. We conclude by formally studying the limits of transferability. We derive (1) sufficient conditions on the data distribution that imply transferability for simple model classes and (2) examples of scenarios in which transfer does not occur. These findings indicate that it may be possible to design defenses against transfer-based attacks, even for models that are vulnerable to direct attacks.
  • Machine learning is vulnerable to adversarial examples: inputs carefully modified to force misclassification. Designing defenses against such inputs remains largely an open problem. In this work, we revisit defensive distillation---which is one of the mechanisms proposed to mitigate adversarial examples---to address its limitations. We view our results not only as an effective way of addressing some of the recently discovered attacks but also as reinforcing the importance of improved training techniques.
  • Machine learning (ML) models, e.g., deep neural networks (DNNs), are vulnerable to adversarial examples: malicious inputs modified to yield erroneous model outputs, while appearing unmodified to human observers. Potential attacks include having malicious content like malware identified as legitimate or controlling vehicle behavior. Yet, all existing adversarial example attacks require knowledge of either the model internals or its training data. We introduce the first practical demonstration of an attacker controlling a remotely hosted DNN with no such knowledge. Indeed, the only capability of our black-box adversary is to observe labels given by the DNN to chosen inputs. Our attack strategy consists in training a local model to substitute for the target DNN, using inputs synthetically generated by an adversary and labeled by the target DNN. We use the local substitute to craft adversarial examples, and find that they are misclassified by the targeted DNN. To perform a real-world and properly-blinded evaluation, we attack a DNN hosted by MetaMind, an online deep learning API. We find that their DNN misclassifies 84.24% of the adversarial examples crafted with our substitute. We demonstrate the general applicability of our strategy to many ML techniques by conducting the same attack against models hosted by Amazon and Google, using logistic regression substitutes. They yield adversarial examples misclassified by Amazon and Google at rates of 96.19% and 88.94%. We also find that this black-box attack strategy is capable of evading defense strategies previously found to make adversarial example crafting harder.
  • Advances in machine learning (ML) in recent years have enabled a dizzying array of applications such as data analytics, autonomous systems, and security diagnostics. ML is now pervasive---new systems and models are being deployed in every domain imaginable, leading to rapid and widespread deployment of software based inference and decision making. There is growing recognition that ML exposes new vulnerabilities in software systems, yet the technical community's understanding of the nature and extent of these vulnerabilities remains limited. We systematize recent findings on ML security and privacy, focusing on attacks identified on these systems and defenses crafted to date. We articulate a comprehensive threat model for ML, and categorize attacks and defenses within an adversarial framework. Key insights resulting from works both in the ML and security communities are identified and the effectiveness of approaches are related to structural elements of ML algorithms and the data used to train them. We conclude by formally exploring the opposing relationship between model accuracy and resilience to adversarial manipulation. Through these explorations, we show that there are (possibly unavoidable) tensions between model complexity, accuracy, and resilience that must be calibrated for the environments in which they will be used.
  • We report experimental results indicating that defensive distillation successfully mitigates adversarial samples crafted using the fast gradient sign method, in addition to those crafted using the Jacobian-based iterative attack on which the defense mechanism was originally evaluated.
  • Deep neural networks, like many other machine learning models, have recently been shown to lack robustness against adversarially crafted inputs. These inputs are derived from regular inputs by minor yet carefully selected perturbations that deceive machine learning models into desired misclassifications. Existing work in this emerging field was largely specific to the domain of image classification, since the high-entropy of images can be conveniently manipulated without changing the images' overall visual appearance. Yet, it remains unclear how such attacks translate to more security-sensitive applications such as malware detection - which may pose significant challenges in sample generation and arguably grave consequences for failure. In this paper, we show how to construct highly-effective adversarial sample crafting attacks for neural networks used as malware classifiers. The application domain of malware classification introduces additional constraints in the adversarial sample crafting problem when compared to the computer vision domain: (i) continuous, differentiable input domains are replaced by discrete, often binary inputs; and (ii) the loose condition of leaving visual appearance unchanged is replaced by requiring equivalent functional behavior. We demonstrate the feasibility of these attacks on many different instances of malware classifiers that we trained using the DREBIN Android malware data set. We furthermore evaluate to which extent potential defensive mechanisms against adversarial crafting can be leveraged to the setting of malware classification. While feature reduction did not prove to have a positive impact, distillation and re-training on adversarially crafted samples show promising results.
  • Many machine learning models are vulnerable to adversarial examples: inputs that are specially crafted to cause a machine learning model to produce an incorrect output. Adversarial examples that affect one model often affect another model, even if the two models have different architectures or were trained on different training sets, so long as both models were trained to perform the same task. An attacker may therefore train their own substitute model, craft adversarial examples against the substitute, and transfer them to a victim model, with very little information about the victim. Recent work has further developed a technique that uses the victim model as an oracle to label a synthetic training set for the substitute, so the attacker need not even collect a training set to mount the attack. We extend these recent techniques using reservoir sampling to greatly enhance the efficiency of the training procedure for the substitute model. We introduce new transferability attacks between previously unexplored (substitute, victim) pairs of machine learning model classes, most notably SVMs and decision trees. We demonstrate our attacks on two commercial machine learning classification systems from Amazon (96.19% misclassification rate) and Google (88.94%) using only 800 queries of the victim model, thereby showing that existing machine learning approaches are in general vulnerable to systematic black-box attacks regardless of their structure.
  • Machine learning models are frequently used to solve complex security problems, as well as to make decisions in sensitive situations like guiding autonomous vehicles or predicting financial market behaviors. Previous efforts have shown that numerous machine learning models were vulnerable to adversarial manipulations of their inputs taking the form of adversarial samples. Such inputs are crafted by adding carefully selected perturbations to legitimate inputs so as to force the machine learning model to misbehave, for instance by outputting a wrong class if the machine learning task of interest is classification. In fact, to the best of our knowledge, all previous work on adversarial samples crafting for neural network considered models used to solve classification tasks, most frequently in computer vision applications. In this paper, we contribute to the field of adversarial machine learning by investigating adversarial input sequences for recurrent neural networks processing sequential data. We show that the classes of algorithms introduced previously to craft adversarial samples misclassified by feed-forward neural networks can be adapted to recurrent neural networks. In a experiment, we show that adversaries can craft adversarial sequences misleading both categorical and sequential recurrent neural networks.
  • Deep learning algorithms have been shown to perform extremely well on many classical machine learning problems. However, recent studies have shown that deep learning, like other machine learning techniques, is vulnerable to adversarial samples: inputs crafted to force a deep neural network (DNN) to provide adversary-selected outputs. Such attacks can seriously undermine the security of the system supported by the DNN, sometimes with devastating consequences. For example, autonomous vehicles can be crashed, illicit or illegal content can bypass content filters, or biometric authentication systems can be manipulated to allow improper access. In this work, we introduce a defensive mechanism called defensive distillation to reduce the effectiveness of adversarial samples on DNNs. We analytically investigate the generalizability and robustness properties granted by the use of defensive distillation when training DNNs. We also empirically study the effectiveness of our defense mechanisms on two DNNs placed in adversarial settings. The study shows that defensive distillation can reduce effectiveness of sample creation from 95% to less than 0.5% on a studied DNN. Such dramatic gains can be explained by the fact that distillation leads gradients used in adversarial sample creation to be reduced by a factor of 10^30. We also find that distillation increases the average minimum number of features that need to be modified to create adversarial samples by about 800% on one of the DNNs we tested.
  • Application containers, such as Docker containers, have recently gained popularity as a solution for agile and seamless deployment of applications. These light-weight virtualization environments run applications that are packed together with their resources and configuration information, and thus can be deployed across various software platforms. However, these software ecosystems are not conducive to the true and tried security principles of privilege separation (PS) and principle of least privilege (PLP). We propose algorithms and a tool Cimplifier, which address these concerns in the context of containers. Specifically, given a container our tool partitions them into simpler containers, which are only provided enough resources to perform their functionality. As part our solution, we develop techniques for analyzing resource usage, for performing partitioning, and gluing the containers together to preserve functionality. Our evaluation on real-world containers demonstrates that Cimplifier can preserve the original functionality, leads to reduction in image size of 58-95%, and processes even large containers in under thirty seconds.
  • Deep learning takes advantage of large datasets and computationally efficient training algorithms to outperform other approaches at various machine learning tasks. However, imperfections in the training phase of deep neural networks make them vulnerable to adversarial samples: inputs crafted by adversaries with the intent of causing deep neural networks to misclassify. In this work, we formalize the space of adversaries against deep neural networks (DNNs) and introduce a novel class of algorithms to craft adversarial samples based on a precise understanding of the mapping between inputs and outputs of DNNs. In an application to computer vision, we show that our algorithms can reliably produce samples correctly classified by human subjects but misclassified in specific targets by a DNN with a 97% adversarial success rate while only modifying on average 4.02% of the input features per sample. We then evaluate the vulnerability of different sample classes to adversarial perturbations by defining a hardness measure. Finally, we describe preliminary work outlining defenses against adversarial samples by defining a predictive measure of distance between a benign input and a target classification.
  • The fields of study encompassed by cyber science and engineering are broad and poorly defined at this time. As national governments and research communities increase their recognition of the importance, urgency and technical richness of these disciplines, a question of priorities arises: what specific sub-areas of research should be the foci of attention and funding? In this paper we point to an approach to answering this question. We explore results of a recent workshop that postulated possible game-changers or disruptive changes that might occur in cyber security within the next 15 years. We suggest that such game-changers may be useful in focusing attention of research communities on high-priority topics. Indeed, if a drastic, important change is likely to occur, should we not focus our research efforts on the nature and ramifications of the phenomena pertaining to that change? We illustrate each of the game-changers examples of related current research, and then offer recommendations for advancement of cyber science and engineering with respect to each of the six game-changers.
  • Android applications may leak privacy data carelessly or maliciously. In this work we perform inter-component data-flow analysis to detect privacy leaks between components of Android applications. Unlike all current approaches, our tool, called IccTA, propagates the context between the components, which improves the precision of the analysis. IccTA outperforms all other available tools by reaching a precision of 95.0% and a recall of 82.6% on DroidBench. Our approach detects 147 inter-component based privacy leaks in 14 applications in a set of 3000 real-world applications with a precision of 88.4%. With the help of ApkCombiner, our approach is able to detect inter-app based privacy leaks.