• This paper investigates the behavior of the Min-Sum message passing scheme to solve systems of linear equations in the Laplacian matrices of graphs and to compute electric flows. Voltage and flow problems involve the minimization of quadratic functions and are fundamental primitives that arise in several domains. Algorithms that have been proposed are typically centralized and involve multiple graph-theoretic constructions or sampling mechanisms that make them difficult to implement and analyze. On the other hand, message passing routines are distributed, simple, and easy to implement. In this paper we establish a framework to analyze Min-Sum to solve voltage and flow problems. We characterize the error committed by the algorithm on general weighted graphs in terms of hitting times of random walks defined on the computation trees that support the operations of the algorithms with time. For $d$-regular graphs with equal weights, we show that the convergence of the algorithms is controlled by the total variation distance between the distributions of non-backtracking random walks defined on the original graph that start from neighboring nodes. The framework that we introduce extends the analysis of Min-Sum to settings where the contraction arguments previously considered in the literature (based on the assumption of walk summability or scaled diagonal dominance) can not be used, possibly in the presence of constraints.
  • In probability theory and statistics notions of correlation among random variables, decay of correlation, and bias-variance trade-off are fundamental. In this work we introduce analogous notions in optimization, and we show their usefulness in a concrete setting. We propose a general notion of correlation among variables in optimization procedures that is based on the sensitivity of optimal points upon (possibly finite) perturbations. We present a canonical instance in network optimization (the min-cost network flow problem) that exhibits locality, i.e., a setting where the correlation decays as a function of the graph-theoretical distance in the network. In the case of warm-start reoptimization, we develop a general approach to localize a given optimization routine in order to exploit locality. We show that the localization mechanism is responsible for introducing a bias in the original algorithm, and that the bias-variance trade-off that emerges can be exploited to minimize the computational complexity required to reach a prescribed level of error accuracy. We provide numerical evidence to support our claims.
  • We apply the Min-Sum message-passing protocol to solve the consensus problem in distributed optimization. We show that while the ordinary Min-Sum algorithm does not converge, a modified version of it known as Splitting yields convergence to the problem solution. We prove that a proper choice of the tuning parameters allows Min-Sum Splitting to yield subdiffusive accelerated convergence rates, matching the rates obtained by shift-register methods. The acceleration scheme embodied by Min-Sum Splitting for the consensus problem bears similarities with lifted Markov chains techniques and with multi-step first order methods in convex optimization.
  • We investigate the fundamental principles that drive the development of scalable algorithms for network optimization. Despite the significant amount of work on parallel and decentralized algorithms in the optimization community, the methods that have been proposed typically rely on strict separability assumptions for objective function and constraints. Beside sparsity, these methods typically do not exploit the strength of the interaction between variables in the system. We propose a notion of correlation in constrained optimization that is based on the sensitivity of the optimal solution upon perturbations of the constraints. We develop a general theory of sensitivity of optimizers the extends beyond the infinitesimal setting. We present instances in network optimization where the correlation decays exponentially fast with respect to the natural distance in the network, and we design algorithms that can exploit this decay to yield dimension-free optimization. Our results are the first of their kind, and open new possibilities in the theory of local algorithms.
  • The discovery of particle filtering methods has enabled the use of nonlinear filtering in a wide array of applications. Unfortunately, the approximation error of particle filters typically grows exponentially in the dimension of the underlying model. This phenomenon has rendered particle filters of limited use in complex data assimilation problems. In this paper, we argue that it is often possible, at least in principle, to develop local particle filtering algorithms whose approximation error is dimension-free. The key to such developments is the decay of correlations property, which is a spatial counterpart of the much better understood stability property of nonlinear filters. For the simplest possible algorithm of this type, our results provide under suitable assumptions an approximation error bound that is uniform both in time and in the model dimension. More broadly, our results provide a framework for the investigation of filtering problems and algorithms in high dimension.
  • We investigate the systematic mechanism for designing fast mixing Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms to sample from discrete point processes under the Dobrushin uniqueness condition for Gibbs measures. Discrete point processes are defined as probability distributions $\mu(S)\propto \exp(\beta f(S))$ over all subsets $S\in 2^V$ of a finite set $V$ through a bounded set function $f:2^V\rightarrow \mathbb{R}$ and a parameter $\beta>0$. A subclass of discrete point processes characterized by submodular functions (which include log-submodular distributions, submodular point processes, and determinantal point processes) has recently gained a lot of interest in machine learning and shown to be effective for modeling diversity and coverage. We show that if the set function (not necessarily submodular) displays a natural notion of decay of correlation, then, for $\beta$ small enough, it is possible to design fast mixing Markov chain Monte Carlo methods that yield error bounds on marginal approximations that do not depend on the size of the set $V$. The sufficient conditions that we derive involve a control on the (discrete) Hessian of set functions, a quantity that has not been previously considered in the literature. We specialize our results for submodular functions, and we discuss canonical examples where the Hessian can be easily controlled.
  • It has been established under very general conditions that the ergodic properties of Markov processes are inherited by their conditional distributions given partial information. While the existing theory provides a rather complete picture of classical filtering models, many infinite-dimensional problems are outside its scope. Far from being a technical issue, the infinite-dimensional setting gives rise to surprising phenomena and new questions in filtering theory. The aim of this paper is to discuss some elementary examples, conjectures, and general theory that arise in this setting, and to highlight connections with problems in statistical mechanics and ergodic theory. In particular, we exhibit a simple example of a uniformly ergodic model in which ergodicity of the filter undergoes a phase transition, and we develop some qualitative understanding as to when such phenomena can and cannot occur. We also discuss closely related problems in the setting of conditional Markov random fields.
  • The Dobrushin comparison theorem is a powerful tool to bound the difference between the marginals of high-dimensional probability distributions in terms of their local specifications. Originally introduced to prove uniqueness and decay of correlations of Gibbs measures, it has been widely used in statistical mechanics as well as in the analysis of algorithms on random fields and interacting Markov chains. However, the classical comparison theorem requires validity of the Dobrushin uniqueness criterion, essentially restricting its applicability in most models to a small subset of the natural parameter space. In this paper we develop generalized Dobrushin comparison theorems in terms of influences between blocks of sites, in the spirit of Dobrushin-Shlosman and Weitz, that substantially extend the range of applicability of the classical comparison theorem. Our proofs are based on the analysis of an associated family of Markov chains. We develop in detail an application of our main results to the analysis of sequential Monte Carlo algorithms for filtering in high dimension.