• The hole doped Si(111)(2root3x2root3)R30(degrees)-Sn interface exhibits a symmetry-breaking insulator-insulator transition below 100 K that appears to be triggered by electron tunneling into the empty surface-state bands. No such transition is seen in electron-doped systems. To elucidate the nature and driving force of this phenomenon, the structure of the interface must be resolved. Here we report on an extensive experimental and theoretical study, including scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS), dynamical low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) analysis, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, to elucidate the structure of this interface. We consider six different structure models, three of which have been proposed before, and conclude that only two of them can account for the majority of experimental data. One of them is the model according to Tornevik et al. [C. Tornevik et al., Phys. Rev. B 44, 13144 (1991)] with a total Sn coverage of 14/12 monolayers (ML). The other is the 'revised trimer model' with a total Sn coverage of 13/12 ML, introduced in this work. These two models are very difficult to discriminate on the basis of DFT or LEED alone, but STS data clearly point toward the T\"ornevik model as the most viable candidate among the models considered here. The STS data also provide additional insights regarding the electron-injection-driven phase transformation as well as the critical role of valence band holes in this process. Similar processes may occur at other metal/semiconductor interfaces, provided they are non-metallic and can be doped. This could open up a new pathway toward the creation of novel surface phases with potentially very interesting and desirable electronic properties.
  • Recent advances in scanning transmission electron and scanning tunneling microscopies allow researchers to measure materials structural and electronic properties, such as atomic displacements and charge density modulations, at an Angstrom scale in real space. At the same time, the ability to quickly acquire large, high-resolution datasets has created a challenge for rapid physics-based analysis of images that typically contain several hundreds to several thousand atomic units. Here we demonstrate a universal deep-learning based framework for locating and characterizing atomic species in the lattice, which can be applied to different types of atomically resolved measurements on different materials. Specifically, by inspecting and categorizing features in the output layer of a convolutional neural network, we are able to detect structural and electronic 'anomalies' associated with the presence of point defects in a tungsten disulfide monolayer, non-uniformity of the charge density distribution around specific lattice sites on the surface of strongly correlated oxides, and transition between different structural states of buckybowl molecules. We further extended our method towards tracking, from one image frame to another, minute distortions in the geometric shape of individual Si dumbbells in a 3-dimensional Si sample, which are associated with a motion of lattice defects and impurities. Due the applicability of our framework to both scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements, it can provide a fast and straightforward way towards creating a unified database of defect-property relationships from experimental data for each material.
  • Adsorption of 1/3 monolayer of Sn on a heavily-doped p-type Si(111) substrate results in the formation of a hole-doped Mott insulator, with electronic properties that are remarkably similar to those of the high-Tc copper oxide compounds. In this work, we show that the maximum hole-density of this system increases with decreasing domain size as the area of the Mott insulating domains approaches the nanoscale regime. Concomitantly, scanning tunneling spectroscopy data at 4.4 K reveal an increasingly prominent zero bias anomaly (ZBA). We consider two different scenarios as potential mechanisms for this ZBA: chiral d_(x^2 -y^2 )+ id_xy wave superconductivity and a dynamical Coulomb blockade (DCB) effect. The latter arises due to the formation of a resistive depletion layer between the nano-domains and the substrate. Both models fit the tunneling spectra with weaker ZBAs, while the DCB model clearly fits better to spectra recorded at higher temperatures or from the smallest domains with the strongest ZBA. Consistently, STS spectra from the lightly-doped substrates display oscillatory behavior that can be attributed to conventional Coulomb staircase behavior, which becomes stronger for smaller sized domains. We conclude that the ZBA is predominantly due to a DCB effect, while a superconducting instability is absent or a minor contributing factor.
  • The physics of doped Mott insulators is at the heart of some of the most exotic physical phenomena in materials research including insulator-metal transitions, colossal magneto-resistance, and high-temperature superconductivity in layered perovskite compounds. Advances in this field would greatly benefit from the availability of new material systems with similar richness of physical phenomena, but with fewer chemical and structural complications in comparison to oxides. Using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, we show that such a system can be realized on a silicon platform. Adsorption of one-third monolayer of Sn atoms on a Si(111) surface produces a triangular surface lattice with half-filled dangling bond orbitals. Modulation hole-doping of these dangling bonds unveils clear hallmarks of Mott physics, such as spectral weight transfer and the formation of quasi-particle states at the Fermi level, well-defined Fermi contour segments, and a sharp singularity in the density of states. These observations are remarkably similar to those made in complex oxide materials, including high-temperature superconductors, but highly extraordinary within the realm of conventional sp-bonded semiconductor materials. It suggests that exotic quantum matter phases can be realized and engineered on silicon-based materials platforms.
  • Strontium titanate (SrTiO3, STO) is a critically important material for the study of emergent electronic phases in complex oxides, as well as for the development of applications based on their heterostructures. Despite the large body of knowledge on STO, there are still many uncertainties regarding the role of defects in the properties of STO, including their influence on ferroelectricity in bulk STO and ferromagnetism in STO-based heterostructures. We present a detailed analysis of the decay of persistent photoconductivity in STO single crystals with defect concentrations that are relatively low but significantly affect their electronic properties. The results show that photo-activated electron transport cannot be described by a superposition of the properties due to independent point defects as current models suggest but is, instead, governed by defect complexes that interact through dynamic correlations. These results emphasize the importance of defect correlations for activated electronic transport properties of semiconducting and insulating perovskite oxides.
  • The availability of low-index rutile TiO2 single crystal substrates with atomically flat surfaces is essential for enabling epitaxial growth of rutile transition metal oxide films. The high surface energy of the rutile (001) surface often leads to surface faceting, which precludes the sputter and annealing treatment commonly used for the preparation of clean and atomically flat TiO2(110) substrate surfaces. In this work, we reveal that stable and atomically flat rutile TiO2(001) surfaces can be prepared with an atomically ordered reconstructed surface already during a furnace annealing treatment in air. We tentatively ascribe this result to the decrease in surface energy associated with the surface reconstruction, which removes the driving force for faceting. Despite the narrow temperature window where this morphology can initially be formed, we demonstrate that it persists in homoepitaxial growth of TiO2(001) thin films. The stabilization of surface reconstructions that prevent faceting of high-surface-energy crystal faces may offer a promising avenue towards the realization of a wider range of high quality epitaxial transition metal oxide heterostructures.
  • We introduce the concept of optical control of the fluorescence yield of CdSe quantum dots through plasmon-induced structural changes in random semicontinuous nanostructured gold films. We demonstrate that the wavelength- and polarization dependent coupling between quantum dots and the semicontinuous films, and thus the fluorescent emission spectrum, can be controlled and significantly increased through the optical extinction of a selective band of eigenmodes in the films. This optical method of effecting controlled changes in the metal nanostructure allows for versatile functionality in a single sample and opens a pathway to in situ control over the fluorescence spectrum.
  • The chemical bonding of adsorbate molecules on transition-metal surfaces is strongly influenced by the hybridization between the molecular orbitals and the metal d-band. The strength of this interaction is often correlated with the location of the metal d-band center relative to the Fermi level. Here, we exploit finite size effects in the electronic structure of ultrathin Pd(111) films grown on Ru(0001) to tune their reactivity by changing the film thickness one atom layer at a time, while keeping all other variables unchanged. Interestingly, while bulk Pd(111) is reactive towards oxygen, Pd(111) films below five monolayers are surprisingly inert. This observation is fully in line with the d-band model prediction when applied to the orbitals involved in the bonding. The shift of the d-band center with film thickness is primarily attributed to shifts in the partial density of states associated with the 4dxz and 4dyz orbitals. This study gives an in-depth look into the orbital specific contributions to the surface chemical reactivity, providing new insights that could be useful in surface catalysis.
  • We report on the use of helium ion implantation to independently control the out-of-plane lattice constant in epitaxial La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 thin films without changing the in-plane lattice constants. The process is reversible by a vacuum anneal. Resistance and magnetization measurements show that even a small increase in the out-of-plane lattice constant of less than 1% can shift the metal-insulator transition and Curie temperatures by more than 100 {\deg}C. Unlike conventional epitaxy-based strain tuning methods which are constrained not only by the Poisson effect but by the limited set of available substrates, the present study shows that strain can be independently and continuously controlled along a single axis. This permits novel control over orbital populations through Jahn-Teller effects, as shown by Monte Carlo simulations on a double-exchange model. The ability to reversibly control a single lattice parameter substantially broadens the phase space for experimental exploration of predictive models and leads to new possibilities for control over materials' functional properties.
  • The configuration and evolution of coexisting mesoscopic domains with contrasting material properties are critical in creating novel functionality through emergent physical properties. However, current approaches that map the domain structure involve either spatially resolved but protracted scanning probe experiments without real time information on the domain evolution, or time resolved spectroscopic experiments lacking domain-scale spatial resolution. We demonstrate an elegant experimental technique that bridges these local and global methods, giving access to mesoscale information on domain formation and evolution at time scales orders of magnitude faster than current spatially resolved approaches. Our straightforward analysis of laser speckle patterns across the first order phase transition of VO$_2$ can be generalized to other systems with large scale phase separation and has potential as a powerful method with both spatial and temporal resolution to study phase separation in complex materials.
  • Organic spintronic devices have been appealing because of the long spin life time of the charge carriers in the organic materials and their low cost, flexibility and chemical diversity. In previous studies, the control of resistance of organic spin valves is generally achieved by the alignment of the magnetization directions of the two ferromagnetic electrodes, generating magnetoresistance.1 Here we employ a new knob to tune the resistance of organic spin valves by adding a thin ferroelectric interfacial layer between the ferromagnetic electrode and the organic spacer. We show that the resistance can be controlled by not only the spin alignment of the two ferromagnetic electrodes, but also by the electric polarization of the interfacial ferroelectric layer: the MR of the spin valve depends strongly on the history of the bias voltage which is correlated with the polarization of the ferroelectric layer; the MR even changes sign when the electric polarization of the ferroelectric layer is reversed. This new tunability can be understood in terms of the change of relative energy level alignment between ferromagnetic electrode and the organic spacer caused by the electric dipole moment of the ferroelectric layer. These findings enable active control of resistance using both electric and magnetic fields, opening up possibility for multi-state organic spin valves and shed light on the mechanism of the spin transport in organic spin valves.
  • The oxygen stoichiometry has a large influence on the physical and chemical properties of complex oxides. Most of the functionality in e.g. catalysis and electrochemistry depends in particular on control of the oxygen stoichiometry. In order to understand the fundamental properties of intrinsic surfaces of oxygen-deficient complex oxides, we report on in situ temperature dependent scanning tunnelling spectroscopy experiments on pristine oxygen deficient, epitaxial manganite films. Although these films are insulating in subsequent ex situ in-plane electronic transport experiments at all temperatures, in situ scanning tunnelling spectroscopic data reveal that the surface of these films exhibits a metal-insulator transition (MIT) at 120 K, coincident with the onset of ferromagnetic ordering of small clusters in the bulk of the oxygen-deficient film. The surprising proximity of the surface MIT transition temperature of nonstoichiometric films with that of the fully oxygenated bulk suggests that the electronic properties in the surface region are not significantly affected by oxygen deficiency in the bulk. This carries important implications for the understanding and functional design of complex oxides and their interfaces with specific electronic properties for catalysis, oxide electronics and electrochemistry.
  • An experimental study was conducted on controlling the growth mode of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 thin films on SrTiO3 substrates using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) by tuning growth temperature, pressure and laser fluence. Different thin film morphology, crystallinity and stoichiometry have been observed depending on growth parameters. To understand the microscopic origin, the adatom nucleation, step advance processes and their relationship to film growth were theoretically analyzed and a growth diagram was constructed. Three boundaries between highly and poorly crystallized growth, 2D and 3D growth, stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric growth were identified in the growth diagram. A good fit of our experimental observation with the growth diagram was found. This case study demonstrates that a more comprehensive understanding of the growth mode in PLD is possible.
  • The crystal and magnetic structures of single-crystalline hexagonal LuFeO$_3$ films have been studied using x-ray, electron and neutron diffraction methods. The polar structure of these films are found to persist up to 1050 K; and the switchability of the polar behavior is observed at room temperature, indicating ferroelectricity. An antiferromagnetic order was shown to occur below 440 K, followed by a spin reorientation resulting in a weak ferromagnetic order below 130 K. This observation of coexisting multiple ferroic orders demonstrates that hexagonal LuFeO$_3$ films are room-temperature multiferroics.
  • A growth diagram of Lu-Fe-O compounds on MgO (111) substrates using pulsed laser deposition is constructed based on extensive growth experiments. The LuFe$_2$O$_4$ phase can only be grown in a small range of temperature and O$_2$ pressure conditions. An understanding of the growth mechanism of Lu-Fe-O compound films is offered in terms of the thermochemistry at the surface. Superparamagnetism is observed in LuFe$_2$O$_4$ film and is explained in terms of the effect of the impurity h-LuFeO$_3$ phase and structural defects .