• We establish large deviation principles (LDPs) for empirical measures associated with a sequence of Gibbs distributions on $n$-particle configurations, each of which is defined in terms of an inverse temperature $% \beta_n$ and an energy functional consisting of a (possibly singular) interaction potential and a (possibly weakly) confining potential. Under fairly general assumptions on the potentials, we use a common framework to establish LDPs both with speeds $\beta_n/n \rightarrow \infty$, in which case the rate function is expressed in terms of a functional involving the potentials, and with speed $\beta_n =n$, when the rate function contains an additional entropic term. Such LDPs are motivated by questions arising in random matrix theory, sampling, simulated annealing and asymptotic convex geometry. Our approach, which uses the weak convergence method developed by Dupuis and Ellis, establishes LDPs with respect to stronger Wasserstein-type topologies. Our results address several interesting examples not covered by previous works, including the case of a weakly confining potential, which allows for rate functions with minimizers that do not have compact support, thus resolving several open questions raised in a work of Chafa\"{\i} et al.
  • We prove a large deviation principle (LDP) for a general class of Banach space valued stochastic differential equations (SDE) that is uniform with respect to initial conditions in bounded subsets of the Banach space. A key step in the proof is showing that a uniform large deviation principle over compact sets is implied by a uniform over compact sets Laplace principle. Because bounded subsets of infinite dimensional Banach spaces are in general not relatively compact in the norm topology, we embed the Banach space into its double dual and utilize the weak-$\star $ compactness of closed bounded sets in the double dual space. We prove that a modified version of our stochastic differential equation satisfies a uniform Laplace principle over weak-$\star $ compact sets and consequently a uniform over bounded sets large deviation principle. We then transfer this result back to the original equation using a contraction principle. The main motivation for this uniform LDP is to generalize results of Freidlin and Wentzell concerning the behavior of finite dimensional SDEs. Here we apply the uniform LDP to study the asymptotics of exit times from bounded sets of Banach space valued small noise SDE, including reaction diffusion equations with multiplicative noise and $2$-dimensional stochastic Navier-Stokes equations with multiplicative noise.
  • The configuration model is a sequence of random graphs constructed such that in the large network limit the degree distribution converges to a pre-specified probability distribution. The component structure of such random graphs can be obtained from an infinite dimensional Markov chain referred to as the exploration process. We establish a large deviation principle for the exploration process associated with the configuration model. Proofs rely on a representation of the exploration process as a system of stochastic differential equations driven by Poisson random measures and variational formulas for moments of nonnegative functionals of Poisson random measures. Uniqueness results for certain controlled systems of deterministic equations play a key role in the analysis. Applications of the large deviation results, for studying asymptotic behavior of the degree sequence in large components of the random graphs, are discussed.
  • A large deviation principle is established for a two-scale stochastic system in which the slow component is a continuous process given by a small noise finite dimensional It\^{o} stochastic differential equation, and the fast component is a finite state pure jump process. Previous works have considered settings where the coupling between the components is weak in a certain sense. In the current work we study a fully coupled system in which the drift and diffusion coefficient of the slow component and the jump intensity function and jump distribution of the fast process depend on the states of both components. In addition, the diffusion can be degenerate. Our proofs use certain stochastic control representations for expectations of exponential functionals of finite dimensional Brownian motions and Poisson random measures together with weak convergence arguments. A key challenge is in the proof of the large deviation lower bound where, due to the interplay between the degeneracy of the diffusion and the full dependence of the coefficients on the two components, the associated local rate function has poor regularity properties.
  • Parallel tempering, or replica exchange, is a popular method for simulating complex systems. The idea is to run parallel simulations at different temperatures, and at a given swap rate exchange configurations between the parallel simulations. From the perspective of large deviations it is optimal to let the swap rate tend to infinity and it is possible to construct a corresponding simulation scheme, known as infinite swapping. In this paper we propose a novel use of large deviations for empirical measures for a more detailed analysis of the infinite swapping limit in the setting of continuous time jump Markov processes. Using the large deviations rate function and associated stochastic control problems we consider a diagnostic based on temperature assignments, which can be easily computed during a simulation. We show that the convergence of this diagnostic to its a priori known limit is a necessary condition for the convergence of infinite swapping. The rate function is also used to investigate the impact of asymmetries in the underlying potential landscape, and where in the state space poor sampling is most likely to occur.
  • We establish a large deviation principle for the empirical measure process associated with a general class of finite-state mean field interacting particle systems with Lipschitz continuous transition rates that satisfy a certain ergodicity condition. The approach is based on a variational representation for functionals of a Poisson random measure. Under an appropriate strengthening of the ergodicity condition, we also prove a locally uniform large deviation principle. The main novelty is that more than one particle is allowed to change its state simultaneously, and so a standard approach to the proof based on a change of measure with respect to a system of independent particles is not possible. The result is shown to be applicable to a wide range of models arising from statistical physics, queueing systems and communication networks. Along the way, we establish a large deviation principle for a class of jump Markov processes on the simplex, whose rates decay to zero as they approach the boundary of the domain. This result may be of independent interest.
  • We discuss importance sampling schemes for the estimation of finite time exit probabilities of small noise diffusions that involve escape from an equilibrium. A factor that complicates the analysis is that rest points are included in the domain of interest. We build importance sampling schemes with provably good performance both pre-asymptotically, that is, for fixed size of the noise, and asymptotically, that is, as the size of the noise goes to zero, and that do not degrade as the time horizon gets large. Simulation studies demonstrate the theoretical results.
  • Uncertainty quantification is a primary challenge for reliable modeling and simulation of complex stochastic dynamics. Such problems are typically plagued with incomplete information that may enter as uncertainty in the model parameters, or even in the model itself. Furthermore, due to their dynamic nature, we need to assess the impact of these uncertainties on the transient and long-time behavior of the stochastic models and derive corresponding uncertainty bounds for observables of interest. A special class of such challenges is parametric uncertainties in the model and in particular sensitivity analysis along with the corresponding sensitivity bounds for stochastic dynamics. Moreover, sensitivity analysis can be further complicated in models with a high number of parameters that render straightforward approaches, such as gradient methods, impractical. In this paper, we derive uncertainty and sensitivity bounds for path-space observables of stochastic dynamics in terms of new goal-oriented divergences; the latter incorporate both observables and information theory objects such as the relative entropy rate. These bounds are tight, depend on the variance of the particular observable and are computable through Monte Carlo simulation. In the case of sensitivity analysis, the derived sensitivity bounds rely on the path Fisher Information Matrix, hence they depend only on local dynamics and are gradient-free. These features allow for computationally efficient implementation in systems with a high number of parameters, e.g., complex reaction networks and molecular simulations.
  • The large deviations principle for the empirical measure for both continuous and discrete time Markov processes is well known. Various expressions are available for the rate function, but these expressions are usually as the solution to a variational problem, and in this sense not explicit. An interesting class of continuous time, reversible processes was identified in the original work of Donsker and Varadhan for which an explicit expression is possible. While this class includes many (reversible) processes of interest, it excludes the case of continuous time pure jump processes, such as a reversible finite state Markov chain. In this paper, we study the large deviations principle for the empirical measure of pure jump Markov processes and provide an explicit formula of the rate function under reversibility.
  • The limits of scaled relative entropies between probability distributions associated with N-particle weakly interacting Markov processes are considered. The convergence of such scaled relative entropies is established in various settings. The analysis is motivated by the role relative entropy plays as a Lyapunov function for the (linear) Kolmogorov forward equation associated with an ergodic Markov process, and Lyapunov function properties of these scaling limits with respect to nonlinear finite-state Markov processes are studied in the companion paper [6].
  • The focus of this work is on local stability of a class of nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODE) that describe limits of empirical measures associated with finite-state weakly interacting N-particle systems. Local Lyapunov functions are identified for several classes of such ODE, including those associated with systems with slow adaptation and Gibbs systems. Using results from [5] and large deviations heuristics, a partial differential equation (PDE) associated with the nonlinear ODE is introduced and it is shown that positive definite subsolutions of this PDE serve as local Lyapunov functions for the ODE. This PDE characterization is used to construct explicit Lyapunov functions for a broad class of models called locally Gibbs systems. This class of models is significantly larger than the family of Gibbs systems and several examples of such systems are presented, including models with nearest neighbor jumps and models with simultaneous jumps that arise in applications.
  • We introduce and illustrate a number of performance measures for rare-event sampling methods. These measures are designed to be of use in a variety of expanded ensemble techniques including parallel tempering as well as infinite and partial infinite swapping approaches. Using a variety of selected applications we address questions concerning the variation of sampling performance with respect to key computational ensemble parameters.
  • Moderate deviation principles for stochastic differential equations driven by a Poisson random measure (PRM) in finite and infinite dimensions are obtained. Proofs are based on a variational representation for expected values of positive functionals of a PRM.
  • We prove a moderate deviation principle for the continuous time interpolation of discrete time recursive stochastic processes. The methods of proof are somewhat different from the corresponding large deviation result, and in particular the proof of the upper bound is more complicated. The results can be applied to the design of accelerated Monte Carlo algorithms for certain problems, where schemes based on moderate deviations are easier to construct and in certain situations provide performance comparable to those based on large deviations.
  • We extend the duality between exponential integrals and relative entropy to a variational formula for exponential integrals involving the Renyi divergence. This formula characterizes the dependence of risk-sensitive functionals and related quantities determined by tail behavior to perturbations in the underlying distributions, in terms of the Renyi divergence. The characterization gives rise to upper and lower bounds that are meaningful for all values of a large deviation scaling parameter, allowing one to quantify in explicit terms the robustness of risk-sensitive costs. As applications we consider problems of uncertainty quantification when aspects of the model are not fully known, as well their use in bounding tail properties of an intractable model in terms of a tractable one.
  • We study large deviation properties of systems of weakly interacting particles modeled by It\^{o} stochastic differential equations (SDEs). It is known under certain conditions that the corresponding sequence of empirical measures converges, as the number of particles tends to infinity, to the weak solution of an associated McKean-Vlasov equation. We derive a large deviation principle via the weak convergence approach. The proof, which avoids discretization arguments, is based on a representation theorem, weak convergence and ideas from stochastic optimal control. The method works under rather mild assumptions and also for models described by SDEs not of diffusion type. To illustrate this, we treat the case of SDEs with delay.
  • Stochastic partial differential equations driven by Poisson random measures (PRM) have been proposed as models for many different physical systems, where they are viewed as a refinement of a corresponding noiseless partial differential equations (PDE). A systematic framework for the study of probabilities of deviations of the stochastic PDE from the deterministic PDE is through the theory of large deviations. The goal of this work is to develop the large deviation theory for small Poisson noise perturbations of a general class of deterministic infinite dimensional models. Although the analogous questions for finite dimensional systems have been well studied, there are currently no general results in the infinite dimensional setting. This is in part due to the fact that in this setting solutions may have little spatial regularity, and thus classical approximation methods for large deviation analysis become intractable. The approach taken here, which is based on a variational representation for nonnegative functionals of general PRM, reduces the proof of the large deviation principle to establishing basic qualitative properties for controlled analogues of the underlying stochastic system. As an illustration of the general theory, we consider a particular system that models the spread of a pollutant in a waterway.
  • In the present paper we identify a rigorous property of a number of tempering-based Monte Carlo sampling methods, including parallel tempering as well as partial and infinite swapping. Based on this property we develop a variety of performance measures for such rare-event sampling methods that are broadly applicable, informative, and straightforward to implement. We illustrate the use of these performance measures with a series of applications involving the equilibrium properties of simple Lennard-Jones clusters, applications for which the performance levels of partial and infinite swapping approaches are found to be higher than those of conventional parallel tempering.
  • Parallel tempering, also known as replica exchange sampling, is an important method for simulating complex systems. In this algorithm simulations are conducted in parallel at a series of temperatures, and the key feature of the algorithm is a swap mechanism that exchanges configurations between the parallel simulations at a given rate. The mechanism is designed to allow the low temperature system of interest to escape from deep local energy minima where it might otherwise be trapped, via those swaps with the higher temperature components. In this paper we introduce a performance criteria for such schemes based on large deviation theory, and argue that the rate of convergence is a monotone increasing function of the swap rate. This motivates the study of the limit process as the swap rate goes to infinity. We construct a scheme which is equivalent to this limit in a distributional sense, but which involves no swapping at all. Instead, the effect of the swapping is captured by a collection of weights that influence both the dynamics and the empirical measure. While theoretically optimal, this limit is not computationally feasible when the number of temperatures is large, and so variations that are easy to implement and nearly optimal are also developed.
  • We construct importance sampling schemes for stochastic differential equations with small noise and fast oscillating coefficients. Standard Monte Carlo methods perform poorly for these problems in the small noise limit. With multiscale processes there are additional complications, and indeed the straightforward adaptation of methods for standard small noise diffusions will not produce efficient schemes. Using the subsolution approach we construct schemes and identify conditions under which the schemes will be asymptotically optimal. Examples and simulation results are provided.
  • We describe a new approach to the rare-event Monte Carlo sampling problem. This technique utilizes a symmetrization strategy to create probability distributions that are more highly connected and thus more easily sampled than their original, potentially sparse counterparts. After discussing the formal outline of the approach and devising techniques for its practical implementation, we illustrate the utility of the technique with a series of numerical applications to Lennard-Jones clusters of varying complexity and rare-event character.
  • We apply the splitting method to three well-known counting problems, namely 3-SAT, random graphs with prescribed degrees, and binary contingency tables. We present an enhanced version of the splitting method based on the capture-recapture technique, and show by experiments the superiority of this technique for SAT problems in terms of variance of the associated estimators, and speed of the algorithms.
  • Much of uncertainty quantification to date has focused on determining the effect of variables modeled probabilistically, and with a known distribution, on some physical or engineering system. We develop methods to obtain information on the system when the distributions of some variables are known exactly, others are known only approximately, and perhaps others are not modeled as random variables at all. The main tool used is the duality between risk-sensitive integrals and relative entropy, and we obtain explicit bounds on standard performance measures (variances, exceedance probabilities) over families of distributions whose distance from a nominal distribution is measured by relative entropy. The evaluation of the risk-sensitive expectations is based on polynomial chaos expansions, which help keep the computational aspects tractable.
  • We study the large deviations principle for locally periodic stochastic differential equations with small noise and fast oscillating coefficients. There are three possible regimes depending on how fast the intensity of the noise goes to zero relative to the homogenization parameter. We use weak convergence methods which provide convenient representations for the action functional for all three regimes. Along the way we study weak limits of related controlled SDEs with fast oscillating coefficients and derive, in some cases, a control that nearly achieves the large deviations lower bound at the prelimit level. This control is useful for designing efficient importance sampling schemes for multiscale diffusions driven by small noise.
  • A large deviation principle is established for a general class of stochastic flows in the small noise limit. This result is then applied to a Bayesian formulation of an image matching problem, and an approximate maximum likelihood property is shown for the solution of an optimization problem involving the large deviations rate function.