• We present multiple spectropolarimetric observations of the nearby Type Ia supernova (SN) 2011fe in M101, obtained before, during, and after the time of maximum apparent visual brightness. The excellent time coverage of our spectropolarimetry has allowed better monitoring of the evolution of polarization features than is typical, which has allowed us new insight into the nature of normal SNe Ia. SN 2011fe exhibits time-dependent polarization in both the continuum and strong absorption lines. At early epochs, red wavelengths exhibit a degree of continuum polarization of up to 0.4\%, likely indicative of a mild asymmetry in the electron-scattering photosphere. This behavior is more common in sub-luminous SNe Ia than in normal events, such as SN2011fe. The degree of polarization across a collection of absorption lines varies dramatically from epoch to epoch. During the earliest epoch a $\lambda$4600-5000 \AA\ complex of absorption lines shows enhanced polarization at a different position angle than the continuum. We explore the origin of these features, presenting a few possible interpretations, without arriving at a single favored ion. During two epochs near maximum, the dominant polarization feature is associated with the Si{\sc ii} $\lambda$6355 \AA\ absorption line. This is common for SNeIa, but for SN2011fe the polarization of this feature increases after maximum light, whereas for other SNeIa, that polarization feature was strongest before maximum light.
  • We perform a multi-wavelength polarimetric study of the quasar CTA 102 during an extraordinarily bright $\gamma$-ray outburst detected by the {\it Fermi} Large Area Telescope in September-October 2012 when the source reached a flux of F$_{>100~\mathrm{MeV}} =5.2\pm0.4\times10^{-6}$ photons cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. At the same time the source displayed an unprecedented optical and NIR outburst. We study the evolution of the parsec scale jet with ultra-high angular resolution through a sequence of 80 total and polarized intensity Very Long Baseline Array images at 43 GHz, covering the observing period from June 2007 to June 2014. We find that the $\gamma$-ray outburst is coincident with flares at all the other frequencies and is related to the passage of a new superluminal knot through the radio core. The powerful $\gamma$-ray emission is associated with a change in direction of the jet, which became oriented more closely to our line of sight ($\theta\sim$1.2$^{\circ}$) during the ejection of the knot and the $\gamma$-ray outburst. During the flare, the optical polarized emission displays intra-day variability and a clear clockwise rotation of EVPAs, which we associate with the path followed by the knot as it moves along helical magnetic field lines, although a random walk of the EVPA caused by a turbulent magnetic field cannot be ruled out. We locate the $\gamma$-ray outburst a short distance downstream of the radio core, parsecs from the black hole. This suggests that synchrotron self-Compton scattering of near-infrared to ultraviolet photons is the probable mechanism for the $\gamma$-ray production.
  • We present seven epochs of spectropolarimetry of the Type IIb supernova (SN) 2011dh in M51, spanning 86 days of its evolution. The first epoch was obtained 9 days after the explosion, when the photosphere was still in the depleted hydrogen layer of the stripped-envelope progenitor. Continuum polarization is securely detected at the level of P~0.5% through day 14 and appears to diminish by day 30, which is different from the prevailing trends suggested by studies of other core-collapse SNe. Time-variable modulations in P and position angle are detected across P-Cygni line features. H-alpha and HeI polarization peak after 30 days and exhibit position angles roughly aligned with the earlier continuum, while OI and CaII appear to be geometrically distinct. We discuss several possibilities to explain the evolution of the continuum and line polarization, including the potential effects of a tidally deformed progenitor star, aspherical radioactive heating by fast-rising plumes of Ni-56 from the core, oblique shock breakout, or scattering by circumstellar material. While these possibilities are plausible and guided by theoretical expectations, they are not unique solutions to the data. The construction of more detailed hydrodynamic and radiative-transfer models that incorporate complex aspherical geometries will be required to further elucidate the nature of the polarized radiation from SN 2011dh and other Type IIb supernovae.
  • We present our first results from a high-contrast imaging search for planetary mass companions around stars with gapped debris disks, as inferred from the stars' bright infrared excesses. For the six considered stars, we model the disks' unresolved infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in order to derive the temperature and location of the disk components. With VLT/NaCo Apodizing Phase Plate coronagraphic L'-band imaging, we search for planetary mass companions that may be sculpting the disks. We detect neither disks nor companions in this sample, confirmed by comparing plausible point sources with archival data. In order to calculate our mass sensitivity limit, we revisit the stellar age estimates. One target, HD 17848, at 540$\pm$100 Myr old is significantly older than previously estimated. We then discuss our high-contrast imaging results with respect to the disk properties.
  • We present spectropolarimetry of SN 2009ip throughout the evolution of its 2012 explosion. During the initial 2012a phase, when the source spectrum exhibits broad P-Cygni lines, we measure a V-band polarization of P~0.9% at a position angle of ~166 deg, indicating substantial asphericity for the 2012a outflow. Near the subsequent peak of the 2012b phase, when the spectrum shows signs of intense interaction with circumstellar material (CSM), we measure P~1.7% at a position angle of 72 deg, indicating a separate physical component of polarization, which has a higher degree of asphericity than the 2012a outflow and an orthogonal axis of symmetry on the sky. Around 30 days past peak, which is coincident with a bump in the declining light curve, we measure P~0.7% and significant variations in P across some broad lines, particularly HeI/NaI. By 60 days past peak the source appears to be approaching a low value of interstellar polarization (P<0.2%). The results are consistent with a scenario in which a potentially bipolar explosion during 2012a impacts a toroidal distribution of CSM, thereby causing the 2012b brightening. Orthogonality between the 2012a and 2012b geometries is inconsistent with the hypothesis that the 2012a event launched the CSM that was hit 40 days later by material from the 2012b event. Rather, the aspherical CSM probably has a separate origin associated with the outbursts of the stellar progenitor during prior years. Previous calculations that assumed spherical symmetry for the CSM have underestimated the required explosion energy, as the results suggest that <10% of the fast SN ejecta participated in strong CSM interaction during the 2012b phase. In light of the spectropolarimetric results, a kinetic energy of 1e51 erg for the ejecta is difficult to avoid, supporting the interpretation that the 2012 outburst was the result of a core-collapse supernova explosion (abridged)
  • [abridged] We present resolved images of the HR 4796A debris disk using the Magellan adaptive optics system paired with Clio-2 and VisAO. We detect the disk at 0.77 \microns, 0.91 \microns, 0.99 \microns, 2.15 \microns, 3.1 \microns, 3.3 \microns, and 3.8 \microns. We find that the deprojected center of the ring is offset from the star by 4.76$\pm$1.6 AU and that the deprojected eccentricity is 0.06$\pm$0.02, in general agreement with previous studies. We find that the average width of the ring is 14$^{+3}_{-2}%$, also comparable to previous measurements. Such a narrow ring precludes the existence of shepherding planets more massive than \about 4 \mj, comparable to hot-start planets we could have detected beyond \about 60 AU in projected separation. Combining our new scattered light data with archival HST/STIS and HST/NICMOS data at \about 0.5-2 \microns, along with previously unpublished Spitzer/MIPS thermal emission data and all other literature thermal data, we set out to constrain the chemical composition of the dust grains. After testing 19 individual root compositions and more than 8,400 unique mixtures of these compositions, we find that good fits to the scattered light alone and thermal emission alone are discrepant, suggesting that caution should be exercised if fitting to only one or the other. When we fit to both the scattered light and thermal emission simultaneously, we find mediocre fits (reduced chi-square \about 2). In general, however, we find that silicates and organics are the most favored, and that water ice is usually not favored. These results suggest that the common constituents of both interstellar dust and solar system comets also may reside around HR 4796A, though improved modeling is necessary to place better constraints on the exact chemical composition of the dust.
  • We present $\gamma$-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared light curves of 33 $\gamma$-ray bright blazars over four years that we have been monitoring since 2008 August with multiple optical, ground-based telescopes and the Swift satellite, and augmented by data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and other publicly available data from Swift. The sample consists of 21 flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) and 12 BL Lac objects (BL Lacs). We identify quiescent and active states of the sources based on their $\gamma$-ray behavior. We derive $\gamma$-ray, X-ray, and optical spectral indices, $\alpha_\gamma$, $\alpha_X$, and $\alpha_o$, respectively ($F_\nu\propto\nu^\alpha$), and construct spectral energy distributions (SEDs) during quiescent and active states. We analyze the relationships between different spectral indices, blazar classes, and activity states. We find (i) significantly steeper $\gamma$-ray spectra of FSRQs than for BL Lacs during quiescent states, but a flattening of the spectra for FSRQs during active states while the BL Lacs show no significant change; (ii) a small difference of $\alpha_X$ within each class between states, with BL Lac X-ray spectra significantly steeper than in FSRQs; (iii) a highly peaked distribution of X-ray spectral slopes of FSRQs at $\sim-$0.60, but a very broad distribution of $\alpha_X$ of BL Lacs during active states; (iv) flattening of the optical spectra of FSRQs during quiescent states, but no statistically significant change of $\alpha_o$ of BL Lacs between states; and (v) a positive correlation between optical and $\gamma$-ray spectral slopes of BL Lacs, with similar values of the slopes. We discuss the findings with respect to the relative prominence of different components of high-energy and optical emission as the flux state changes.
  • At low redshifts, dust-obscured quasars often have strong yet narrow permitted lines in the rest-frame optical and ultraviolet, excited by the central active nucleus, earning the designation Type II quasars. We present a sample of 145 candidate Type II quasars at redshifts between 2 and 4.3, encompassing the epoch at which quasar activity peaked in the universe. These objects, selected from the quasar sample of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III, are characterized by weak continuum in the rest-frame ultraviolet (typical continuum magnitude of i \approx 22) and strong lines of CIV and Ly \alpha, with Full Width at Half Maximum less than 2000 kms-1. The continuum magnitudes correspond to an absolute magnitude of -23 or brighter at redshift 3, too bright to be due exclusively to the host galaxies of these objects. Roughly one third of the objects are detected in the shorter-wavelength bands of the WISE survey; the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of these objects appear to be intermediate between classic Type I and Type II quasars seen at lower redshift. Five objects are detected at rest frame 6\mu m by Spitzer, implying bolometric luminosities of several times 10^46 erg s-1. We have obtained polarization measurements for two objects; they are roughly 3% polarized. We suggest that these objects are luminous quasars, with modest dust extinction (A_V ~ 0.5 mag), whose ultraviolet continuum also includes a substantial scattering contribution. Alternatively, the line of sight to the central engines of these objects may be partially obscured by optically thick material.
  • We analyze the multifrequency behavior of the quasar 3C 454.3 during three prominent \gamma-ray outbursts: 2009 Autumn, 2010 Spring, and 2010 Autumn. The data reveal a repeating pattern, including a triple flare structure, in the properties of each \gamma-ray outburst, which implies similar mechanism(s) and location for all three events. The multi-frequency behavior indicates that the lower frequency events are co-spatial with the \gamma-ray outbursts, although the \gamma-ray emission varies on the shortest timescales. We determine that the variability from UV to IR wavelengths during an outburst results from a single synchrotron component whose properties do not change significantly over the different outbursts. Despite a general increase in the degree of optical linear polarization during an outburst, the polarization drops significantly at the peak of the \gamma-ray event, which suggests that both shocks and turbulent processes are involved. We detect two disturbances (knots) with superluminal apparent speeds in the parsec-scale jet associated with the outbursts in 2009 Autumn and 2010 Autumn. The kinematic properties of the knots can explain the difference in amplitudes of the \gamma-ray events, while their millimeter-wave polarization is related to the optical polarization during the outbursts. We interpret the multi-frequency behavior within models involving either a system of standing conical shocks or magnetic reconnection events located in the parsec-scale millimeter-wave core of the jet. We argue that \gamma-ray outbursts with variability timescales as short as ~ 3 hr can occur on parsec scales if flares take place in localized regions such as turbulent cells.
  • From optical spectroscopy of X-ray sources observed as part of ChaMP, we present redshifts and classifications for a total of 1569 Chandra sources from our targeted spectroscopic follow up using the FLWO, SAAO, WIYN, CTIO, KPNO, Magellan, MMT and Gemini telescopes, and from archival SDSS spectroscopy. We classify the optical counterparts as 50% BLAGN, 16% NELG, 14% ALG, and 20% stars. We detect QSOs out to z~5.5 and galaxies out to z~3. We have compiled extensive photometry from X-ray to radio bands. Together with our spectroscopic information, this enables us to derive detailed SEDs for our extragalactic sources. We fit a variety of templates to determine bolometric luminosities, and to constrain AGN and starburst components where both are present. While ~58% of X-ray Seyferts require a starburst event to fit observed photometry only 26% of the X-ray QSO population appear to have some kind of star formation contribution. This is significantly lower than for the Seyferts, especially if we take into account torus contamination at z>1 where the majority of our X-ray QSOs lie. In addition, we observe a rapid drop of the percentage of starburst contribution as X-ray luminosity increases. This is consistent with the quenching of star formation by powerful QSOs, as predicted by the merger model, or with a time lag between the peak of star formation and QSO activity. We have tested the hypothesis that there should be a strong connection between X-ray obscuration and star-formation but we do not find any association between X-ray column density and star formation rate both in the general population or the star-forming X-ray Seyferts. Our large compilation also allows us to report here the identification of 81 XBONG, 78 z>3 X-ray sources and 8 Type-2 QSO candidates. Also we have identified the highest redshift (z=5.4135) X-ray selected QSO with optical spectroscopy.
  • We present observations of a major outburst at centimeter, millimeter, optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray wavelengths of the BL Lacertae object AO 0235+164 in 2008. We analyze the timing of multi-waveband variations in the flux and linear polarization, as well as changes in Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) images at 7mm with ~0.15 milliarcsecond resolution. The association of the events at different wavebands is confirmed at high statistical significance by probability arguments and Monte-Carlo simulations. A series of sharp peaks in optical linear polarization, as well as a pronounced maximum in the 7mm polarization of a superluminal jet knot, indicate rapid fluctuations in the degree of ordering of the magnetic field. These results lead us to conclude that the outburst occurred in the jet both in the quasi-stationary core and in the superluminal knot, both at >12 parsecs downstream of the supermassive black hole. We interpret the outburst as a consequence of the propagation of a disturbance, elongated along the line of sight by light-travel time delays, that passes through a standing recollimation shock in the core and propagates down the jet to create the superluminal knot. The multi-wavelength light curves vary together on long time-scales (months/years), but the correspondence is poorer on shorter time-scales. This, as well as the variability of the polarization and the dual location of the outburst, agrees with the expectations of a multi-zone emission model in which turbulence plays a major role in modulating the synchrotron and inverse Compton fluxes.
  • SDSS J1356+1026 is a pair of interacting galaxies at redshift z=0.123 that hosts a luminous obscured quasar in its northern nucleus. Here we present two long-slit Magellan LDSS-3 spectra that reveal a pair of symmetric ~10 kpc-size outflows emerging from this nucleus, with observed expansion velocities of ~250 km/s in projection. We present a kinematic model of these outflows and argue that the deprojected physical velocities of expansion are likely ~1000 km/s and that the kinetic energy of the expanding shells is likely 10^44-10^45 erg/s, with an absolute minimum of >10^42 erg/s. Although a radio counterpart is detected at 1.4GHz, it is faint enough that the quasar is considered to be radio-quiet by all standard criteria, and there is no evidence of extended emission due to radio lobes, whether aged or continuously powered by an ongoing jet. We argue that the likely level of star formation is probably insufficient to power the observed energetic outflow and that SDSS J1356+1026 makes a strong case for radio-quiet quasar feedback. In further support of this hypothesis, polarimetric observations show that the direction of quasar illumination is coincident with the direction of the outflow.
  • We locate the gamma-ray and lower frequency emission in flares of the BL Lac object AO 0235+164 at >12pc in the jet of the source from the central engine. We employ time-dependent multi-spectral-range flux and linear polarization monitoring observations, as well as ultra-high resolution (~0.15 milliarcsecond) imaging of the jet structure at lambda=7mm. The time coincidence in the end of 2008 of the propagation of the brightest superluminal feature detected in AO 0235+164 (Qs) with an extreme multi-spectral-range (gamma-ray to radio) outburst, and an extremely high optical and 7mm (for Qs) polarization degree provides strong evidence supporting that all these events are related. This is confirmed at high significance by probability arguments and Monte-Carlo simulations. These simulations show the unambiguous correlation of the gamma-ray flaring state in the end of 2008 with those in the optical, millimeter, and radio regime, as well as the connection of a prominent X-ray flare in October 2008, and of a series of optical linear polarization peaks, with the set of events in the end of 2008. The observations are interpreted as the propagation of an extended moving perturbation through a re-collimation structure at the end of the jet's acceleration and collimation zone.
  • We present multiple spectropolarimetric observations of the nearby Type Ia supernova SN 2011fe in M101, obtained before, during, and after the time of maximum apparent visual brightness. SN 2011fe exhibits time-dependent polarization in both the continuum and strong absorption lines. At all epochs, red wavelengths exhibit a degree of continuum polarizaiton of 0.2-0.4 per cent, likely indicative of persistent asymmetry in the electron-scattering photosphere. However, the degree of polarization across the Si II 6355 absorption line varies dramatically from epoch to epoch. Before maximum, Si II 6355 shows enhanced polarization at the same position angle (PA) as the polarized continuum. During two epochs near maximum, however, Si II 6355 absorption has a lower degree of polarization, with a PA that is 90deg from the continuum. After maximum, the absorption feature has the same degree of polarization and PA as the adjacent continuum. Another absorption feature in the blue (either Si II 5051 or a blend with Fe II lines) shows qualitatively similar changes, although the changes are shifted in time to an earlier epoch. This behavior is similar to that seen in broad absorption-line quasars, where the polarization in absorption features has been interpreted as the line absorbing some of the unpolarized continuum flux. This behavior, along with the 90deg shifts of the polarization PA with time, imply a time-dependent large-scale asymmetry in the explosion.
  • We report on the location of the gamma-ray emission region in flares of the BL Lacertae object OJ287 at >14pc from the central supermassive black hole. We employ data from multi-spectral range (total flux and linear polarization) monitoring programs combined with sequences of ultra-high-resolution 7mm VLBA images. The correlation between the brightest gamma-ray and mm flares is found to be statistically significant. The two gamma-ray peaks, detected by Fermi-LAT, that we report here happened at the rising phase of two exceptionally bright mm flares accompanied by sharp linear polarization peaks. The VLBA images show that these mm flares in total flux and polarization degree occurred in a jet region at >14pc from the innermost jet region. The time coincidence of the brighter gamma-ray flare and its corresponding mm linear polarization peak evidences that both the gamma-ray and mm outbursts occur >14pc from the central black hole. We find two sharp optical flares occurring at the peak times of the two reported gamma-ray flares. This is interpreted as the gamma-ray flares being produced by synchrotron self-Compton scattering of optical photons from the flares triggered by the interaction of moving knots with a stationary conical shock in the jet.
  • We present observations of a major outburst at centimeter, millimeter, optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray wavelengths of the BL Lacertae object AO 0235+164. We analyze the timing of multi-waveband variations in the flux and linear polarization, as well as changes in Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) images at 7mm with 0.15 milliarcsecond resolution. The association of the events at different wavebands is confirmed at high statistical significance by probability arguments and Monte-Carlo simulations. A series of sharp peaks in optical linear polarization, as well as a pronounced maximum in the 7 mm polarization of a superluminal jet knot, indicate rapid fluctuations in the degree of ordering of the magnetic field. These results lead us to conclude that the outburst occurred in the jet both in the quasi-stationary "core" and in the superluminal knot, both parsecs downstream of the supermassive black hole. We interpret the outburst as a consequence of the propagation of a disturbance, elongated along the line of sight by light-travel time delays, that passes through a standing recollimation shock in the core and propagates down the jet to create the superluminal knot. The multi-wavelength light curves vary together on long time-scales (months/years), but the correspondence is poorer on shorter time-scales. This, as well as the variability of the polarization and the dual location of the outburst, agrees with the expectations of a multi-zone emission model in which turbulence plays a major role in modulating the synchrotron and inverse Compton fluxes.
  • We combine time-dependent multi-waveband flux and linear polarization observations with sub-milliarcsecond-scale polarimetric images at lambda=7mm of the BL Lacertae-type blazar OJ287 to locate the gamma-ray emission in prominent flares in the jet of the source >14pc from the central engine. We demonstrate a highly significant correlation between the strongest gamma-ray and millimeter-wave flares through Monte-Carlo simulations. The two reported gamma-ray peaks occurred near the beginning of two major mm-wave outbursts, each of which is associated with a linear polarization maximum at millimeter wavelengths. Our Very Long Baseline Array observations indicate that the two mm-wave flares originated in the second of two features in the jet that are separated by >14 pc. The simultaneity of the peak of the higher-amplitude gamma-ray flare and the maximum in polarization of the second jet feature implies that the gamma-ray and mm-wave flares are co-spatial and occur >14 pc from the central engine. We also associate two optical flares, accompanied by sharp polarization peaks, with the two gamma-ray events. The multi-waveband behavior is most easily explained if the gamma-rays arise from synchrotron self-Compton scattering of optical photons from the flares. We propose that flares are triggered by interaction of moving plasma blobs with a standing shock. The gamma-ray and optical emission is quenched by inverse Compton losses as synchrotron photons from the newly shocked plasma cross the emission region. The mm-wave polarization is high at the onset of a flare, but decreases as the electrons emitting at these wavelengths penetrate less polarized regions.
  • We analyze the behavior of the parsec-scale jet of the quasar 3C~454.3 during pronounced flaring activity in 2005-2008. Three major disturbances propagated down the jet along different trajectories with Lorentz factors $\Gamma>$10. The disturbances show a clear connection with millimeter-wave outbursts, in 2005 May/June, 2007 July, and 2007 December. High-amplitude optical events in the $R$-band light curve precede peaks of the millimeter-wave outbursts by 15-50 days. Each optical outburst is accompanied by an increase in X-ray activity. We associate the optical outbursts with propagation of the superluminal knots and derive the location of sites of energy dissipation in the form of radiation. The most prominent and long-lasting of these, in 2005 May, occurred closer to the black hole, while the outbursts with a shorter duration in 2005 Autumn and in 2007 might be connected with the passage of a disturbance through the millimeter-wave core of the jet. The optical outbursts, which coincide with the passage of superluminal radio knots through the core, are accompanied by systematic rotation of the position angle of optical linear polarization. Such rotation appears to be a common feature during the early stages of flares in blazars. We find correlations between optical variations and those at X-ray and $\gamma$-ray energies. We conclude that the emergence of a superluminal knot from the core yields a series of optical and high-energy outbursts, and that the mm-wave core lies at the end of the jet's acceleration and collimation zone.
  • As part of our comprehensive long-term multi-waveband monitoring of 34 blazars, we followed the activity in the jet of the blazar PKS 1510-089 during major outbursts during the first half of 2009. The most revealing event was a two-month long outburst that featured a number of gamma-ray flares. During the outburst, the position angle of optical linear polarization rotated by about 720 degrees, which implies that a single emission feature was responsible for all of the flares during the outburst. At the end of the rotation, a new superluminal knot (~ 22c) passed through the "core" seen on 43 GHz VLBA images at essentially the same time as an extremely sharp, high-amplitude gamma-ray and optical flare occurred. We associate the entire multi-flare outburst with this knot. The ratio of gamma-ray to synchrotron integrated flux indicates that some of the gamma-ray flares resulted from inverse Compton scattering of seed photons outside the ultra-fast spine of the jet. Because many of the flares occurred over time scales of days or even hours, there must be a number of sources of IR-optical-UV seed photons -- probably synchrotron emission -- surrounding the spine, perhaps in a slower sheath of the jet.
  • We present results from monitoring the multi-waveband flux, linear polarization, and parsec-scale structure of the quasar PKS 1510-089, concentrating on eight major gamma-ray flares that occurred during the interval 2009.0-2009.5. The gamma-ray peaks were essentially simultaneous with maxima at optical wavelengths, although the flux ratio of the two wavebands varied by an order of magnitude. The optical polarization vector rotated by 720 degrees during a 5-day period encompassing six of these flares. This culminated in a very bright, roughly 1 day, optical and gamma-ray flare as a bright knot of emission passed through the highest-intensity, stationary feature (the "core") seen in 43 GHz Very Long Baseline Array images. The knot continued to propagate down the jet at an apparent speed of 22c and emit strongly at gamma-ray energies as a months-long X-ray/radio outburst intensified. We interpret these events as the result of the knot following a spiral path through a mainly toroidal magnetic field pattern in the acceleration and collimation zone of the jet, after which it passes through a standing shock in the 43 GHz core and then continues downstream. In this picture, the rapid gamma-ray flares result from scattering of infrared seed photons from a relatively slow sheath of the jet as well as from optical synchrotron radiation in the faster spine. The 2006-2009.7 radio and X-ray flux variations are correlated at very high significance; we conclude that the X-rays are mainly from inverse Compton scattering of infrared seed photons by 20-40 MeV electrons.
  • We present multi-epoch Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the transitional disk LRLL 31 in the 2-3 Myr-old star forming region IC 348. Our measurements show remarkable mid-infrared variability on timescales as short as one week. The infrared continuum emission exhibits systematic wavelength-dependent changes that suggest corresponding dynamical changes in the inner disk structure and variable shadowing of outer disk material. We propose several possible sources for the structural changes, including a variable accretion rate or a stellar or planetary companion embedded in the disk. Our results indicate that variability studies in the infrared can provide important new constraints on protoplanetary disk behavior.
  • We have obtained a Gemini South T-ReCS Qa-band (18.3 micron) image and a Spitzer MIPS SED-mode observation of HD181327, an F5/F6V member of the ~12 Myr old beta Pictoris moving group. We resolve the disk in thermal-emission for the first time and find that the northern arm of the disk is 1.4x brighter than the southern arm. In addition, we detect a broad peak in the combined Spitzer IRS and MIPS spectra at 60 - 75 micron that may be produced by emission from crystalline water ice. We model the IRS and MIPS data using a size distribution of amorphous olivine and water ice grains (dn/da proportional to a^{-2.25} with a_{min} consistent with the minimum blow out size and a_{max} = 20 micron) located at a distance of 86.3 AU from the central star, as observed in previously published scattered-light images. Since the photo-desorption lifetime for the icy particles is ~1400 yr, significantly less than the estimated ~12 Myr age of the system, we hypothesize that we have detected debris that may be steadily replenished by collisions among icy Kuiper belt object-like parent bodies in a newly forming planetary system.
  • We describe observations of aromatic features at 7.7 and 11.3 um in AGN of three types including PG, 2MASS and 3CR objects. The feature has been demonstrated to originate predominantly from star formation. Based on the aromatic-derived star forming luminosity, we find that the far-IR emission of AGN can be dominated by either star formation or nuclear emission; the average contribution from star formation is around 25% at 70 and 160 um. The star-forming infrared luminosity functions of the three types of AGN are flatter than that of field galaxies, implying nuclear activity and star formation tend to be enhanced together. The star-forming luminosity function is also a function of the strength of nuclear activity from normal galaxies to the bright quasars, with luminosity functions becoming flatter for more intense nuclear activity. Different types of AGN show different distributions in the level of star formation activity, with 2MASS> PG> 3CR star formation rates.
  • We report on multi-frequency linear polarization monitoring of 15 active galactic nuclei containing highly relativistic jets with apparent speeds from $\sim$4 $c$ to $>40c$. The measurements were obtained at optical, 1 mm, and 3 mm wavelengths, and at 7 mm with the Very Long Baseline Array. The data show a wide range in degree of linear polarization among the sources, from $<$1% to $>$30%, and interday polarization variability in individual sources. The polarization properties suggest separation of the sample into three groups with low, intermediate, and high variability of polarization in the core at 7 mm : LVP, IVP, and HVP, respectively. The groups are partially associated with the common classification of active galactic nuclei as radio galaxies and quasars with low optical polarization (LVP), BL Lacertae objects (IVP), and highly optically polarized quasars (HVP). Our study investigates correlations between total flux, fractional polarization, and polarization position angle at the different wavelengths. We interpret the polarization properties of the sources in the sample through models in which weak shocks compress turbulent plasma in the jet. The differences in the orientation of sources with respect to the observer, jet kinematics, and abundance of thermal matter external to the jet near the core can account for the diversity in the polarization properties. The results provide strong evidence that the optical polarized emission originates in shocks, most likely situated between the 3 mm and 7 mm VLBI cores. They also support the idea that the 1 mm core lies at the edge of the transition zone between electromagnetically dominated and turbulent hydrodynamical sections of the jet.
  • Observations of candidate BL Lacertae objects spectroscopically selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) reveal a large fraction with high polarization (P > 3%). This result confirms that synchrotron radiation makes an important contribution to the observed optical continuum for most objects in the sample. The SDSS sample can be divided into separate categories, with objects of undetermined redshift generally having the highest optical polarization. Polarization as high as 23% and the lack of spectral features suggests that the synchrotron continuum completely dominates the spectra of these sources. The mean polarization levels observed for objects having measured redshifts is much lower, with the maximum observed polarization for this group being ~10%. The lower polarizations of these objects are reminiscent of the less spectacular polarization levels shown by BL Lac objects discovered in X-ray surveys. We find no SDSS BL Lac candidates at z > 1 with P > 3%, calling their classification as BL Lac objects into question. In addition, the existence of radio-quiet BL Lac objects is not verified since none of 10 potentially radio-weak BL Lac candidates observed are highly polarized. Regardless of whether the high-redshift and radio-weak objects are included in this optical sample, the overall levels of polarization observed are intermediate between those seen for X-ray and radio-selected BL Lac objects.