• We construct a complexity-based morphospace to study systems-level properties of conscious & intelligent systems. The axes of this space label 3 complexity types: autonomous, cognitive & social. Given recent proposals to synthesize consciousness, a generic complexity-based conceptualization provides a useful framework for identifying defining features of conscious & synthetic systems. Based on current clinical scales of consciousness that measure cognitive awareness and wakefulness, we take a perspective on how contemporary artificially intelligent machines & synthetically engineered life forms measure on these scales. It turns out that awareness & wakefulness can be associated to computational & autonomous complexity respectively. Subsequently, building on insights from cognitive robotics, we examine the function that consciousness serves, & argue the role of consciousness as an evolutionary game-theoretic strategy. This makes the case for a third type of complexity for describing consciousness: social complexity. Having identified these complexity types, allows for a representation of both, biological & synthetic systems in a common morphospace. A consequence of this classification is a taxonomy of possible conscious machines. We identify four types of consciousness, based on embodiment: (i) biological consciousness, (ii) synthetic consciousness, (iii) group consciousness (resulting from group interactions), & (iv) simulated consciousness (embodied by virtual agents within a simulated reality). This taxonomy helps in the investigation of comparative signatures of consciousness across domains, in order to highlight design principles necessary to engineer conscious machines. This is particularly relevant in the light of recent developments at the crossroads of cognitive neuroscience, biomedical engineering, artificial intelligence & biomimetics.
  • In order to understand the formation of social conventions we need to know the specific role of control and learning in multi-agent systems. To advance in this direction, we propose, within the framework of the Distributed Adaptive Control (DAC) theory, a novel Control-based Reinforcement Learning architecture (CRL) that can account for the acquisition of social conventions in multi-agent populations that are solving a benchmark social decision-making problem. Our new CRL architecture, as a concrete realization of DAC multi-agent theory, implements a low-level sensorimotor control loop handling the agent's reactive behaviors (pre-wired reflexes), along with a layer based on model-free reinforcement learning that maximizes long-term reward. We apply CRL in a multi-agent game-theoretic task in which coordination must be achieved in order to find an optimal solution. We show that our CRL architecture is able to both find optimal solutions in discrete and continuous time and reproduce human experimental data on standard game-theoretic metrics such as efficiency in acquiring rewards, fairness in reward distribution and stability of convention formation.
  • The quest for a scientific description of consciousness has given rise to new theoretical and empirical paradigms for the investigation of phenomenological contents as well as clinical disorders of consciousness. An outstanding challenge in the field is to develop measures that uniquely quantify global brain states tied to consciousness. In particular, information-theoretic complexity measures such as integrated information have recently been proposed as measures of conscious awareness. This suggests a new framework to quantitatively classify states of consciousness. However, it has proven increasingly difficult to apply these complexity measures to realistic brain networks. In part, this is due to high computational costs incurred when implementing these measures on realistically large network dimensions. Nonetheless, complexity measures for quantifying states of consciousness are important for assisting clinical diagnosis and therapy. This article is meant to serve as a lookup table of measures of consciousness, with particular emphasis on clinical applicability of these measures. We consider both, principle-based complexity measures as well as empirical measures tested on patients. We address challenges facing these measures with regard to realistic brain networks, and where necessary, suggest possible resolutions.
  • How does our nervous system successfully acquire feedback control strategies in spite of a wide spectrum of response dynamics from different musculo-skeletal systems? The cerebellum is a crucial brain structure in enabling precise motor control in animals. Recent advances suggest that synaptic plasticity of cerebellar Purkinje cells involves molecular mechanisms that mimic the dynamics of the efferent motor system that they control allowing them to match the timing of their learning rule to behavior. Counter-Factual Predictive Control (CFPC) is a cerebellum-based feed-forward control scheme that exploits that principle for acquiring anticipatory actions. CFPC extends the classical Widrow-Hoff/Least Mean Squares by inserting a forward model of the downstream closed-loop system in its learning rule. Here we apply that same insight to the problem of learning the gains of a feedback controller. To that end, we frame a Model-Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC) problem and derive an adaptive control scheme treating the gains of a feedback controller as if they were the weights of an adaptive linear unit. Our results demonstrate that rather than being exclusively confined to cerebellar learning, the approach of controlling plasticity with a forward model of the subsystem controlled, an approach that we term as Model-Enhanced Least Mean Squares (ME-LMS), can provide a solution to wide set of adaptive control problems.
  • We investigate scaling properties of human brain functional networks in the resting-state. Analyzing network degree distributions, we statistically test whether their tails scale as power-law or not. Initial studies, based on least-squares fitting, were shown to be inadequate for precise estimation of power-law distributions. Subsequently, methods based on maximum-likelihood estimators have been proposed and applied to address this question. Nevertheless, no clear consensus has emerged, mainly because results have shown substantial variability depending on the data-set used or its resolution. In this study, we work with high-resolution data (10K nodes) from the Human Connectome Project and take into account network weights. We test for the power-law, exponential, log-normal and generalized Pareto distributions. Our results show that the statistics generally do not support a power-law, but instead these degree distributions tend towards the thin-tail limit of the generalized Pareto model. This may have implications for the number of hubs in human brain functional networks.
  • How much information do large brain networks integrate as a whole over the sum of their parts? Can the dynamical complexity of such networks be globally quantified in an information-theoretic way and be meaningfully coupled to brain function? Recently, measures of dynamical complexity such as integrated information have been proposed. However, problems related to the normalization and Bell number of partitions associated to these measures make these approaches computationally infeasible for large-scale brain networks. Our goal in this work is to address this problem. Our formulation of network integrated information is based on the Kullback-Leibler divergence between the multivariate distribution on the set of network states versus the corresponding factorized distribution over its parts. We find that implementing the maximum information partition optimizes computations. These methods are well-suited for large networks with linear stochastic dynamics. We compute the integrated information for both, the system's attractor states, as well as non-stationary dynamical states of the network. We then apply this formalism to brain networks to compute the integrated information for the human brain's connectome. Compared to a randomly re-wired network, we find that the specific topology of the brain generates greater information complexity.