• We search for correlations between the [OI]6300 line, a well-known tracer of jets and winds in young stars, and stellar/disk/accretion properties in the young cluster NGC 2264, aiming to characterize the outflow phenomena that occur within the circumstellar environment. We analyzed FLAMES spectra of 184 stars, detecting the [OI]6300 line in 108 CTTSs and 2 Herbig AeBe stars. We identified the main features of this line: a high-velocity component (HVC), and a broad and narrow low-velocity components (BLVC and NLVC). We calculated their luminosities and kinematic properties, then compared with stellar/accretion parameters. The luminosity of the [OI]6300 line correlates positively with the stellar and accretion luminosity. The HVC is only detected among systems with optically thick inner disks; the BLVC is found in thick disk systems and few systems with anemic disks; and the NLVC is common among systems with all types of disks. Our BLVCs present blueshifts of up to 50km/s and widths compatible with an origin 0.05au-3au from the star. The NLVCs have centroid velocities and widths consistent with what may be expected for photoevaporative disk winds originating between 1 and 15au. The HVC is found most often among sources with irregular, aperiodic photometric variability, usually associated with accretion in an unstable regime. The mechanical luminosity transported by jets correlates positively with the accretion luminosity, but no stellar properties appear to significantly influence any property of these jets. We find jet velocities on average similar to those found in Taurus. We confirm earlier findings in Taurus which favor an inner MHD disk wind as the origin of the BLVC, while the NLVC might trace photoevaporative disk winds. The [OI]6300 line profile shows signs of evolving as the disk disperses, with the HVC and BLVC disappearing as the inner disk becomes optically thin.
  • Our goal is to relate the photometric and spectroscopic variability of classical T Tauri stars, of the star-forming cluster NGC 2264, to the physical processes acting in the stellar and circumstellar environment, within a few stellar radii from the star. NGC 2264 was the target of a multiwavelength observational campaign with CoRoT, MOST, Spitzer, and Chandra satellites and observations from the ground. We classified the CoRoT light curves of accreting systems according to their morphology and compared our classification to several accretion diagnostics and disk parameters. The morphology of the CoRoT light curve reflects the evolution of the accretion process and of the inner disk region. Accretion burst stars present high mass-accretion rates and optically thick inner disks. AA Tau-like systems, whose light curves are dominated by circumstellar dust obscuration, show intermediate mass-accretion rates and are located in the transition of thick to anemic disks. Classical T Tauri stars with spot-like light curves correspond mostly to systems with a low mass-accretion rate and low mid-IR excess. About 30% of the classical T Tauri stars observed in the 2008 and 2011 CoRoT runs changed their light-curve morphology. Transitions from AA Tau-like and spot-like to aperiodic light curves and vice versa were common. The analysis of the $H\alpha$ emission line variability of 58 accreting stars showed that 8 presented a periodicity that in a few cases was coincident with the photometric period. The blue and red wings of the $H\alpha$ line profiles often do not correlate with each other, indicating that they are strongly influenced by different physical processes. Accreting stars have a dynamic stellar and circumstellar environment that can be explained by magnetospheric accretion and outflow models, including variations from stable to unstable accretion regimes on timescales of a few years
  • We provide CoRoT and Spitzer light curves, as well as broad-band multi-wavelength photometry and high resolution, multi- and single-epoch spectroscopy for 17 classical T Tauris in NGC 2264 whose CoRoT light curves (LCs) exemplify the "stochastic" LC class as defined in Cody et al. (2014). The most probable physical mechanism to explain the optical variability in this LC class is time-dependent mass accretion onto the stellar photosphere, producing transient hot spots. As evidence in favor of this hypothesis, multi-epoch high resolution spectra for a subset of these stars shows that their veiling levels also vary in time and that this veiling variability is consistent in both amplitude and timescale with the optical LC morphology. Furthermore, the veiling variability is well-correlated with the strength of the HeI 6678A emission line, a feature predicted by models to arise in accretion shocks on or near the stellar photosphere. Stars with accretion burst LC morphology (Stauffer et al. 2014) are also attributed to variable mass accretion. Both the stochastic and accretion burst LCs can be explained by a simple model of randomly occurring flux bursts, with the stochastic LC class having a higher frequency of lower amplitude events. Based on their UV excesses, veiling, and mean Ha equivalent widths, members of the stochastic LC class have only moderate time-averaged mass accretion rates. The most common feature of their Ha profiles is for them to exhibit blue-shifted absorption features, most likely originating in a disk wind. The lack of periodic signatures in the LCs suggests that little of the variability is due to long-lived hot spots rotating into or out of our line of sight; instead, the primary driver of the observed photometric variability is likely to be instabilities in the inner disk that lead to variable mass accretion.
  • We identify nine young stellar objects (YSOs) in the NGC 2264 star-forming region with optical {\em CoRoT} light curves exhibiting short-duration, shallow, periodic flux dips. All of these stars have infrared (IR) excesses that are consistent with their having inner disk walls near the Keplerian co-rotation radius. The repeating photometric dips have FWHM generally less than one day, depths almost always less than 15%, and periods (3<P<11 days) consistent with dust near the Keplerian co-rotation period. The flux dips vary considerably in their depth from epoch to epoch, but usually persist for several weeks and, in two cases, were present in data collected on successive years. For several of these stars, we also measure the photospheric rotation period and find that the rotation and dip periods are the same, as predicted by standard "disk-locking" models. We attribute these flux dips to clumps of material in or near the inner disk wall, passing through our line of sight to the stellar photosphere. In some cases, these dips are also present in simultaneous {\em Spitzer} IRAC light curves at 3.6 and 4.5 microns. We characterize the properties of these dips, and compare the stars with light curves exhibiting this behavior to other classes of YSO in NGC 2264. A number of physical mechanisms could locally increase the dust scale height near the inner disk wall, and we discuss several of those mechanisms; the most plausible mechanisms are either a disk warp due to interaction with the stellar magnetic field or dust entrained in funnel-flow accretion columns arising near the inner disk wall.