• We report on the behaviour of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) developed for muon detection in ultra-high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) experiments. The RPCs were developed for the MARTA project and were tested on field conditions. These RPCs cover an area of $1.5 \times 1.2\,{m^2}$ and are instrumented with 64 pickup electrodes providing a segmentation better than $20\,$cm. By shielding the detector units with enough slant mass to absorb the electromagnetic component in the air showers, a clean measurement of the muon content is allowed, a concept to be implemented in a next generation of UHECR experiments. The operation of a ground array detector poses challenging demands, as the RPC must operate remotely under extreme environmental conditions, with limited budgets for power and minimal maintenance. The RPC, DAQ, High Voltage and monitoring systems are enclosed in an aluminium-sealed case, providing a compact and robust unit suited for outdoor environments, which can be easily deployed and connected. The RPCs developed at LIP-Coimbra are able to operate using a very low gas flux, which allows running them for few years with a small gas reservoir. Several prototypes have already been built and tested both in the laboratory and outdoors. We report on the most recent tests done in the field that show that the developed RPCs have operated in a stable way for more than 2 years in field conditions.
  • Single-bed whole-body positron emission tomography based on resistive plate chamber detectors (RPC-PET) has been proposed for human studies, as a complementary resource to scintillator-based PET scanners. The purpose of this work is mainly about providing a reconstruction solution to such whole-body single-bed data collection on an event-by-event basis. We demonstrate a fully three-dimensional time-of-flight (TOF)-based reconstruction algorithm that is capable of processing the highly inclined lines of response acquired from a system with a very large axial field of view, such as those used in RPC-PET. Such algorithm must be sufficiently fast that it will not compromise the clinical workflow of an RPC-PET system. We present simulation results from a voxelized version of the anthropomorphic NCAT phantom, with oncological lesions introduced into critical regions within the human body. The list-mode data was reconstructed with a TOF-weighted maximum-likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM). To accelerate the reconstruction time of the algorithm, a multi-threaded approach supported by graphical processing units (GPUs) was developed. Additionally, a TOF-assisted data division method is suggested that allows the data from nine body regions to be reconstructed independently and much more rapidly. The application of a TOF-based scatter rejection method reduces the overall body scatter from 57.1% to 32.9%. The results also show that a 300-ps FWHM RPC-PET scanner allows for the production of a reconstructed image in 3.5 minutes following a 7-minute acquisition upon the injection of 2 mCi of activity (146 M coincidence events). We present for the first time a full realistic reconstruction of a whole body, long axial coverage, RPC-PET scanner. We demonstrate clinically relevant reconstruction times comparable (or lower) to the patient acquisition times on both multi-threaded CPU and GPU.