• Approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) is a method for Bayesian inference when the likelihood is unavailable but simulating from the model is possible. However, many ABC algorithms require a large number of simulations, which can be costly. To reduce the computational cost, Bayesian optimisation (BO) and surrogate models such as Gaussian processes have been proposed. Bayesian optimisation enables one to intelligently decide where to evaluate the model next but common BO strategies are not designed for the goal of estimating the posterior distribution. Our paper addresses this gap in the literature. We propose to compute the uncertainty in the ABC posterior density, which is due to a lack of simulations to estimate this quantity accurately, and define a loss function that measures this uncertainty. We then propose to select the next evaluation location to minimise the expected loss. Experiments show that the proposed method often produces the most accurate approximations as compared to common BO strategies.
  • Engine for Likelihood-Free Inference (ELFI) is a Python software library for performing likelihood-free inference (LFI). ELFI provides a convenient syntax for arranging components in LFI, such as priors, simulators, summaries or distances, to a network called ELFI graph. The components can be implemented in a wide variety of languages. The stand-alone ELFI graph can be used with any of the available inference methods without modifications. A central method implemented in ELFI is Bayesian Optimization for Likelihood-Free Inference (BOLFI), which has recently been shown to accelerate likelihood-free inference up to several orders of magnitude by surrogate-modelling the distance. ELFI also has an inbuilt support for output data storing for reuse and analysis, and supports parallelization of computation from multiple cores up to a cluster environment. ELFI is designed to be extensible and provides interfaces for widening its functionality. This makes the adding of new inference methods to ELFI straightforward and automatically compatible with the inbuilt features.
  • Approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) can be used for model fitting when the likelihood function is intractable but simulating from the model is feasible. However, even a single evaluation of a complex model may take several hours, limiting the number of model evaluations available. Modelling the discrepancy between the simulated and observed data using a Gaussian process (GP) can be used to reduce the number of model evaluations required by ABC, but the sensitivity of this approach to a specific GP formulation has not yet been thoroughly investigated. We begin with a comprehensive empirical evaluation of using GPs in ABC, including various transformations of the discrepancies and two novel GP formulations. Our results indicate the choice of GP may significantly affect the accuracy of the estimated posterior distribution. Selection of an appropriate GP model is thus important. We formulate expected utility to measure the accuracy of classifying discrepancies below or above the ABC threshold, and show that it can be used to automate the GP model selection step. Finally, based on the understanding gained with toy examples, we fit a population genetic model for bacteria, providing insight into horizontal gene transfer events within the population and from external origins.
  • Predicting the efficacy of a drug for a given individual, using high-dimensional genomic measurements, is at the core of precision medicine. However, identifying features on which to base the predictions remains a challenge, especially when the sample size is small. Incorporating expert knowledge offers a promising alternative to improve a prediction model, but collecting such knowledge is laborious to the expert if the number of candidate features is very large. We introduce a probabilistic model that can incorporate expert feedback about the impact of genomic measurements on the sensitivity of a cancer cell for a given drug. We also present two methods to intelligently collect this feedback from the expert, using experimental design and multi-armed bandit models. In a multiple myeloma blood cancer data set (n=51), expert knowledge decreased the prediction error by 8%. Furthermore, the intelligent approaches can be used to reduce the workload of feedback collection to less than 30% on average compared to a naive approach.
  • Providing accurate predictions is challenging for machine learning algorithms when the number of features is larger than the number of samples in the data. Prior knowledge can improve machine learning models by indicating relevant variables and parameter values. Yet, this prior knowledge is often tacit and only available from domain experts. We present a novel approach that uses interactive visualization to elicit the tacit prior knowledge and uses it to improve the accuracy of prediction models. The main component of our approach is a user model that models the domain expert's knowledge of the relevance of different features for a prediction task. In particular, based on the expert's earlier input, the user model guides the selection of the features on which to elicit user's knowledge next. The results of a controlled user study show that the user model significantly improves prior knowledge elicitation and prediction accuracy, when predicting the relative citation counts of scientific documents in a specific domain.
  • In high-dimensional data, structured noise caused by observed and unobserved factors affecting multiple target variables simultaneously, imposes a serious challenge for modeling, by masking the often weak signal. Therefore, (1) explaining away the structured noise in multiple-output regression is of paramount importance. Additionally, (2) assumptions about the correlation structure of the regression weights are needed. We note that both can be formulated in a natural way in a latent variable model, in which both the interesting signal and the noise are mediated through the same latent factors. Under this assumption, the signal model then borrows strength from the noise model by encouraging similar effects on correlated targets. We introduce a hyperparameter for the \emph{latent signal-to-noise ratio} which turns out to be important for modelling weak signals, and an ordered infinite-dimensional shrinkage prior that resolves the rotational unidentifiability in reduced-rank regression models. Simulations and prediction experiments with metabolite, gene expression, FMRI measurement, and macroeconomic time series data show that our model equals or exceeds the state-of-the-art performance and, in particular, outperforms the standard approach of assuming independent noise and signal models.
  • We consider the prediction of weak effects in a multiple-output regression setup, when covariates are expected to explain a small amount, less than $\approx 1%$, of the variance of the target variables. To facilitate the prediction of the weak effects, we constrain our model structure by introducing a novel Bayesian approach of sharing information between the regression model and the noise model. Further reduction of the effective number of parameters is achieved by introducing an infinite shrinkage prior and group sparsity in the context of the Bayesian reduced rank regression, and using the Bayesian infinite factor model as a flexible low-rank noise model. In our experiments the model incorporating the novelties outperformed alternatives in genomic prediction of rich phenotype data. In particular, the information sharing between the noise and regression models led to significant improvement in prediction accuracy.
  • High-dimensional phenotypes hold promise for richer findings in association studies, but testing of several phenotype traits aggravates the grand challenge of association studies, that of multiple testing. Several methods have recently been proposed for testing jointly all traits in a high-dimensional vector of phenotypes, with prospect of increased power to detect small effects that would be missed if tested individually. However, the methods have rarely been compared to the extent of enabling assessment of their relative merits and setting up guidelines on which method to use, and how to use it. We compare the methods on simulated data and with a real metabolomics data set comprising 137 highly correlated variables and approximately 550,000 SNPs. Applying the methods to genome-wide data with hundreds of thousands of markers inevitably requires division of the problem into manageable parts facilitating parallel processing, parts corresponding to individual genetic variants, pathways, or genes, for example. Here we utilize a straightforward formulation according to which the genome is divided into blocks of nearby correlated genetic markers, tested jointly for association with the phenotypes. This formulation is computationally feasible, reduces the number of tests, and lets the methods take advantage of combining information over several correlated variables not only on the phenotype side, but also on the genotype side. Our experiments show that canonical correlation analysis has higher power than alternative methods, while remaining computationally tractable for routine use in the GWAS setting, provided the number of samples is sufficient compared to the numbers of phenotype and genotype variables tested. Sparse canonical correlation analysis and regression models with latent confounding factors show promising performance when the number of samples is small.