• We present a comparison of nine galaxy formation models, eight semi-analytical and one halo occupation distribution model, run on the same underlying cold dark matter simulation (cosmological box of co-moving width 125$h^{-1}$ Mpc, with a dark-matter particle mass of $1.24\times 10^9 h^{-1}$ Msun) and the same merger trees. While their free parameters have been calibrated to the same observational data sets using two approaches, they nevertheless retain some 'memory' of any previous calibration that served as the starting point (especially for the manually-tuned models). For the first calibration, models reproduce the observed z = 0 galaxy stellar mass function (SMF) within 3-{\sigma}. The second calibration extended the observational data to include the z = 2 SMF alongside the z~0 star formation rate function, cold gas mass and the black hole-bulge mass relation. Encapsulating the observed evolution of the SMF from z = 2 to z = 0 is found to be very hard within the context of the physics currently included in the models. We finally use our calibrated models to study the evolution of the stellar-to-halo mass (SHM) ratio. For all models we find that the peak value of the SHM relation decreases with redshift. However, the trends seen for the evolution of the peak position as well as the mean scatter in the SHM relation are rather weak and strongly model dependent. Both the calibration data sets and model results are publicly available.
  • We study the characteristics of galaxy protoclusters using the latest L-galaxies semi-analytic model. Searching for protoclusters on a scale of $\sim 10 \, \mathrm{cMpc}$ gives an excellent compromise between the completeness and purity of their galaxy populations, leads to high distinction from the field in overdensity space, and allows accurate determination of the descendant cluster mass. This scale is valid over a range of redshifts and selection criteria. We present a procedure for estimating, given a measured galaxy overdensity, the protocluster probability and its descendant cluster mass for a range of modelling assumptions, particularly taking into account the shape of the measurement aperture. This procedure produces lower protocluster probabilities compared to previous estimates using fixed size apertures. The relationship between AGN and protoclusters is also investigated, and shows significant evolution with redshift; at $z \sim 2$ the fraction of protoclusters traced by AGN is high, but the fraction of all AGN in protoclusters is low, whereas at $z \geqslant 5$ the fraction of protoclusters containing AGN is low, but most AGN are in protoclusters. We also find indirect evidence for the emergence of a passive sequence in protoclusters at $z \sim 2$, and note that a significant fraction of all galaxies reside in protoclusters at $z \geqslant 2$, particularly the most massive.
  • We introduce the Cluster-EAGLE (C-EAGLE) simulation project, a set of cosmological hydrodynamical zoom simulations of the formation of $30$ galaxy clusters in the mass range $10^{14}<M_{200}/\mathrm{M}_{\odot}<10^{15.4}$ that incorporates the Hydrangea sample of Bah\'e et al. (2017). The simulations adopt the state-of-the-art EAGLE galaxy formation model, with a gas particle mass of $1.8\times10^{6}\,\mathrm{M}_{\odot}$ and physical softening length of $0.7\,\mathrm{kpc}$. In this paper, we introduce the sample and present the low-redshift global properties of the clusters. We calculate the X-ray properties in a manner consistent with observational techniques, demonstrating the bias and scatter introduced by using estimated masses. We find the total stellar content and black hole masses of the clusters to be in good agreement with the observed relations. However, the clusters are too gas rich, suggesting that the AGN feedback model is not efficient enough at expelling gas from the high-redshift progenitors of the clusters. The X-ray properties, such as the spectroscopic temperature and the soft-band luminosity, and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich properties are in reasonable agreement with the observed relations. However, the clusters have too high central temperatures and larger-than-observed entropy cores, which is likely driven by the AGN feedback after the cluster core has formed. The total metal content and its distribution throughout the ICM are a good match to the observations.
  • We present a clustering comparison of 12 galaxy formation models (including Semi-Analytic Models (SAMs) and Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) models) all run on halo catalogues and merger trees extracted from a single {\Lambda}CDM N-body simulation. We compare the results of the measurements of the mean halo occupation numbers, the radial distribution of galaxies in haloes and the 2-Point Correlation Functions (2PCF). We also study the implications of the different treatments of orphan (galaxies not assigned to any dark matter subhalo) and non-orphan galaxies in these measurements. Our main result is that the galaxy formation models generally agree in their clustering predictions but they disagree significantly between HOD and SAMs for the orphan satellites. Although there is a very good agreement between the models on the 2PCF of central galaxies, the scatter between the models when orphan satellites are included can be larger than a factor of 2 for scales smaller than 1 Mpc/h. We also show that galaxy formation models that do not include orphan satellite galaxies have a significantly lower 2PCF on small scales, consistent with previous studies. Finally, we show that the 2PCF of orphan satellites is remarkably different between SAMs and HOD models. Orphan satellites in SAMs present a higher clustering than in HOD models because they tend to occupy more massive haloes. We conclude that orphan satellites have an important role on galaxy clustering and they are the main cause of the differences in the clustering between HOD models and SAMs.
  • We introduce the Hydrangea simulations, a suite of 24 cosmological hydrodynamic zoom-in simulations of massive galaxy clusters (M_200c = 10^14-10^15 M_Sun) with baryon particle masses of ~10^6 M_Sun. Designed to study the impact of the cluster environment on galaxy formation, they are a key part of the `Cluster-EAGLE' project (Barnes et al. 2017). They use a galaxy formation model developed for the EAGLE project, which has been shown to yield both realistic field galaxies and hot gas fractions of galaxy groups consistent with observations. The total stellar mass content of the simulated clusters agrees with observations, but central cluster galaxies are too massive, by up to 0.6 dex. Passive satellite fractions are higher than in the field, and at stellar masses Mstar > 10^10 M_Sun this environmental effect is quantitatively consistent with observations. The predicted satellite stellar mass function matches data from local cluster surveys. Normalized to total mass, there are fewer low-mass (Mstar < 10^10 M_Sun) galaxies within the virial radius of clusters than in the field, primarily due to star formation quenching. Conversely, the simulations predict an overabundance of massive galaxies in clusters compared to the field that persists to their far outskirts (> 5r_200c). This is caused by a significantly increased stellar mass fraction of (sub-)haloes in the cluster environment, by up to ~0.3 dex even well beyond r_200c. Haloes near clusters are also more concentrated than equally massive field haloes, but these two effects are largely uncorrelated.
  • We study the quenching of star formation as a function of redshift, environment and stellar mass in the galaxy formation simulations of Henriques et al. (2015), which implement an updated version of the Munich semi-analytic model (L-GALAXIES) on the two Millennium Simulations after scaling to a Planck cosmology. In this model massive galaxies are quenched by AGN feedback depending on both black hole and hot gas mass, and hence indirectly on stellar mass. In addition, satellite galaxies of any mass can be quenched by ram-pressure or tidal stripping of gas and through the suppression of gaseous infall. This combination of processes produces quenching efficiencies which depend on stellar mass, host halo mass, environment density, distance to group centre and group central galaxy properties in ways which agree qualitatively with observation. Some discrepancies remain in dense regions and close to group centres, where quenching still seems too efficient. In addition, although the mean stellar age of massive galaxies agrees with observation, the assumed AGN feedback model allows too much ongoing star formation at late times. The fact that both AGN feedback and environmental effects are stronger in higher density environments leads to a correlation between the quenching of central and satellite galaxies which roughly reproduces observed conformity trends inside haloes.
  • We adapt the L-Galaxies semi-analytic model to follow the star-formation histories (SFH) of galaxies -- by which we mean a record of the formation time and metallicities of the stars that are present in each galaxy at a given time. We use these to construct stellar spectra in post-processing, which offers large efficiency savings and allows user-defined spectral bands and dust models to be applied to data stored in the Millennium data repository. We contrast model SFHs from the Millennium Simulation with observed ones from the VESPA algorithm as applied to the SDSS-7 catalogue. The overall agreement is good, with both simulated and SDSS galaxies showing a steeper SFH with increased stellar mass. The SFHs of blue and red galaxies, however, show poor agreement between data and simulations, which may indicate that the termination of star formation is too abrupt in the models. The mean star-formation rate (SFR) of model galaxies is well-defined and is accurately modelled by a double power law at all redshifts: SFR proportional to $1/(x^{-1.39}+x^{1.33})$, where $x=(t_a-t)/3.0\,$Gyr, $t$ is the age of the stars and $t_a$ is the loopback time to the onset of galaxy formation; above a redshift of unity, this is well approximated by a gamma function: SFR proportional to $x^{1.5}e^{-x}$, where $x=(t_a-t)/2.0\,$Gyr. Individual galaxies, however, show a wide dispersion about this mean. When split by mass, the SFR peaks earlier for high-mass galaxies than for lower-mass ones, and we interpret this downsizing as a mass-dependence in the evolution of the quenched fraction: the SFHs of star-forming galaxies show only a weak mass dependence.
  • We measure the evolution of the velocity dispersion--temperature ($\sigma_{\rm v}$--$T_{\rm X}$) relation up to $z = 1$ using a sample of 38 galaxy clusters drawn from the \textit{XMM} Cluster Survey. This work improves upon previous studies by the use of a homogeneous cluster sample and in terms of the number of high redshift clusters included. We present here new redshift and velocity dispersion measurements for 12 $z > 0.5$ clusters observed with the GMOS instruments on the Gemini telescopes. Using an orthogonal regression method, we find that the slope of the relation is steeper than that expected if clusters were self-similar, and that the evolution of the normalisation is slightly negative, but not significantly different from zero ($\sigma_{\rm v} \propto T^{0.86 \pm 0.14} E(z)^{-0.37 \pm 0.33}$). We verify our results by applying our methods to cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. The lack of evolution seen in our data is consistent with simulations that include both feedback and radiative cooling.
  • Using the L-Galaxies semi-analytic model we simultaneously fit the HI mass function, stellar mass function and galaxy colours. We find good fits to all three observations at z = 0 and to the stellar mass function and galaxy colours at z = 2. Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques we adjust the L-Galaxies parameters to best fit the constraining data. In order to fit the HI mass function we must greatly reduce the gas surface density threshold for star formation, thus lowering the number of low HI mass galaxies. A simultaneous reduction in the star formation efficiency prevents the over production of stellar content. A simplified model in which the surface density threshold is eliminated altogether also provides a good fit to the data. Unfortunately, these changes weaken the fit to the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation and raise the star-formation rate density at recent times, suggesting that a change to the model is required to prevent accumulation of gas onto dwarf galaxies in the local universe.
  • Merger trees are routinely used to follow the growth and merging history of dark matter haloes and subhaloes in simulations of cosmic structure formation. Srisawat et al. (2013) compared a wide range of merger-tree-building codes. Here we test the influence of output strategies and mass resolution on tree-building. We find that, somewhat surprisingly, building the tree from more snapshots does not generally produce more complete trees; instead, it tends to short- en them. Significant improvements are seen for patching schemes which attempt to bridge over occasional dropouts in the underlying halo catalogues or schemes which combine the halo-finding and tree-building steps seamlessly. The adopted output strategy does not affec- t the average number of branches (bushiness) of the resultant merger trees. However, mass resolution has an influence on both main branch length and the bushiness. As the resolution increases, a halo with the same mass can be traced back further in time and will encounter more small progenitors during its evolutionary history. Given these results, we recommend that, for simulations intended as precursors for galaxy formation models where of order 100 or more snapshots are analysed, the tree-building routine should be integrated with the halo finder, or at the very least be able to patch over multiple adjacent snapshots.
  • We present an analysis of the iron abundance in the hot gas surrounding galaxy groups and clusters. To do this, we first compile and homogenise a large dataset of 79 low-redshift (|z| = 0.03) systems (159 individual measurements) from the literature. Our analysis accounts for differences in aperture size, solar abundance, and cosmology, and scales all measurements using customised radial profiles for the temperature (T), gas density, and iron abundance (Z). We then compare this dataset to groups and clusters in the L-Galaxies galaxy evolution model. Our homogenised dataset reveals a tight T-Z relation for clusters, with a scatter in Z of only 0.10 dex and a slight negative gradient. After examining potential measurement biases, we conclude that at least some of this negative gradient has a physical origin. Our model suggests greater accretion of hydrogen in the hottest systems, via stripping of gas from infalling satellites, as a cause. At lower temperatures, L-Galaxies over-estimates Z in groups, indicating that metal-rich gas removal (via e.g. AGN feedback) is required. L-Galaxies provides a reasonable match to the observed Z in the intracluster medium (ICM) of the hottest clusters from at least z ~ 1.3 to 0.3. This is achieved without needing to modify any of the galactic chemical evolution (GCE) model parameters. However, the Z in intermediate-temperature clusters appears to be under-estimated in our model at z = 0. The merits and problems with modifying the GCE modelling to correct this are discussed.
  • We propose a common terminology for use in describing both temporal merger trees and spatial structure trees for dark-matter halos. We specify a unified data format in HDF5 and provide example I/O routines in C, FORTRAN and PYTHON.
  • We present a comparison of 14 galaxy formation models: 12 different semi-analytical models and 2 halo-occupation distribution models for galaxy formation based upon the same cosmological simulation and merger tree information derived from it. The participating codes have proven to be very successful in their own right but they have all been calibrated independently using various observational data sets, stellar models, and merger trees. In this paper we apply them without recalibration and this leads to a wide variety of predictions for the stellar mass function, specific star formation rates, stellar-to- halo mass ratios, and the abundance of orphan galaxies. The scatter is much larger than seen in previous comparison studies primarily because the codes have been used outside of their native environment within which they are well tested and calibrated. The purpose of the `nIFTy comparison of galaxy formation models' is to bring together as many different galaxy formation modellers as possible and to investigate a common approach to model calibration. This paper provides a unified description for all participating models and presents the initial, uncalibrated comparison as a baseline for our future studies where we will develop a common calibration framework and address the extent to which that reduces the scatter in the model predictions seen here.
  • A halo merger tree forms the essential backbone of a semi-analytic model for galaxy formation and evolution. Recent studies have pointed out that extracting merger trees from numerical simulations of structure formation is non-trivial; different tree building algorithms can give differing merger histories. These differences should be carefully understood before merger trees are used as input for models of galaxy formation. We investigate the impact of different halo merger trees on a semi-analytic model. We find that the z=0 galaxy properties in our model show differences between trees when using a common parameter set. The star formation history of the Universe and the properties of satellite galaxies can show marked differences between trees with different construction methods. Independently calibrating the semi-analytic model for each tree can reduce the discrepancies between the z=0 global galaxy properties, at the cost of increasing the differences in the evolutionary histories of galaxies. Furthermore, the underlying physics implied can vary, resulting in key quantities such as the supernova feedback efficiency differing by factors of 2. Such a change alters the regimes where star formation is primarily suppressed by supernovae. Therefore, halo merger trees extracted from a common halo catalogue using different, but reliable, algorithms can result in a difference in the semi-analytic model. Given the uncertainties in galaxy formation physics, however, these differences may not necessarily be viewed as significant.
  • We introduce the Virgo Consortium's EAGLE project, a suite of hydrodynamical simulations that follow the formation of galaxies and black holes in representative volumes. We discuss the limitations of such simulations in light of their finite resolution and poorly constrained subgrid physics, and how these affect their predictive power. One major improvement is our treatment of feedback from massive stars and AGN in which thermal energy is injected into the gas without the need to turn off cooling or hydrodynamical forces, allowing winds to develop without predetermined speed or mass loading factors. Because the feedback efficiencies cannot be predicted from first principles, we calibrate them to the z~0 galaxy stellar mass function and the amplitude of the galaxy-central black hole mass relation, also taking galaxy sizes into account. The observed galaxy mass function is reproduced to $\lesssim 0.2$ dex over the full mass range, $10^8 < M_*/M_\odot \lesssim 10^{11}$, a level of agreement close to that attained by semi-analytic models, and unprecedented for hydrodynamical simulations. We compare our results to a representative set of low-redshift observables not considered in the calibration, and find good agreement with the observed galaxy specific star formation rates, passive fractions, Tully-Fisher relation, total stellar luminosities of galaxy clusters, and column density distributions of intergalactic CIV and OVI. While the mass-metallicity relations for gas and stars are consistent with observations for $M_* \gtrsim 10^9 M_\odot$, they are insufficiently steep at lower masses. The gas fractions and temperatures are too high for clusters of galaxies, but for groups these discrepancies can be resolved by adopting a higher heating temperature in the subgrid prescription for AGN feedback. EAGLE constitutes a valuable new resource for studies of galaxy formation.
  • We present results from a new set of 30 cosmological simulations of galaxy clusters, including the effects of radiative cooling, star formation, supernova feedback, black hole growth and AGN feedback. We first demonstrate that our AGN model is capable of reproducing the observed cluster pressure profile at redshift, z~0, once the AGN heating temperature of the targeted particles is made to scale with the final virial temperature of the halo. This allows the ejected gas to reach larger radii in higher-mass clusters than would be possible had a fixed heating temperature been used. Such a model also successfully reduces the star formation rate in brightest cluster galaxies and broadly reproduces a number of other observational properties at low redshift, including baryon, gas and star fractions; entropy profiles outside the core; and the X-ray luminosity-mass relation. Our results are consistent with the notion that the excess entropy is generated via selective removal of the densest material through radiative cooling; supernova and AGN feedback largely serve as regulation mechanisms, moving heated gas out of galaxies and away from cluster cores. However, our simulations fail to address a number of serious issues; for example, they are incapable of reproducing the shape and diversity of the observed entropy profiles within the core region. We also show that the stellar and black hole masses are sensitive to numerical resolution, particularly the gravitational softening length; a smaller value leads to more efficient black hole growth at early times and a smaller central galaxy.
  • Merger tree codes are routinely used to follow the growth and merger of dark matter haloes in simulations of cosmic structure formation. Whereas in Srisawat et. al. we compared the trees built using a wide variety of such codes here we study the influence of the underlying halo catalogue upon the resulting trees. We observe that the specifics of halo finding itself greatly influences the constructed merger trees. We find that the choices made to define the halo mass are of prime importance. For instance, amongst many potential options different finders select self-bound objects or spherical regions of defined overdensity, decide whether or not to include substructures within the mass returned and vary in their initial particle selection. The impact of these decisions is seen in tree length (the period of time a particularly halo can be traced back through the simulation), branching ratio (essentially the merger rate of \subhalos) and mass evolution. We therefore conclude that the choice of the underlying halo finder is more relevant to the process of building merger trees than the tree builder itself. We also report on some built-in features of specific merger tree codes that (sometimes) help to improve the quality of the merger trees produced.
  • Merger trees follow the growth and merger of dark-matter haloes over cosmic history. As well as giving important insights into the growth of cosmic structure in their own right, they provide an essential backbone to semi-analytic models of galaxy formation. This paper is the first in a series to arise from the SUSSING MERGER TREES Workshop in which ten different tree-building algorithms were applied to the same set of halo catalogues and their results compared. Although many of these codes were similar in nature, all algorithms produced distinct results. Our main conclusions are that a useful merger-tree code should possess the following features: (i) the use of particle IDs to match haloes between snapshots; (ii) the ability to skip at least one, and preferably more, snapshots in order to recover subhaloes that are temporarily lost during merging; (iii) the ability to cope with (and ideally smooth out) large, temporary flucuations in halo mass. Finally, to enable different groups to communicate effectively, we defined a common terminology that we used when discussing merger trees and we encourage others to adopt the same language. We also specified a minimal output format to record the results.
  • We update the treatment of chemical evolution in the Munich semi-analytic model, L-GALAXIES. Our new implementation includes delayed enrichment from stellar winds, supernovae type II (SNe-II) and supernovae type Ia (SNe-Ia), as well as metallicity-dependent yields and a reformulation of the associated supernova feedback. Two different sets of SN-II yields and three different SN-Ia delay-time distributions (DTDs) are considered, and eleven heavy elements (including O, Mg and Fe) are self-consistently tracked. We compare the results of this new implementation with data on a) local, star-forming galaxies, b) Milky Way disc G dwarfs, and c) local, elliptical galaxies. We find that the z=0 gas-phase mass-metallicity relation is very well reproduced for all forms of DTD considered, as is the [Fe/H] distribution in the Milky Way disc. The [O/Fe] distribution in the Milky Way disc is best reproduced when using a DTD with less than or equal to 50 per cent of SNe-Ia exploding within ~400 Myrs. Positive slopes in the mass-[alpha/Fe] relations of local ellipticals are also obtained when using a DTD with such a minor `prompt' component. Alternatively, metal-rich winds that drive light alpha elements directly out into the circumgalactic medium also produce positive slopes for all forms of DTD and SN-II yields considered. Overall, we find that the best model for matching the wide range of observational data considered here should include a power-law SN-Ia DTD, SN-II yields that take account of prior mass loss through stellar winds, and some direct ejection of light alpha elements out of galaxies.
  • We measure the evolution of the X-ray luminosity-temperature (L_X-T) relation since z~1.5 using a sample of 211 serendipitously detected galaxy clusters with spectroscopic redshifts drawn from the XMM Cluster Survey first data release (XCS-DR1). This is the first study spanning this redshift range using a single, large, homogeneous cluster sample. Using an orthogonal regression technique, we find no evidence for evolution in the slope or intrinsic scatter of the relation since z~1.5, finding both to be consistent with previous measurements at z~0.1. However, the normalisation is seen to evolve negatively with respect to the self-similar expectation: we find E(z)^{-1} L_X = 10^{44.67 +/- 0.09} (T/5)^{3.04 +/- 0.16} (1+z)^{-1.5 +/- 0.5}, which is within 2 sigma of the zero evolution case. We see milder, but still negative, evolution with respect to self-similar when using a bisector regression technique. We compare our results to numerical simulations, where we fit simulated cluster samples using the same methods used on the XCS data. Our data favour models in which the majority of the excess entropy required to explain the slope of the L_X-T relation is injected at high redshift. Simulations in which AGN feedback is implemented using prescriptions from current semi-analytic galaxy formation models predict positive evolution of the normalisation, and differ from our data at more than 5 sigma. This suggests that more efficient feedback at high redshift may be needed in these models.
  • We have exploited the large-volume Millennium Gas cosmological N-body hydrodynamics simulations to study the SZ cluster population at low and high redshift, for three models with varying gas physics. We confirm previous results using smaller samples that the intrinsic (spherical) Y_{500}-M_{500} relation has very little scatter (sigma_{log_{10}Y}~0.04), is insensitive to cluster gas physics and evolves to redshift one in accord with self-similar expectations. Our pre-heating and feedback models predict scaling relations that are in excellent agreement with the recent analysis from combined Planck and XMM-Newton data by the Planck Collaboration. This agreement is largely preserved when r_{500} and M_{500} are derived using the hydrostatic mass proxy, Y_{X,500}, albeit with significantly reduced scatter (sigma_{log_{10}Y}~0.02), a result that is due to the tight correlation between Y_{500} and Y_{X,500}. Interestingly, this assumption also hides any bias in the relation due to dynamical activity. We also assess the importance of projection effects from large-scale structure along the line-of-sight, by extracting cluster Y_{500} values from fifty simulated 5x5 square degree sky maps. Once the (model-dependent) mean signal is subtracted from the maps we find that the integrated SZ signal is unbiased with respect to the underlying clusters, although the scatter in the (cylindrical) Y_{500}-M_{500} relation increases in the pre-heating case, where a significant amount of energy was injected into the intergalactic medium at high redshift. Finally, we study the hot gas pressure profiles to investigate the origin of the SZ signal and find that the largest contribution comes from radii close to r_{500} in all cases. The profiles themselves are well described by generalised Navarro, Frenk & White profiles but there is significant cluster-to-cluster scatter.
  • The Millennium Gas project aims to undertake smoothed-particle hydrodynamic resimulations of the Millennium Simulation, providing many hundred massive galaxy clusters for comparison with X-ray surveys (170 clusters with kTsl > 3 keV). This paper looks at the hot gas and stellar fractions of clusters in simulations with different physical heating mechanisms. These fail to reproduce cool-core systems but are successful in matching the hot gas profiles of non-cool-core clusters. Although there is immense scatter in the observational data, the simulated clusters broadly match the integrated gas fractions within r500 . In line with previous work, however, they fare much less well when compared to the stellar fractions, having a dependence on cluster mass that is much weaker than is observed. The evolution with redshift of the hot gas fraction is much larger in the simulation with early preheating than in one with continual feedback; observations favour the latter model. The strong dependence of hot gas fraction on cluster physics limits its use as a probe of cosmological parameters.
  • We introduce a new physical recipe into the De Lucia and Blaizot version of the Munich semi-analytic model built upon the Millennium dark matter simulation: the tidal stripping of stellar material from satellite galaxies during mergers. To test the significance of the new physical process we apply a Monte Carlo Markov Chain parameter estimation technique constraining the model with the $K$-band luminosity function, $B-V$ colours and the black hole-bulge mass relation. The differences in parameter correlations, and in the allowed regions in likelihood space, reveal the impact of the new physics on the basic ingredients of the model, such as the star-formation laws, feedback recipes and the black hole growth model. With satellite disruption in place, we get a model likelihood four times higher than in the original model, indicating that the new process seems to be favoured by observations. This is achieved mainly due to a reduction in black hole growth that produces a better agreement between the properties of central black holes and host galaxies. Compared to the best-fit model without disruption, the new model removes the excess of dwarf galaxies in the original recipe with a more modest supernova heating. The new model is now consistent with the three observational data sets used to constrain it, while significantly improving the agreement with observations for the distribution of metals in stars. Moreover, the model now follows the build up of intra-cluster light.
  • The relativistic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect offers a method, independent of X-ray, for measuring the temperature of the intracluster medium (ICM) in the hottest systems. Here, using N-body/hydrodynamic simulations of three galaxy clusters, we compare the two quantities for a non-radiative ICM, and for one that is subject both to radiative cooling and strong energy feedback from galaxies. Our study has yielded two interesting results. Firstly, in all cases, the SZ temperature is hotter than the X-ray temperature and is within ten per cent of the virial temperature of the cluster. Secondly, the mean SZ temperature is less affected by cooling and feedback than the X-ray temperature. Both these results can be explained by the SZ temperature being less sensitive to the distribution of cool gas associated with cluster substructure. A comparison of the SZ and X-ray temperatures (measured for a sample of hot clusters) would therefore yield interesting constraints on the thermodynamic structure of the intracluster gas.
  • We present results of a new feedback scheme implemented in the Munich galaxy formation model. The new scheme includes a dynamical treatment of galactic winds powered by supernovae explosions and stellar winds in a cosmological context. We find that such a scheme is a good alternative to empirically-motivated recipes for feedback in galaxy formation. Model results are in good agreement with the observed luminosity functions and stellar mass function for galaxies in the local Universe. In particular, the new scheme predicts a number density of dwarfs that is lower than in previous models. This is a consequence of a new feature of the model, that allows an estimate of the amount of mass and metals that haloes can permanently deposit into the IGM. This loss of material leads to the suppression of star formation in small haloes and therefore to the decrease in the number density of dwarf galaxies. The model is able to reproduce the observed mass-stellar metallicity and luminosity-gas metallicity relationships. This demonstrates that our scheme provides a significant improvement in the treatment of the feedback in dwarf galaxies. Despite these successes, our model does not reproduce the observed bimodality in galaxy colours and predicts a larger number of bright galaxies than observed. Finally, we investigate the efficiency of metal injection in winds and in the intergalactic medium. We find that galaxies that reside in haloes with M_vir < 10^12 M_sun/h may deposit most of their metal mass into the intergalactic medium, while groups and clusters at z=0 have lost at most a few percent of their metals before the bulk of the halo mass was accreted.