• We present the discovery and measurements of a gravitationally lensed supernova (SN) behind the galaxy cluster MOO J1014+0038. Based on multi-band Hubble Space Telescope and Very Large Telescope (VLT) photometry of the supernova, and VLT spectroscopy of the host galaxy, we find a 97.5% probability that this SN is a SN Ia, and a 2.5% chance of a CC SN. Our typing algorithm combines the shape and color of the light curve with the expected rates of each SN type in the host galaxy. With a redshift of 2.2216, this is the highest redshift SN Ia discovered with a spectroscopic host-galaxy redshift. A further distinguishing feature is that the lensing cluster, at redshift 1.23, is the most distant to date to have an amplified SN. The SN lies in the middle of the color and light-curve shape distributions found at lower redshift, disfavoring strong evolution to z = 2.22. We estimate an amplification due to gravitational lensing of 2.8+0.6-0.5 (1.10 +- 0.23 mag)---compatible with the value estimated from the weak-lensing-derived mass and the mass-concentration relation from LambdaCDM simulations---making it the most amplified SN Ia discovered behind a galaxy cluster.
  • We report spectroscopic results from our 40-orbit $Hubble~Space~Telescope$ slitless grism spectroscopy program observing the 20 densest CARLA candidate galaxy clusters at $1.4 < z < 2.8$. These candidate rich structures, among the richest and most distant known, were identified on the basis of $[3.6]-[4.5]$ color from a $408~$hr multi-cycle $Spitzer$ program targeting $420$ distant radio-loud AGN. We report the spectroscopic confirmation of $16$ distant structures at $1.4 < z < 2.8$ associated with the targeted powerful high-redshift radio-loud AGN. We also report the serendipitous discovery and spectroscopic confirmation of seven additional structures at $0.87 < z < 2.12$ not associated with the targeted radio-loud AGN. We find that $10^{10} - 10^{11}\,M_{\odot}$ member galaxies of our confirmed CARLA structures form significantly fewer stars than their field counterparts at all redshifts within $1.4\leq z\leq 2$. We also observe higher star-forming activity in the structure cores up to $z = 2$, finding similar trends as cluster surveys at slightly lower redshifts ($1.0 < z < 1.5$). By design, our efficient strategy of obtaining just two grism orbits per field only obtains spectroscopic confirmation of emission-line galaxies. Deeper spectroscopy will be required to study the population of evolved, massive galaxies in these (forming) clusters. Lacking multi-band coverage of the fields, we adopt a very conservative approach of calling all confirmations "structures", although we note that a number of features are consistent with some of them being bona fide galaxy clusters. Together, this survey represents a unique and large homogenous sample of spectroscopically confirmed structures at high redshifts, potentially more than doubling the census of confirmed, massive clusters at $z > 1.4$.
  • ATLAS (Astrophysics Telescope for Large Area Spectroscopy) Probe is a concept for a NASA probe-class space mission, the spectroscopic follow-up to WFIRST, multiplexing its scientific return by obtaining deep 1 to 4 micron slit spectroscopy for ~90% of all galaxies imaged by the ~2200 sq deg WFIRST High Latitude Survey at z > 0.5. ATLAS spectroscopy will measure accurate and precise redshifts for ~300M galaxies out to z < 7, and deliver spectra that enable a wide range of diagnostic studies of the physical properties of galaxies over most of cosmic history. ATLAS and WFIRST together will produce a 3D map of the Universe with ~Mpc resolution in redshift space. ATLAS will: (1) Revolutionize galaxy evolution studies by tracing the relation between galaxies and dark matter from galaxy groups to cosmic voids and filaments, from the epoch of reionization through the peak era of galaxy assembly; (2) Open a new window into the dark Universe by weighing the dark matter filaments using 3D weak lensing with spectroscopic redshifts, and obtaining definitive measurements of dark energy and modification of General Relativity using galaxy clustering; (3) Probe the Milky Way's dust-enshrouded regions, reaching the far side of our Galaxy; and (4) Explore the formation history of the outer Solar System by characterizing Kuiper Belt Objects. ATLAS is a 1.5m telescope with a field of view (FoV) of 0.4 sq deg, and uses Digital Micro-mirror Devices (DMDs) as slit selectors. It has a spectroscopic resolution of R = 600, a wavelength range of 1-4 microns, and a spectroscopic multiplex factor ~5,000-10,000. ATLAS is designed to fit within the NASA probe-class mission cost envelope; it has a single instrument, a telescope aperture that allows for a lighter launch vehicle, and mature technology (DMDs can reach TRL 6 within 2 years). ATLAS will lead to transformative science over the entire range of astrophysics.
  • We present a weak-lensing study of SPT-CLJ2040-4451 and IDCSJ1426+3508 at z=1.48 and 1.75, respectively. The two clusters were observed in our "See Change" program, a HST survey of 12 massive high-redshift clusters aimed at high-z supernova measurements and weak-lensing estimation of accurate cluster masses. We detect weak but significant galaxy shape distortions using IR images from the WFC3, which has not yet been used for weak-lensing studies. Both clusters appear to possess relaxed morphology in projected mass distribution, and their mass centroids agree nicely with those defined by both the galaxy luminosity and X-ray emission. Using an NFW profile, for which we assume that the mass is tightly correlated with the concentration parameter, we determine the masses of SPT-CL J2040-4451 and IDCS J1426+3508 to be M_{200}=8.6_{-1.4}^{+1.7}x10^14 M_sun and 2.2_{-0.7}^{+1.1}x10^14 M_sun, respectively. The weak-lensing mass of SPT-CLJ2040-4451 shows that the cluster is clearly a rare object. Adopting the central value, the expected abundance of such a massive cluster at z>1.48 is only ~0.07 in the parent 2500 sq. deg. survey. However, it is yet premature to claim that the presence of this cluster creates a serious tension with the current LCDM paradigm unless that tension will remain in future studies after marginalizing over many sources of uncertainties such as the accuracy of the mass function and the mass-concentration relation at the high mass end. The mass of IDCSJ1426+3508 is in excellent agreement with our previous ACS-based weak-lensing result while the much higher source density from our WFC3 imaging data makes the current statistical uncertainty ~40% smaller.
  • We present HST WFC3 F160W imaging and infrared spectral energy distributions for twelve extremely luminous, obscured AGN at $1.8<z<2.7$, selected via "Hot, Dust Obscured" mid-infrared colors. Their infrared luminosities span $2-15\times10^{13}$L$_{\odot}$, making them among the most luminous objects in the Universe at $z\sim2$. In all cases the infrared emission is consistent with arising at least in most part from AGN activity. The AGN fractional luminosities are higher than those in either sub-millimeter galaxies, or AGN selected via other mid-infrared criteria. Adopting the $G$, M$_{20}$ and $A$ morphological parameters, together with traditional classification boundaries, infers that three quarters of the sample as mergers. Our sample do not, however, show any correlation between the considered morphological parameters and either infrared luminosity or AGN fractional luminosity. Moreover, their asymmetries and effective radii are distributed identically to those of massive galaxies at $z\sim2$. We conclude that our sample is not preferentially associated with mergers, though a significant merger fraction is still plausible. Instead, we propose that our sample are examples of the massive galaxy population at $z\sim2$ that harbor a briefly luminous, "flickering" AGN, and in which the $G$ and M$_{20}$ values have been perturbed, due to either the AGN, and/or the earliest formation stages of a bulge in an inside-out manner. Furthermore, we find that the mass assembly of the central black holes in our sample leads the mass assembly of any bulge component. Finally, we speculate that our sample represent a small fraction of the immediate antecedents of compact star-forming galaxies at $z\sim2$.
  • We investigate extremely luminous dusty galaxies in the environments around WISE-selected hot dust obscured galaxies (Hot DOGs) and WISE/radio-selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at average redshifts of z = 2.7 and z = 1.7, respectively. Previous observations have detected overdensities of companion submillimetre-selected sources around 10 Hot DOGs and 30 WISE/radio AGNs, with overdensities of ~ 2 - 3 and ~ 5 - 6 , respectively. We find that the space densities in both samples to be overdense compared to normal star-forming galaxies and submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) in the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey (S2CLS). Both samples of companion sources have consistent mid-IR colours and mid-IR to submm ratios as SMGs. The brighter population around WISE/radio AGNs could be responsible for the higher overdensity reported. We also find the star formation rate density (SFRDs) are higher than the field, but consistent with clusters of dusty galaxies. WISE-selected AGNs appear to be good signposts for protoclusters at high redshift on arcmin scales. The results reported here provide an upper limit to the strength of angular clustering using the two-point correlation function. Monte Carlo simulations show no angular correlation, which could indicate protoclusters on scales larger than the SCUBA-2 1.5arcmin scale maps.
  • We present a detailed, multi-wavelength study of star formation (SF) and AGN activity in 11 near-infrared (IR) selected, spectroscopically confirmed, massive ($\gtrsim10^{14}\,\rm{M_{\odot}}$) galaxy clusters at $1<z<1.75$. Using new, deep $Herschel$/PACS imaging, we characterize the optical to far-IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for IR-luminous cluster galaxies, finding that they can, on average, be well described by field galaxy templates. Identification and decomposition of AGN through SED fittings allows us to include the contribution to cluster SF from AGN host galaxies. We quantify the star-forming fraction, dust-obscured SF rates (SFRs), and specific-SFRs for cluster galaxies as a function of cluster-centric radius and redshift. In good agreement with previous studies, we find that SF in cluster galaxies at $z\gtrsim1.4$ is largely consistent with field galaxies at similar epochs, indicating an era before significant quenching in the cluster cores ($r<0.5\,$Mpc). This is followed by a transition to lower SF activity as environmental quenching dominates by $z\sim1$. Enhanced SFRs are found in lower mass ($10.1< \log \rm{M_{\star}}/\rm{M_{\odot}}<10.8$) cluster galaxies. We find significant variation in SF from cluster-to-cluster within our uniformly selected sample, indicating that caution should be taken when evaluating individual clusters. We examine AGN in clusters from $z=0.5-2$, finding an excess AGN fraction at $z\gtrsim1$, suggesting environmental triggering of AGN during this epoch. We argue that our results $-$ a transition from field-like to quenched SF, enhanced SF in lower mass galaxies in the cluster cores, and excess AGN $-$ are consistent with a co-evolution between SF and AGN in clusters and an increased merger rate in massive haloes at high redshift.
  • We present a weak lensing study of the galaxy cluster IDCS J1426.5+3508 at $z=1.75$, which is the highest redshift strong lensing cluster known and the most distant cluster for which a weak lensing analysis has been undertaken. Using F160W, F814W, and F606W observations with the Hubble Space Telescope, we detect tangential shear at $2\sigma$ significance. Fitting a Navarro-Frenk-White mass profile to the shear with a theoretical median mass-concentration relation, we derive a mass $M_{200,\mathrm{crit}}=2.3^{+2.1}_{-1.4}\times10^{14}$ M$_{\odot}$. This mass is consistent with previous mass estimates from the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, X-ray, and strong lensing. The cluster lies on the local SZ-weak lensing mass scaling relation observed at low redshift, indicative of minimal evolution in this relation.
  • We present ALMA 870 micron (345 GHz) data for 49 high redshift (0.47<z<2.85), luminous (11.7 < log L(bol) (Lsun) < 14.2) radio-powerful AGN, obtained to constrain cool dust emission from starbursts concurrent with highly obscured radiative-mode black hole (BH) accretion in massive galaxies which possess a small radio jet. The sample was selected from WISE with extremely steep (red) mid-infrared (MIR) colors and with compact radio emission from NVSS/FIRST. Twenty-six sources are detected at 870 microns, and we find that the sample has large mid- to far-infrared luminosity ratios consistent with a dominant and highly obscured quasar. The rest-frame 3 GHz radio powers are 24.7 < log P3.0 GHz (W/Hz) < 27.3, and all sources are radio-intermediate or radio-loud. BH mass estimates are 7.7 < log M(BH) (Msun) < 10.2. The rest frame 1-5 um SEDs are very similar to the "Hot DOGs" (Hot Dust Obscured Galaxies), and steeper (redder) than almost any other known extragalactic sources. ISM masses estimated for the ALMA detected sources are 9.9 < log M(ISM) (Msun) < 11.75 assuming a dust temperature of 30K. The cool dust emission is consistent with star formation rates (SFRs) reaching several thousand Msun/yr, depending on the assumed dust temperature, however we cannot rule out the alternative that the AGN powers all the emission in some cases. Our best constrained source has radiative transfer solutions with ~ equal contributions from an obscured AGN and a young (10-15 Myr) compact starburst.
  • We present 20 WISE-selected galaxies with bolometric luminosities L_bol > 10^14 L_sun, including five with infrared luminosities L_IR = L(rest 8-1000 micron) > 10^14 L_sun. These "extremely luminous infrared galaxies," or ELIRGs, were discovered using the "W1W2-dropout" selection criteria which requires marginal or non-detections at 3.4 and 4.6 micron (W1 and W2, respectively) but strong detections at 12 and 22 micron in the WISE survey. Their spectral energy distributions are dominated by emission at rest-frame 4-10 micron, suggesting that hot dust with T_d ~ 450K is responsible for the high luminosities. These galaxies are likely powered by highly obscured AGNs, and there is no evidence suggesting these systems are beamed or lensed. We compare this WISE-selected sample with 116 optically selected quasars that reach the same L_bol level, corresponding to the most luminous unobscured quasars in the literature. We find that the rest-frame 5.8 and 7.8 micron luminosities of the WISE-selected ELIRGs can be 30-80% higher than that of the unobscured quasars. The existence of AGNs with L_bol > 10^14 L_sun at z > 3 suggests that these supermassive black holes are born with large mass, or have very rapid mass assembly. For black hole seed masses ~ 10^3 M_sun, either sustained super-Eddington accretion is needed, or the radiative efficiency must be <15%, implying a black hole with slow spin, possibly due to chaotic accretion.
  • We present JCMT SCUBA-2 850microns submillimetre (submm) observations of 30 mid-infrared (mid-IR) luminous AGN, detected jointly by the WISE all-sky IR survey and the NVSS/FIRST radio survey. These rare sources are selected by their extremely red mid-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and compact radio counterparts. Further investigations show that they are highly obscured, have abundant warm AGN-heated dust and are thought to be experiencing intense AGN feedback. These galaxies appear to be consistent with an AGN-dominated galaxy, and could be a transient phase of merging galaxies. When comparing the number of submm galaxies (SMGs) detected serendipitously in the surrounding 1.5-arcmin to those in blank-field submm surveys, there is a very significant overdensity, of order 5, but no sign of radial clustering centred at our primary objects. The WISE/radio-selected AGN thus reside in 10-Mpc-scale overdense environments, that could be forming in pre-viralised clusters of galaxies. WISE/radio-selected AGNs appear to be the strongest signposts of high-density regions of active, luminous and dusty galaxies. SCUBA-2 850microns observations indicate that their submm fluxes are low compared to many popular AGN SED templates, hence the WISE/radio-selected AGNs have either less cold and/or more warm dust emission than normally assumed for typical AGN. Most of the targets are not detected, only four targets are detected at SCUBA-2 850microns, and have total IR luminosities >= 10^13 L_solar, if their redshifts are consistent with the subset of the 10 SCUBA-2 undetected targets with known redshifts, z ~ 0.44 - 2.86.
  • We present SCUBA-2 850um submillimetre (submm) observations of the fields of 10 dusty, luminous galaxies at z ~ 1.7 - 4.6, detected at 12um and/or 22um by the WISE all-sky survey, but faint or undetected at 3.4um and 4.6um; dubbed hot, dust-obscured galaxies (Hot DOGs). The six detected targets all have total infrared luminosities greater than 10^13 L_sun, with one greater than 10^14 L_sun. Their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are very blue from mid-infrared to submm wavelengths and not well fitted by standard AGN SED templates, without adding extra dust extinction to fit the WISE 3.4um and 4.6um data. The SCUBA-2 850um observations confirm that the Hot DOGs have less cold and/or more warm dust emission than standard AGN templates, and limit an underlying extended spiral or ULIRG-type galaxy to contribute less than about 2% or 55% of the typical total Hot DOG IR luminosity, respectively. The two most distant and luminous targets have similar observed submm to mid-infrared ratios to the rest, and thus appear to have even hotter SEDs. The number of serendipitous submm galaxies (SMGs) detected in the 1.5-arcmin-radius SCUBA-2 850um maps indicates there is a significant over-density of serendipitous sources around Hot DOGs. These submm observations confirm that the WISE-selected ultra-luminous galaxies have very blue mid-infrared to submm SEDs, suggesting that they contain very powerful AGN, and are apparently located in unusual arcmin-scale overdensities of very luminous dusty galaxies.
  • On behalf of the WISE Science team, we present the discovery of a class of distant dust-enshrouded galaxies with extremely high luminosity. These galaxies are selected to have extreme red colors in the mid-IR using NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). They are faint in the optical and near-IR, predominantly at z=2-4, and with IR luminosity > $10^{13}\, L_{Sun}$, making them Hyper-Luminous Infrared Galaxies (HyLIRGs). SEDs incorporating the WISE, Spitzer, and Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometry indicate hot dust dominates the bolometric luminosity, presumably powered by AGN. Preliminary multi-wavelength follow-up suggests that they are different from normal populations in the local M-sigma relation. Their low source density implies that these objects are either intrinsically rare, or a short-lived phase in a more numerous population. If the latter is the case, these hot, dust-enshrouded galaxies may be an early stage in the interplay between AGN and galaxies.
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope near-IR spectroscopy for 18 galaxy clusters at 1.0 < $z$ < 1.5 in the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey. We use Wide Field Camera 3 grism data to spectroscopically identify H$\alpha$ emitters in both the cores of galaxy clusters as well as in field galaxies. We find a large cluster-to-cluster scatter in the star formation rates within a projected radius of 500 kpc, and many of our clusters (~60%) have significant levels of star formation within a projected radius of 200 kpc. A stacking analysis reveals that dust reddening in these star-forming galaxies is positively correlated with stellar mass and may be higher in the field than the cluster at a fixed stellar mass. This may indicate a lower amount of gas in star-forming cluster galaxies than in the field population. Also, H$\alpha$ equivalent widths of star-forming galaxies in the cluster environment are still suppressed below the level of the field. This suppression is most significant for lower mass galaxies (log M$_{*}$ < 10.0 M$_{\odot}$). We therefore conclude that environmental effects are still important at 1.0 < $z$ < 1.5 for star-forming galaxies in galaxy clusters with log M$_{*}$ < 10.0 M$_{\odot}$.
  • We present WISE All-Sky mid-infrared (IR) survey detections of 55% (17/31) of the known QSOs at z>6 from a range of surveys: the SDSS, the CFHT-LS, FIRST, Spitzer and UKIDSS. The WISE catalog thus provides a substantial increase in the quantity of IR data available for these sources: 17 are detected in the WISE W1 (3.4-micron) band, 16 in W2 (4.6-micron), 3 in W3 (12-micron) and 0 in W4 (22-micron). This is particularly important with Spitzer in its warm-mission phase and no faint follow-up capability at wavelengths longwards of 5 microns until the launch of JWST. WISE thus provides a useful tool for understanding QSOs found in forthcoming large-area optical/IR sky surveys, using PanSTARRS, SkyMapper, VISTA, DES and LSST. The rest-UV properties of the WISE-detected and the WISE-non-detected samples differ: the detections have brighter i/z-band magnitudes and redder rest-UV colors. This suggests that a more aggressive hunt for very-high-redshift QSOs, by combining WISE W1 and W2 data with red observed optical colors could be effective at least for a subset of dusty candidate QSOs. Stacking the WISE images of the WISE-non-detected QSOs indicates that they are on average significantly fainter than the WISE-detected examples, and are thus not narrowly missing detection in the WISE catalog. The WISE-catalog detection of three of our sample in the W3 band indicates that their mid-IR flux can be detected individually, although there is no stacked W3 detection of sources detected in W1 but not W3. Stacking analyses of WISE data for large AGN samples will be a useful tool, and high-redshift QSOs of all types will be easy targets for JWST.
  • We report the discovery of an IR-selected galaxy cluster in the IRAC Distant Cluster Survey (IDCS). New data from the Hubble Space Telescope spectroscopically confirm IDCS J1433.2+3306 at z = 1.89 with robust spectroscopic redshifts for seven members, two of which are based on the 4000 Angstrom break. Detected emission lines such as [OII] and Hbeta indicate star formation rates of >20 solar masses per year for three galaxies within a 500 kpc projected radius of the cluster center. The cluster exhibits a red sequence with a scatter and color indicative of a formation redshift z > 3.5. The stellar age of the early-type galaxy population is approximately consistent with those of clusters at lower redshift (1 < z < 1.5) suggesting that clusters at these redshifts are experiencing ongoing or increasing star formation.
  • We report a new technique to select 1.6<z<4.6 dusty Lyman-alpha emitters (LAEs), over a third of which are `blobs' (LABs) with emission extended on scales of 30-100kpc. Combining data from the NASA Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission with optical spectroscopy from the W.M. Keck telescope, we present a color criteria that yields a 78% success rate in identifying rare, dusty LAEs of which at least 37% are LABs. The objects have a surface density of only ~0.1 per square degree, making them rare enough that they have been largely missed in narrow surveys. We measured spectroscopic redshifts for 92 of these WISE-selected, typically radio-quiet galaxies and find that the LAEs (LABs) have a median redshift of 2.3 (2.5). The WISE photometry coupled with data from Herschel reveals that these galaxies have extreme far-infrared luminosities (L_IR>10^{13-14}L_sun) and warm colors, typically larger than submillimeter-selected galaxies (SMGs) and dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs). These traits are commonly associated with the dust being energized by intense AGN activity. We hypothesize that the combination of spatially extended Lyman-alpha, large amounts of warm IR-luminous dust, and rarity (implying a short-lived phase) can be explained if the galaxies are undergoing strong `feedback' transforming them from an extreme dusty starburst to a QSO.
  • We confirm the detection of 3 groups in the Lynx supercluster, at z~1.3, and give their redshifts and masses. We study the properties of the group galaxies as compared to the central clusters, RXJ0849+4452 and RXJ0848+4453, selecting 89 galaxies in the clusters and 74 galaxies in the groups. We morphologically classify galaxies by visual inspection, noting that our early-type galaxy (ETG) sample would have been contaminated at the 30% -40% level by simple automated classification methods (e.g. based on Sersic index). In luminosity selected samples, both clusters and groups show high fractions of Sa galaxies. The ETG fractions never rise above ~50% in the clusters, which is low compared to the fractions observed in clusters at z~1. However, ETG plus Sa fractions are similar to those observed for ETGs in clusters at z~1. Bulge-dominated galaxies visually classified as Sas might also be ETGs with tidal features or merger remnants. They are mainly red and passive, and span a large range in luminosity. Their star formation seems to have been quenched before experiencing a morphological transformation. Because their fraction is smaller at lower redshifts, they might be the spiral population that evolves into ETGs. For mass-selected samples, the ETG fraction show no significant evolution with respect to local clusters, suggesting that morphological transformations occur at lower masses and densities. The ETG mass-size relation shows evolution towards smaller sizes at higher redshift in both clusters and groups, while the late-type mass-size relation matches that observed locally. The group ETG red sequence shows lower zero points and larger scatters than in clusters, both expected to be an indication of a younger galaxy population. The estimated age difference is small when compared to the difference in age at different galaxy masses.
  • The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) is an extremely capable and efficient black hole finder. We present a simple mid-infrared color criterion, W1-W2 \geq 0.8 (i.e., [3.4]-[4.6] \geq 0.8, Vega), which identifies 61.9 \pm 5.4 AGN candidates per deg2 to a depth of W2 = 15.0. This implies a much larger census of luminous AGN than found by typical wide-area surveys, attributable to the fact that mid-infrared selection identifies both unobscured (type 1) and obscured (type 2) AGN. Optical and soft X-ray surveys alone are highly biased towards only unobscured AGN, while this simple WISE selection likely identifies even heavily obscured, Compton-thick AGN. Using deep, public data in the COSMOS field, we explore the properties of WISE-selected AGN candidates. At the mid-infrared depth considered, 160 uJy at 4.6 microns, this simple criterion identifies 78% of Spitzer mid-infrared AGN candidates according to the criteria of Stern et al. (2005) and the reliability is 95%. We explore the demographics, multiwavelength properties and redshift distribution of WISE-selected AGN candidates in the COSMOS field.
  • We describe the infrared properties of sources detected over ~36 deg^2 of sky in the GAMA 15-hr equatorial field, using data from both the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large-Area Survey (H-ATLAS) and Wide-field Infrared Survey (WISE). With 5-sigma point-source depths of 34 and 0.048 mJy at 250 micron and 3.4 micron, respectively, we are able to identify 50.6% of the H-ATLAS sources in the WISE survey, corresponding to a surface density of ~630 deg^{-2}. Approximately two-thirds of these sources have measured spectroscopic or optical/near-IR photometric redshifts of z<1. For sources with spectroscopic redshifts at z<0.3, we find a linear correlation between the infrared luminosity at 3.4 micron and that at 250 micron, with +-50% scatter over ~1.5 orders of magnitude in luminosity, ~10^9 - 10^{10.5} L_sun. By contrast, the matched sources without previously measured redshifts (r>~20.5) have 250-350 micron flux density ratios that suggest either high-redshift galaxies (z>~1.5) or optically faint low-redshift galaxies with unusually low temperatures (T<~20). Their small 3.4-250 micron flux ratios favor a high-redshift galaxy population, as only the most actively star-forming galaxies at low redshift (e.g., Arp 220) exhibit comparable flux density ratios. Furthermore, we find a relatively large AGN fraction (~30%) in a 12 micron flux-limited subsample of H-ATLAS sources, also consistent with there being a significant population of high-redshift sources in the no-redshift sample.
  • [NIRSS is one of three concepts that contributed to the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission advocated by the Decadal Survey.] Operating beyond the reaches of the Earth's atmosphere, free of its limiting absorption and thermal background, the Near-Infrared Sky Surveyor (NIRSS) will deeply map the entire sky at near-infrared wavelengths, thereby enabling new and fundamental discoveries ranging from the identification of extrasolar planets to probing the reionization epoch by identifying thousands of quasars at z>10. NIRSS will directly address the NASA scientific objective of studying cosmic origins by using a 1.5-meter telescope to reach full-sky 0.2 uJy (25.6 mag AB) sensitivities in four passbands from 1 to 4 microns in a 4-yr mission. At the three shorter passbands (1 - 2.5 microns), the proposed depth is comparable to the deepest pencil-beam surveys done to date and is 3000 times more sensitive than the only previous all-sky near-infrared survey, 2MASS. At the longest passband (3.5 micron), which is not feasible from the ground, NIRSS will be 500 times more sensitive than WISE. NIRSS fills a pivotal gap in our knowledge of the celestial sphere, is a natural complement to WISE, and is well matched to the next generation of deep (0.1 uJy), wide-area (>2 pi ster), ground-based optical surveys (LSST and Pan-Starrs). With the high thermal backgrounds of ground-based infrared observations, a near-infrared full sky survey at sub-uJy sensitivity is only feasible from space.
  • We present the 24 micron rest-frame luminosity function (LF) of star-forming galaxies in the redshift range 0.0 < z < 0.6 constructed from 4047 spectroscopic redshifts from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey of 24 micron selected sources in the Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. This sample provides the best available combination of large area (9 deg^2), depth, and statistically complete spectroscopic observations, allowing us to probe the evolution of the 24 micron LF of galaxies at low and intermediate redshifts while minimizing the effects of cosmic variance. In order to use the observed 24 micron luminosity as a tracer for star formation, active galactic nuclei (AGNs) that could contribute significantly at 24 micron are identified and excluded from our star-forming galaxy sample based on their mid-IR spectral energy distributions or the detection of X-ray emission. The evolution of the 24 micron LF of star-forming galaxies for redshifts of z < 0.65 is consistent with a pure luminosity evolution where the characteristic 24 micron luminosity evolves as (1+z)^(3.8+/-0.3). We extend our evolutionary study to encompass 0.0 < z < 1.2 by combining our data with that of the Far-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey. Over this entire redshift range the evolution of the characteristic 24 micron luminosity is described by a slightly shallower power law of (1+z)^(3.4+/-0.2). We find a local star formation rate density of (1.09+/-0.21) x 10^-2 Msun/yr/Mpc^-3, and that it evolves as (1+z)^(3.5+/-0.2) over 0.0 < z < 1.2. These estimates are in good agreement with the rates using optical and UV fluxes corrected for the effects of intrinsic extinction in the observed sources. This agreement confirms that star formation at z <~ 1.2 is robustly traced by 24 micron observations and that it largely occurs in obscured regions of galaxies. (Abridged)
  • Explorers have made breakthroughs in many fields of astrophysics. The science from both these missions contributed to three Nobel Prizes - Giacconi (2002), Mather, and Smoot (2006). Explorers have: marked the definitive beginning of precision cosmology, discovered that short gamma-ray bursts are caused by compact star mergers and have measured metalicity to redshifts z>6. NASA Explorers do cutting-edge science that cannot be done by facility-class instruments. The Explorer program provides a rapid response to changing science and technology, to enable cutting-edge science at moderate cost. Explorers also enable innovation, and engage & train scientists, managers and engineers, adding human capital to NASA and the nation. The astrophysics Explorer launch rate now being achieved is 1 per 3 years, and budget projections are in the $150M/year range for the next five years. A newly Vigorous Explorer Program should be created to: 1. Reach the long-stated goal of annual astrophysics launches; 2. Find additional launch options for Explorers and actively encourage cost savings in launchers and spacecraft, such as new commercial vehicles and innovative partnerships. 3. Mitigate risk via stronger technical development and sub-orbital programs, and through longer, more thorough, Phase A programs, potentially reducing the need for a 30% contingency; 4. Strive to protect the funding for missions that have reached Phase B, to prevent significant launch slips and cancellations, with a goal of 4 to 5 years from Phase B to launch; 5. Review the project management procedures and requirements to seek cost reductions, including the risk management strategy and the review and reporting process; 6. Review and possibly modify the cost caps for all Explorer classes to optimize scientific returns per dollar. [ABRIDGED]
  • The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a set of mission concepts for the next generation of UVOIR space observatory with a primary aperture diameter in the 8-m to 16-m range that will allow us to perform some of the most challenging observations to answer some of our most compelling questions, including "Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy?" We have identified two different telescope architectures, but with similar optical designs, that span the range in viable technologies. The architectures are a telescope with a monolithic primary mirror and two variations of a telescope with a large segmented primary mirror. This approach provides us with several pathways to realizing the mission, which will be narrowed to one as our technology development progresses. The concepts invoke heritage from HST and JWST design, but also take significant departures from these designs to minimize complexity, mass, or both. Our report provides details on the mission concepts, shows the extraordinary scientific progress they would enable, and describes the most important technology development items. These are the mirrors, the detectors, and the high-contrast imaging technologies, whether internal to the observatory, or using an external occulter. Experience with JWST has shown that determined competitors, motivated by the development contracts and flight opportunities of the new observatory, are capable of achieving huge advances in technical and operational performance while keeping construction costs on the same scale as prior great observatories.
  • We present the results of a comprehensive Spitzer survey of 69 radio galaxies across 1<z<5.2. Using IRAC (3.6-8.0um), IRS (16um) and MIPS (24-160um) imaging, we decompose the rest-frame optical to infrared spectral energy distributions into stellar, AGN, and dust components and determine the contribution of host galaxy stellar emission at rest-frame H-band. Stellar masses derived from rest-frame near-IR data, where AGN and young star contributions are minimized, are significantly more reliable than those derived from rest-frame optical and UV data. We find that the fraction of emitted light at rest-frame H-band from stars is >60% for ~75% the high redshift radio galaxies. As expected from unified models of AGN, the stellar fraction of the rest-frame H-band luminosity has no correlation with redshift, radio luminosity, or rest-frame mid-IR (5um) luminosity. Additionally, while the stellar H-band luminosity does not vary with stellar fraction, the total H-band luminosity anti-correlates with the stellar fraction as would be expected if the underlying hosts of these radio galaxies comprise a homogeneous population. The resultant stellar luminosities imply stellar masses of 10^{11-11.5}Msun even at the highest redshifts. Powerful radio galaxies tend to lie in a similar region of mid-IR color-color space as unobscured AGN, despite the stellar contribution to their mid-IR SEDs at shorter-wavelengths. The mid-IR luminosities alone classify most HzRGs as LIRGs or ULIRGs with even higher total-IR luminosities. As expected, these exceptionally high mid-IR luminosities are consistent with an obscured, highly-accreting AGN. We find a weak correlation of stellar mass with radio luminosity.