• We present a comparative study of molecular and ionized gas kinematics in nearby galaxies. These results are based on observations from the EDGE survey, which measured spatially resolved $^{12}$CO(J=1-0) in 126 nearby galaxies. Every galaxy in EDGE has corresponding resolved ionized gas measurements from CALIFA. Using a sub-sample of 17 rotation dominated, star-forming galaxies where precise molecular gas rotation curves could be extracted, we derive CO and H$\alpha$ rotation curves using the same geometric parameters out to $\gtrsim$1 $R_e$. We find that $\sim$75% of our sample galaxies have smaller ionized gas rotation velocities than the molecular gas in the outer part of the rotation curve. In no case is the molecular gas rotation velocity measurably lower than that of the ionized gas. We suggest that the lower ionized gas rotation velocity can be attributed to a significant contribution from extraplanar diffuse ionized gas in a thick, turbulence supported disk. Using observations of the H$\gamma$ transition also available from CALIFA, we measure ionized gas velocity dispersions and find that these galaxies have sufficiently large velocity dispersions to support a thick ionized gas disk. Kinematic simulations show that a thick disk with a vertical rotation velocity gradient can reproduce the observed differences between the CO and H$\alpha$ rotation velocities. Observed line ratios tracing diffuse ionized gas are elevated compared to typical values in the midplane of the Milky Way. In galaxies affected by this phenomenon, dynamical masses measured using ionized gas rotation curves will be systematically underestimated.
  • We are members of the Astrophysics Source Code Library's Advisory Committee and its editor-in-chief. The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL, ascl.net) is a successful initiative that advocates for open research software and provides an infrastructure for registering, discovering, sharing, and citing this software. Started in 1999, the ASCL has been expanding in recent years, with an average of over 200 codes added each year, and now houses over 1,600 code entries.
  • We present H13CO+ (J=1-0) and HNC (J=1-0) maps of regions in Serpens South, Serpens Main and NGC 1333 containing filaments. We also observe the Serpens regions using H13CN (J=1-0). These dense gas tracer molecular line observations carried out with CARMA have an angular resolution of ~7", a spectral resolution of ~0.16 km/s and a sensitivity of 50-100 mJy/beam. Although the large scale structure compares well with the Herschel dust continuum maps, we resolve finer structure within the filaments identified by Herschel. The H13CO+ emission distribution agrees with the existing CARMA N2H+ (J=1-0) maps; so they trace the same morphology and kinematics of the filaments. The H13CO+ maps additionally reveal that many regions have multiple structures partially overlapping in the line-of-sight. In two regions, the velocity differences are as high as 1.4 m/s. We identify 8 filamentary structures having typical widths of 0.03-0.08 pc in these tracers. At least 50% of the filamentary structures have distinct velocity gradients perpendicular to their major axis with average values in the range 4-10 km/s/pc. These findings are in support of the theoretical models of filament formation by 2-D inflow in the shock layer created by colliding turbulent cells. We also find evidence of velocity gradients along the length of two filamentary structures; the gradients suggest that these filaments are inflowing towards the cloud core.
  • We present interferometric CO observations made with the Combined Array for Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) of galaxies from the Extragalactic Database for Galaxy Evolution survey (EDGE). These galaxies are selected from the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) sample, mapped with optical integral field spectroscopy. EDGE provides good quality CO data (3$\sigma$ sensitivity $\Sigma_{\rm mol}$ $\sim$ 11 M$_\odot$ pc$^{-2}$ before inclination correction, resolution $\sim1.4$ kpc) for 126 galaxies, constituting the largest interferometric CO survey of galaxies in the nearby universe. We describe the survey, the data characteristics, the data products, and present initial science results. We find that the exponential scale-lengths of the molecular, stellar, and star-forming disks are approximately equal, and galaxies that are more compact in molecular gas than in stars tend to show signs of interaction. We characterize the molecular to stellar ratio as a function of Hubble type and stellar mass, present preliminary results on the resolved relations between the molecular gas, stars, and star formation rate, and discuss the dependence of the resolved molecular depletion time on stellar surface density, nebular extinction, and gas metallicity. EDGE provides a key dataset to address outstanding topics regarding gas and its role in star formation and galaxy evolution, which will be publicly available on completion of the quality assessment.
  • The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) is a free online registry of research codes; it is indexed by ADS and Web of Science and has over 1300 code entries. Its entries are increasingly used to cite software; citations have been doubling each year since 2012 and every major astronomy journal accepts citations to the ASCL. Codes in the resource cover all aspects of astrophysics research and many programming languages are represented. In the past year, the ASCL added dashboards for users and administrators, started minting Digital Objective Identifiers (DOIs) for software it houses, and added metadata fields requested by users. This presentation covers the ASCL's growth in the past year and the opportunities afforded it as one of the few domain libraries for science research codes.
  • Improving software citation and credit continues to be a topic of interest across and within many disciplines, with numerous efforts underway. In this Birds of a Feather (BoF) session, we started with a list of actionable ideas from last year's BoF and other similar efforts and worked alone or in small groups to begin implementing them. Work was captured in a common Google document; the session organizers will disseminate or otherwise put this information to use in or for the community in collaboration with those who contributed.
  • We present a 3 mm spectral line and continuum survey of L1451 in the Perseus Molecular Cloud. These observations are from the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy), which also imaged Barnard 1, NGC 1333, Serpens Main and Serpens South. L1451 is the survey region with the lowest level of star formation activity---it contains no confirmed protostars. HCO+, HCN, and N2H+ (J=1-0) are all detected throughout the region, with HCO+ the most spatially widespread, and molecular emission seen toward 90% of the area above N(H_2) column densities of 1.9x10^21 cm^-2. HCO+ has the broadest velocity dispersion, near 0.3 km/s on average, compared to ~0.15 km/s for the other molecules, thus representing a range from supersonic to subsonic gas motions. Our non-binary dendrogram analysis reveals that the dense gas traced by each molecule has similar hierarchical structure, and that gas surrounding the candidate first hydrostatic core (FHSC), L1451-mm, and other previously detected single-dish continuum clumps have similar hierarchical structure; this suggests that different sub-regions of L1451 are fragmenting on the pathway to forming young stars. We determined the three-dimensional morphology of the largest detectable dense gas structures to be relatively ellipsoidal compared to other CLASSy regions, which appeared more flattened at largest scales. A virial analysis shows the most centrally condensed dust structures are likely unstable against collapse. Additionally, we identify a new spherical, centrally condensed N2H+ feature that could be a new FHSC candidate. The overall results suggest L1451 is a young region starting to form its generation of stars within turbulent, hierarchical structures.
  • The past year has seen movement on several fronts for improving software citation, including the Center for Open Science's Transparency and Openness Promotion (TOP) Guidelines, the Software Publishing Special Interest Group that was started at January's AAS meeting in Seattle at the request of that organization's Working Group on Astronomical Software, a Sloan-sponsored meeting at GitHub in San Francisco to begin work on a cohesive research software citation-enabling platform, the work of Force11 to "transform and improve" research communication, and WSSSPE's ongoing efforts that include software publication, citation, credit, and sustainability. Brief reports on these efforts were shared at the BoF, after which participants discussed ideas for improving software citation, generating a list of recommendations to the community of software authors, journal publishers, ADS, and research authors. The discussion, recommendations, and feedback will help form recommendations for software citation to those publishers represented in the Software Publishing Special Interest Group and the broader community.
  • We describe a framework that allows a scientist-user to easily query for information across all Virtual Observatory (VO) repositories and pull it back for analysis. This framework hides the gory details of meta-data remediation and data formatting from the user, allowing them to get on with search, retrieval and analysis of VO data as if they were drawn from a single source using a science based terminology rather than a data-centric one.
  • We present observations of N2H+(1-0), HCO+(1-0), and HCN(1-0) toward the Serpens Main molecular cloud from the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy). We mapped 150 square arcminutes of Serpens Main with an angular resolution of 7 arcsecs. The gas emission is concentrated in two subclusters (the NW and SE subclusters). The SE subcluster has more prominent filamentary structures and more complicated kinematics compared to the NW subcluster. The majority of gas in the two subclusters has subsonic to sonic velocity dispersions. We applied a dendrogram technique with N2H+(1-0) to study the gas structures; the SE subcluster has a higher degree of hierarchy than the NW subcluster. Combining the dendrogram and line fitting analyses reveals two distinct relations: a flat relation between nonthermal velocity dispersion and size, and a positive correlation between variation in velocity centroids and size. The two relations imply a characteristic depth of 0.15 pc for the cloud. Furthermore, we have identified six filaments in the SE subcluster. These filaments have lengths of 0.2 pc and widths of 0.03 pc, which is smaller than a characteristic width of 0.1 pc suggested by Herschel observations. The filaments can be classified into two types based on their properties. The first type, located in the northeast of the SE subcluster, has larger velocity gradients, smaller masses, and nearly critical mass-per-unit-length ratios. The other type, located in the southwest of the SE subcluster, has the opposite properties. Several YSOs are formed along two filaments which have supercritical mass per unit length ratios, while filaments with nearly critical mass-per-unit-length ratios are not associated with YSOs, suggesting that stars are formed on gravitationally unstable filaments.
  • How do we as a community encourage the reuse of software for telescope operations, data processing, and calibration? How can we support making codes used in research available for others to examine? Continuing the discussion from last year Bring out your codes! BoF session, participants separated into groups to brainstorm ideas to mitigate factors which inhibit code sharing and nurture those which encourage code sharing. The BoF concluded with the sharing of ideas that arose from the brainstorming sessions and a brief summary by the moderator.
  • The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL, http://ascl.net/) is an online registry of over 700 source codes that are of interest to astrophysicists, with more being added regularly. The ASCL actively seeks out codes as well as accepting submissions from the code authors, and all entries are citable and indexed by ADS. All codes have been used to generate results published in or submitted to a refereed journal and are available either via a download site or froman identified source. In addition to being the largest directory of scientist-written astrophysics programs available, the ASCL is also an active participant in the reproducible research movement with presentations at various conferences, numerous blog posts and a journal article. This poster provides a description of the ASCL and the changes that we are starting to see in the astrophysics community as a result of the work we are doing.
  • The Astrophysics Source Code Library, started in 1999, has in the past three years grown from a repository for 40 codes to a registry of over 700 codes that are now indexed by ADS. What comes next? We examine the future of the ASCL, the challenges facing it, the rationale behind its practices, and the need to balance what we might do with what we have the resources to accomplish.
  • We examine the formation of clusters of galaxies in numerical simulations of a QUMOND cosmogony with massive sterile neutrinos. Clusters formed in these exploratory simulations develop higher velocities than those found in {\Lambda}CDM simulations. The bulk motions of clusters attain about 1000 km/s by low redshift, comparable to observations whereas {\Lambda}CDM simulated clusters tend to fall short. Similarly, high pairwise velocities are common in cluster-cluster collisions like the Bullet cluster. There is also a propensity for the most massive clusters to be larger in QUMOND and to appear earlier than in {\Lambda}CDM, potentially providing an explanation for 'pink elephants' like El Gordo. However, it is not obvious that the cluster mass function can be recovered.
  • Progress is being made in code discoverability and preservation, but as discussed at ADASS XXI, many codes still remain hidden from public view. With the Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) now indexed by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS), the introduction of a new journal, Astronomy & Computing, focused on astrophysics software, and the increasing success of education efforts such as Software Carpentry and SciCoder, the community has the opportunity to set a higher standard for its science by encouraging the release of software for examination and possible reuse. We assembled representatives of the community to present issues inhibiting code release and sought suggestions for tackling these factors. The session began with brief statements by panelists; the floor was then opened for discussion and ideas. Comments covered a diverse range of related topics and points of view, with apparent support for the propositions that algorithms should be readily available, code used to produce published scientific results should be made available, and there should be discovery mechanisms to allow these to be found easily. With increased use of resources such as GitHub (for code availability), ASCL (for code discovery), and a stated strong preference from the new journal Astronomy & Computing for code release, we expect to see additional progress over the next few years.
  • The isolation, simple apparent structure, and low luminosity of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 6503 make it an ideal candidate for an in-depth kinematic and photometric study. We introduce a new publicly available code, DiskFit, that implements procedures for fitting non-axisymmetries in either kinematic or photometric data. We use DiskFit to analyze new Halpha and CO velocity field data as well as HI kinematics from Greisen et al. to search for non-circular motions in the disc of NGC 6503. We find NGC 6503 to have remarkably regular gas kinematics that are well-described by rotation only. We also use DiskFit and a new Ks-band image of NGC 6503 to constrain photometric models of the disc, bar and bulge. We find the galaxy to be photometrically dominated by the disc. We find NGC 6503 to contain a faint bar and an exponential bulge which together contribute only ~5% of the total galaxy light. The combination of our kinematic and photometric DiskFit models suggest that NGC 6503 contains a weak, end-on bar that may have produced its Type II surface brightness profile but is unlikely to be responsible for its strong sigma-drop.
  • Much of scientific progress now hinges on the reliability, falsifiability and reproducibility of computer source codes. Astrophysics in particular is a discipline that today leads other sciences in making useful scientific components freely available online, including data, abstracts, preprints, and fully published papers, yet even today many astrophysics source codes remain hidden from public view. We review the importance and history of source codes in astrophysics and previous efforts to develop ways in which information about astrophysics codes can be shared. We also discuss why some scientist coders resist sharing or publishing their codes, the reasons for and importance of overcoming this resistance, and alert the community to a reworking of one of the first attempts for sharing codes, the Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL). We discuss the implementation of the ASCL in an accompanying poster paper. We suggest that code could be given a similar level of referencing as data gets in repositories such as ADS.
  • Here we describe the Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL), which takes an active approach to sharing astrophysical source code. ASCL's editor seeks out both new and old peer-reviewed papers that describe methods or experiments that involve the development or use of source code, and adds entries for the found codes to the library. This approach ensures that source codes are added without requiring authors to actively submit them, resulting in a comprehensive listing that covers a significant number of the astrophysics source codes used in peer-reviewed studies. The ASCL now has over 340 codes in it and continues to grow. In 2011, the ASCL (http://ascl.net) has on average added 19 new codes per month. An advisory committee has been established to provide input and guide the development and expansion of the new site, and a marketing plan has been developed and is being executed. All ASCL source codes have been used to generate results published in or submitted to a refereed journal and are freely available either via a download site or from an identified source. This paper provides the history and description of the ASCL. It lists the requirements for including codes, examines the benefits of the ASCL, and outlines some of its future plans.
  • Building on the "drPACS" contribution at ADASS XX of a simple Unix pipeline infrastructure, we implemented a pipeline toolkit using the package MIRIAD to combine Interferometric and Single Dish data (MIS). This was prompted by our observations made with the Combined Array For Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) interferometer of the star-forming region NGC 1333, a large survey highlighting the new 23-element and singledish observing modes. The project consists of 20 CARMA datasets each containing interferometric as well as simultaneously obtained single dish data, for 3 molecular spectral lines and continuum, in 527 different pointings, covering an area of about 8 by 11 arcminutes. A small group of collaborators then shared this toolkit and their parameters via CVS, and scripts were developed to ensure uniform data reduction across the group. The pipeline was run end-to-end each night as new observations were obtained, producing maps that contained all the data to date. We will show examples of the scripts and data products. This approach could serve as a model for repeated calibration and mapping of large mixed-mode correlation datasets from ALMA.
  • A new code for astrophysical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is described. The code has been designed to be easily extensible for use with static and adaptive mesh refinement. It combines higher-order Godunov methods with the constrained transport (CT) technique to enforce the divergence-free constraint on the magnetic field. Discretization is based on cell-centered volume-averages for mass, momentum, and energy, and face-centered area-averages for the magnetic field. Novel features of the algorithm include (1) a consistent framework for computing the time- and edge-averaged electric fields used by CT to evolve the magnetic field from the time- and area-averaged Godunov fluxes, (2) the extension to MHD of spatial reconstruction schemes that involve a dimensionally-split time advance, and (3) the extension to MHD of two different dimensionally-unsplit integration methods. Implementation of the algorithm in both C and Fortran95 is detailed, including strategies for parallelization using domain decomposition. Results from a test suite which includes problems in one-, two-, and three-dimensions for both hydrodynamics and MHD are given, not only to demonstrate the fidelity of the algorithms, but also to enable comparisons to other methods. The source code is freely available for download on the web.
  • We present maps of 14.4 deg^2 of the Ophiuchus dark clouds observed by the Spitzer Space Telescope Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS). These high quality maps depict both numerous point sources as well as extended dust emission within the star-forming and non-star-forming portions of these clouds. Using PSF-fitting photometry, we detect 5779 sources at 24 um and 81 sources at 70 um at the 10 sigma level of significance. Three hundred twenty-three candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) were identified according to their positions on the MIPS/2MASS K versus K$-$[24] color-magnitude diagrams as compared to 24 um detections in the SWIRE extragalactic survey. We find that more than half of the YSO candidates, and almost all the ones with protostellar Class I spectral energy distributions, are confined to the known cluster and aggregates.
  • We present maps of 7.78 square degrees of the Lupus molecular cloud complex at 24, 70, and $160\:\mu$m. They were made with the Spitzer Space Telescope's Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) instrument as part of the Spitzer Legacy Program, ``From Molecular Cores to Planet-Forming Disks'' (c2d). The maps cover three separate regions in Lupus, denoted I, III, and IV. We discuss the c2d pipeline and how our data processing differs from it. We compare source counts in the three regions with two other data sets and predicted star counts from the Wainscoat model. This comparison shows the contribution from background galaxies in Lupus I. We also create two color magnitude diagrams using the 2MASS and MIPS data. From these results, we can identify background galaxies and distinguish them from probable young stellar objects. The sources in our catalogs are classified based on their spectral energy distribution (SED) from 2MASS and Spitzer wavelengths to create a sample of young stellar object candidates. From 2MASS data, we create extinction maps for each region and note a strong corresponence between the extinction and the $160\:\mu$m emission. The masses we derived in each Lupus cloud from our extinction maps are compared to masses estimated from $^{13}$CO and C$^{18}$O and found to be similar to our extinction masses in some regions, but significantly different in others. Finally, based on our color-magnitude diagrams, we selected 12 of our reddest candidate young stellar objects for individual discussion. Five of the 12 appear to be newly-discovered YSOs.
  • We present IRAC (3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 micron) observations of the Chamaeleon II molecular cloud. The observed area covers about 1 square degree defined by $A_V >2$. Analysis of the data in the 2005 c2d catalogs reveals a small number of sources (40) with properties similar to those of young stellaror substellar objects (YSOs). The surface density of these YSO candidates is low, and contamination by background galaxies appears to be substantial, especially for sources classified as Class I or flat SED. We discuss this problem in some detail and conclude that very few of the candidate YSOs in early evolutionary stages are actually in the Cha II cloud. Using a refined set of criteria, we define a smaller, but more reliable, set of 24 YSO candidates.
  • We present Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the "evolved starless core" L1521F which reveal the presence of a very low luminosity object (L < 0.07 Lsun). The object, L1521F-IRS, is directly detected at mid-infrared wavelengths (>5 micron) but only in scattered light at shorter infrared wavelengths, showing a bipolar nebula oriented east-west which is probably tracing an outflow cavity. The nebula strongly suggests that L1521F-IRS is embedded in the L1521F core. Thus L1521F-IRS is similar to the recently discovered L1014-IRS and the previously known IRAM 04191 in its substellar luminosity and dense core environment. However these objects differ significantly in their core density, core chemistry, and outflow properties, and some may be destined to be brown dwarfs rather than stars.
  • April 27, 2002 astro-ph
    Two dimensional velocity fields have been an important tool for nearly 30 years and are instrumental in understanding galactic mass distributions and deviations from an ideal galactic disk. Recently a number of new instruments have started to produce more detailed velocity fields of the disks and nuclear regions of galaxies. This paper summarizes some of the underlying techniques for constructing velocity fields and deriving rotation curves. It also urges to simulate observations from the data-cube stage to reject subtle biases in derived quantities such as rotation curves.