• In particle-based simulations, neighbour finding (i.e finding pairs of particles to interact within a given range) is the most time consuming part of the computation. One of the best such algorithms, which can be used for both Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations, is the pseudo-Verlet list algorithm. This algorithm, however, does not vectorise trivially, and hence makes it difficult to exploit SIMD-parallel architectures. In this paper, we present several novel modifications as well as a vectorisation strategy for the algorithm which lead to overall speed-ups over the scalar version of the algorithm of 2.24x for the AVX instruction set (SIMD width of 8), 2.43x for AVX2, and 4.07x for AVX-512 (SIMD width of 16).
  • We present a new 3D map of interstellar dust reddening, covering three quarters of the sky (declinations greater than -30 degrees) out to a distance of several kiloparsecs. The map is based on high-quality stellar photometry of 800 million stars from Pan-STARRS 1 and 2MASS. We divide the sky into sightlines containing a few hundred stars each, and then infer stellar distances and types, along with the line-of-sight dust distribution. Our new map incorporates a more accurate average extinction law and an additional 1.5 years of Pan-STARRS 1 data, tracing dust to greater extinctions and at higher angular resolutions than our previous map. Out of the plane of the Galaxy, our map agrees well with 2D reddening maps derived from far-infrared dust emission. After accounting for a 15% difference in scale, we find a mean scatter of 10% between our map and the Planck far-infrared emission-based dust map, out to a depth of 0.8 mag in E(r-z), with the level of agreement varying over the sky. Our map can be downloaded at http://argonaut.skymaps.info, or by its DOI: 10.7910/DVN/LCYHJG.
  • RR Lyrae stars may be the best practical tracers of Galactic halo (sub-)structure and kinematics. The PanSTARRS1 (PS1) $3\pi$ survey offers multi-band, multi-epoch, precise photometry across much of the sky, but a robust identification of RR Lyrae stars in this data set poses a challenge, given PS1's sparse, asynchronous multi-band light curves ($\lesssim 12$ epochs in each of five bands, taken over a 4.5-year period). We present a novel template fitting technique that uses well-defined and physically motivated multi-band light curves of RR Lyrae stars, and demonstrate that we get accurate period estimates, precise to 2~sec in $>80\%$ of cases. We augment these light curve fits with other {\em features} from photometric time-series and provide them to progressively more detailed machine-learned classification models. From these models we are able to select the widest ($3/4$ of the sky) and deepest (reaching 120 kpc) sample of RR Lyrae stars to date. The PS1 sample of $\sim 45,000$ RRab stars is pure (90\%), and complete (80\% at 80 kpc) at high galactic latitudes. It also provides distances precise to 3\%, measured with newly derived period-luminosity relations for optical/near-infrared PS1 bands. With the addition of proper motions from {\em Gaia} and radial velocity measurements from multi-object spectroscopic surveys, we expect the PS1 sample of RR Lyrae stars to become the premier source for studying the structure, kinematics, and the gravitational potential of the Galactic halo. The techniques presented in this study should translate well to other sparse, multi-band data sets, such as those produced by the Dark Energy Survey and the upcoming Large Synoptic Survey Telescope Galactic plane sub-survey.
  • We present a panoramic map of the entire Milky Way halo north of dec~-30 degrees (~30,000 deg^2), constructed by applying the matched-filter technique to the Pan-STARRS1 3Pi Survey dataset. Using single-epoch photometry reaching to g~22, we are sensitive to stellar substructures with heliocentric distances between 3.5 and ~35 kpc. We recover almost all previously-reported streams in this volume and demonstrate that several of these are significantly more extended than earlier datasets have indicated. In addition, we also report five new candidate stellar streams. One of these features appears significantly broader and more luminous than the others and is likely the remnant of a dwarf galaxy. The other four streams are consistent with a globular cluster origin, and three of these are rather short in projection (<10 degrees), suggesting that streams like Ophiuchus may not be that rare. Finally, a significant number of more marginal substructures are also revealed by our analysis; many of these features can also be discerned in matched-filter maps produced by other authors from SDSS data, and hence they are very likely to be genuine. However, the extant 3Pi data is currently too shallow to determine their properties or produce convincing CMDs. The global view of the Milky Way provided by Pan-STARRS1 provides further evidence for the important role of both globular cluster disruption and dwarf galaxy accretion in building the Milky Way's stellar halo.
  • Using the Pan-STARRS1 survey, we derive limiting magnitude, spatial completeness and density maps that we use to probe the three dimensional structure and estimate the stellar mass of the so-called Monoceros Ring. The Monoceros Ring is an enormous and complex stellar sub-structure in the outer Milky Way disk. It is most visible across the large Galactic Anticenter region, 120 < l < 240 degrees, -30 < b < +40 degrees. We estimate its stellar mass density profile along every line of sight in 2 X 2 degree pixels over the entire 30,000 square degree Pan-STARRS1 survey using the previously developed MATCH software. By parsing this distribution into a radially smooth component and the Monoceros Ring, we obtain its mass and distance from the Sun along each relevant line of sight. The Monoceros Ring is significantly closer to us in the South (6 kpc) than in the North (9 kpc). We also create 2D cross sections parallel to the Galactic plane that show 135 degrees of the Monoceros Ring in the South and 170 degrees of the Monoceros Ring in the North. We show that the Northern and Southern structures are also roughly concentric circles, suggesting that they may be a wave rippling from a common origin. Excluding the Galactic plane, we observe an excess stellar mass of 4 million solar masses across 120 < l < 240 degrees. If we interpolate across the Galactic plane, we estimate that this region contains 8 million solar masses. If we assume (somewhat boldly) that the Monoceros Ring is a set of two Galactocentric rings, its total stellar mass is 60 million solar masses. Finally, if we assume that it is a set of two circles centered at a point 4 kpc from the Galactic center in the anti-central direction, as our data suggests, we estimate its stellar mass to be 40 million solar masses.
  • We present a recalibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry with new flat fields and zero points derived from Pan-STARRS1 (PS1). Using PSF photometry of 60 million stars with $16 < r < 20$, we derive a model of amplifier gain and flat-field corrections with per-run RMS residuals of 3 millimagnitudes (mmag) in $griz$ bands and 15 mmag in $u$ band. The new photometric zero points are adjusted to leave the median in the Galactic North unchanged for compatibility with previous SDSS work. We also identify transient non-photometric periods in SDSS ("contrails") based on photometric deviations co-temporal in SDSS bands. The recalibrated stellar PSF photometry of SDSS and PS1 has an RMS difference of {9,7,7,8} mmag in $griz$, respectively, when averaged over $15'$ regions.
  • We present the discovery of three new Milky Way satellites from our search for compact stellar overdensities in the photometric catalog of the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 (Pan-STARRS 1, or PS1) 3pi survey. The first satellite, Laevens 3, is located at a heliocentric distance of d=67+/-3 kpc. With a total magnitude of Mv=-4.4+/-0.3 and a half-light radius rh=7+/-2 pc, its properties resemble those of outer halo globular clusters. The second system, Draco II/Laevens 4 (Dra II), is a closer and fainter satellite (d~20 kpc, Mv =-2.9+/-0.8), whose uncertain size (rh = 19 +8/-6 pc) renders its classification difficult without kinematic information; it could either be a faint and extended globular cluster or a faint and compact dwarf galaxy. The third satellite, Sagittarius II/Laevens 5 (Sgr II), has an ambiguous nature as it is either the most compact dwarf galaxy or the most extended globular cluster in its luminosity range (rh = 37 +9/-8 pc and Mv=-5.2+/-0.4). At a heliocentric distance of 67+/-5 kpc, this satellite lies intriguingly close to the expected location of the trailing arm of the Sagittarius stellar stream behind the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy (Sgr dSph). If confirmed through spectroscopic follow up, this connection would locate this part of the trailing arm of the Sagittarius stellar stream that has so far gone undetected. It would further suggest that Sgr II was brought into the Milky Way halo as a satellite of the Sgr dSph.
  • We present a three-dimensional map of interstellar dust reddening, covering three-quarters of the sky out to a distance of several kiloparsecs, based on Pan-STARRS 1 and 2MASS photometry. The map reveals a wealth of detailed structure, from filaments to large cloud complexes. The map has a hybrid angular resolution, with most of the map at an angular resolution of 3.4' to 13.7', and a maximum distance resolution of ~25%. The three-dimensional distribution of dust is determined in a fully probabilistic framework, yielding the uncertainty in the reddening distribution along each line of sight, as well as stellar distances, reddenings and classifications for 800 million stars detected by Pan-STARRS 1. We demonstrate the consistency of our reddening estimates with those of two-dimensional emission-based maps of dust reddening. In particular, we find agreement with the Planck 353 GHz optical depth-based reddening map to within 0.05 mag in E(B-V) to a depth of 0.5 mag, and explore systematics at reddenings less than E(B-V) ~ 0.08 mag. We validate our per-star reddening estimates by comparison with reddening estimates for stars with both SDSS photometry and SEGUE spectral classifications, finding per-star agreement to within 0.1 mag out to a stellar E(B-V) of 1 mag. We compare our map to two existing three-dimensional dust maps, by Marshall et al. (2006) and Lallement et al. (2013), demonstrating our finer angular resolution, and better distance resolution compared to the former within ~3 kpc. The map can be queried or downloaded at http://argonaut.skymaps.info. We expect the three-dimensional reddening map presented here to find a wide range of uses, among them correcting for reddening and extinction for objects embedded in the plane of the Galaxy, studies of Galactic structure, calibration of future emission-based dust maps and determining distances to objects of known reddening.
  • We present the selection algorithm and anticipated results for the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS). TDSS is an SDSS-IV eBOSS subproject that will provide initial identification spectra of approximately 220,000 luminosity-variable objects (variable stars and AGN) across 7,500 square degrees selected from a combination of SDSS and multi-epoch Pan-STARRS1 photometry. TDSS will be the largest spectroscopic survey to explicitly target variable objects, avoiding pre-selection on the basis of colors or detailed modeling of specific variability characteristics. Kernel Density Estimate (KDE) analysis of our target population performed on SDSS Stripe 82 data suggests our target sample will be 95% pure (meaning 95% of objects we select have genuine luminosity variability of a few magnitudes or more). Our final spectroscopic sample will contain roughly 135,000 quasars and 85,000 stellar variables, approximately 4,000 of which will be RR Lyrae stars which may be used as outer Milky Way probes. The variability-selected quasar population has a smoother redshift distribution than a color-selected sample, and variability measurements similar to those we develop here may be used to make more uniform quasar samples in large surveys. The stellar variable targets are distributed fairly uniformly across color space, indicating that TDSS will obtain spectra for a wide variety of stellar variables including pulsating variables, stars with significant chromospheric activity, cataclysmic variables and eclipsing binaries. TDSS will serve as a pathfinder mission to identify and characterize the multitude of variable objects that will be detected photometrically in even larger variability surveys such as LSST.
  • We use the WISE-2MASS infrared galaxy catalog matched with Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) galaxies to search for a supervoid in the direction of the Cosmic Microwave Background Cold Spot. Our imaging catalog has median redshift $z\simeq 0.14$, and we obtain photometric redshifts from PS1 optical colours to create a tomographic map of the galaxy distribution. The radial profile centred on the Cold Spot shows a large low density region, extending over 10's of degrees. Motivated by previous Cosmic Microwave Background results, we test for underdensities within two angular radii, $5^\circ$, and $15^\circ$. The counts in photometric redshift bins show significantly low densities at high detection significance, $\gtrsim 5 \sigma$ and $\gtrsim 6 \sigma$, respectively, for the two fiducial radii. The line-of-sight position of the deepest region of the void is $z\simeq 0.15-0.25$. Our data, combined with an earlier measurement by Granett et al. 2010, are consistent with a large $R_{\rm void}=(220 \pm 50) h^{-1}Mpc $ supervoid with $\delta_{m} \simeq -0.14 \pm 0.04$ centered at $z=0.22\pm0.03$. Such a supervoid, constituting at least a $\simeq 3.3\sigma$ fluctuation in a Gaussian distribution of the $\Lambda CDM$ model, is a plausible cause for the Cold Spot.
  • The extensible N-Dimensional Data Format (NDF) was designed and developed in the late 1980s to provide a data model suitable for use in a variety of astronomy data processing applications supported by the UK Starlink Project. Starlink applications were used extensively, primarily in the UK astronomical community, and form the basis of a number of advanced data reduction pipelines today. This paper provides an overview of the historical drivers for the development of NDF and the lessons learned from using a defined hierarchical data model for many years in data reduction software, data pipelines and in data acquisition systems.
  • SPLAT-VO is a powerful graphical tool for displaying, comparing, modifying and analyzing astronomical spectra, as well as searching and retrieving spectra from services around the world using Virtual Observatory (VO) protocols and services. The development of SPLAT-VO started in 1999, as part of the Starlink StarJava initiative, sometime before that of the VO, so initial support for the VO was necessarily added once VO standards and services became available. Further developments were supported by the Joint Astronomy Centre, Hawaii until 2009. Since end of 2011 development of SPLAT-VO has been continued by the German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory, and the Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. From this time several new features have been added, including support for the latest VO protocols, along with new visualization and spectra storing capabilities. This paper presents the history of SPLAT-VO, it's capabilities, recent additions and future plans, as well as a discussion on the motivations and lessons learned up to now.
  • We use a WISE-2MASS-Pan-STARRS1 galaxy catalog to search for a supervoid in the direction of the Cosmic Microwave Background Cold Spot. We obtain photometric redshifts using our multicolor data set to create a tomographic map of the galaxy distribution. The radial density profile centred on the Cold Spot shows a large low density region, extending over 10's of degrees. Motivated by previous Cosmic Microwave Background results, we test for underdensities within two angular radii, $5^\circ$, and $15^\circ$. Our data, combined with an earlier measurement by Granett et al 2010, are consistent with a large $R_{\rm void}=(192 \pm 15)h^{-1} Mpc $ $(2\sigma)$ supervoid with $\delta \simeq -0.13 \pm 0.03$ centered at $z=0.22\pm0.01$. Such a supervoid, constituting a $\sim3.5 \sigma$ fluctuation in the $\Lambda CDM$ model, is a plausible cause for the Cold Spot.
  • We present a panoptic view of the stellar structure in the Galactic disk's outer reaches commonly known as the Monoceros Ring, based on data from Pan-STARRS1. These observations clearly show the large extent of the stellar overdensities on both sides of the Galactic disk, extending between b = -25 and b = +35 degrees and covering over 130 degrees in Galactic longitude. The structure exhibits a complex morphology with both stream-like features and a sharp edge to the structure in both the north and the south. We compare this map to mock observations of two published simulations aimed at explaining such structures in the outer stellar disk, one postulating an origin as a tidal stream and the other demonstrating a scenario where the disk is strongly distorted by the accretion of a satellite. These morphological comparisons of simulations can link formation scenarios to observed structures, such as demonstrating that the distorted-disk model can produce thin density features resembling tidal streams. Although neither model produces perfect agreement with the observations--the tidal stream predicts material at larger distances which is not detected while in the distorted disk model the midplane is warped to an excessive degree--future tuning of the models to accommodate these latest data may yield better agreement.
  • Standard inflationary hot big bang cosmology predicts small fluctuations in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) with isotropic Gaussian statistics. All measurements support the standard theory, except for a few anomalies discovered in the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe maps and confirmed recently by the Planck satellite. The Cold Spot is one of the most significant of such anomalies, and the leading explanation of it posits a large void that imprints this extremely cold area via the linear Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect due to the decay of gravitational potentials over cosmic time, or via the Rees-Sciama (RS) effect due to late-time non-linear evolution. Despite several observational campaigns targeting the Cold Spot region, to date no suitably large void was found at higher redshifts $z > 0.3$. Here we report the detection of an $R =(192 \pm 15) h^{-1}Mpc$ size supervoid of depth $\delta = -0.13 \pm 0.03$, and centred at redshift $z = 0.22$. This supervoid, possibly the largest ever found, is large enough to significantly affect the CMB via the non-linear RS effect, as shown in our Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi framework. This discovery presents the first plausible explanation for any of the physical CMB anomalies, and raises the possibility that local large-scale structure could be responsible for other anomalies as well.
  • We report the discovery of a thin stellar stream found in Pan-STARRS1 photometry near the Galactic bulge in the constellation of Ophiuchus. It appears as a coherent structure in the colour-selected stellar density maps produced to search for tidal debris around nearby globular clusters. The stream is exceptionally short and narrow; it is about 2.5{\deg} long and 6' wide in projection. The colour-magnitude diagram of this object, which harbours a blue horizontal-branch, is consistent with an old and relatively metal-poor population ([Fe/H]~-1.3) located 9.5 +/- 0.9 kpc away at (l,b) ~ (5{\deg},+32{\deg}), and 5.0 +/- 1.0 kpc from the Galactic centre. These properties argue for a globular cluster as progenitor. The finding of such a prominent, nearby stream suggests that many streams could await discovery in the more densely populated regions of our Galaxy.
  • We present the fiducial sequences of a sample of Galactic star clusters in the five bands of the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) photometric system (g_P1, r_P1, i_P1, z_P1, y_P1). These empirical sequences -- which include the red giant and sub-giant branches, the main sequence, and the horizontal branch -- were defined from deep colour-magnitude diagrams reaching below the oldest main-sequence turn-offs of 13 globular and 3 old open clusters covering a wide range of metallicities (-2.4 < [Fe/H] < +0.4). We find excellent agreement for the nine clusters in common with previous studies in similar photometric systems when transformed to the PS1 system. Because the photometric and spectroscopic properties of these stellar populations are accurately known, the fiducials provide a solid basis for the interpretation of observations in the PS1 system, as well as valuable constraints to improve the empirical colour--$T_{eff}$ relations.
  • We present a new satellite in the outer halo of the Galaxy, the first Milky Way satellite found in the stacked photometric catalog of the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 (Pan-STARRS1) Survey. From follow-up photometry obtained with WFI on the MPG/ESO 2.2m telescope, we argue that the object, located at a heliocentric distance of 145+/-17 kpc, is the most distant Milky Way globular cluster yet known. With a total magnitude of M_V=-4.3+/-0.2 and a half-light radius of 20+/-2 pc, it shares the properties of extended globular clusters found in the outer halo of our Galaxy and the Andromeda galaxy. The discovery of this distant cluster shows that the full spatial extent of the Milky Way globular cluster system has not yet been fully explored.
  • We present a method to infer reddenings and distances to stars, based only on their broad-band photometry, and show how this method can be used to produce a three-dimensional dust map of the Galaxy. Our method samples from the full probability density function of distance, reddening and stellar type for individual stars, as well as the full uncertainty in reddening as a function of distance in the 3D dust map. We incorporate prior knowledge of the distribution of stars in the Galaxy and the detection limits of the survey. For stars in the Pan-STARRS 1 (PS1) 3 pi survey, we demonstrate that our reddening estimates are unbiased, and accurate to ~0.13 mag in E(B-V) for the typical star. Based on comparisons with mock catalogs, we expect distances for main-sequence stars to be constrained to within ~20% - 60%, although this range can vary, depending on the reddening of the star, the precise stellar type and its position on the sky. A further paper will present a 3D map of dust over the three quarters of the sky surveyed by PS1. Both the individual stellar inferences and the 3D dust map will enable a wealth of Galactic science in the plane. The method we present is not limited to the passbands of the PS1 survey, but may be extended to incorporate photometry from other surveys, such as 2MASS, SDSS (where available), and in the future, LSST and Gaia.
  • We present the discovery of a new dwarf galaxy, Perseus I/Andromeda XXXIII, found in the vicinity of Andromeda (M31) in stacked imaging data from the Pan-STARRS1 3{\pi} survey. Located 27.9{\deg} away from M31, Perseus I has a heliocentric distance of 785 +/- 65 kpc, compatible with it being a satellite of M31 at 374 +14/-10 kpc from its host. The properties of Perseus I are typical for a reasonably bright dwarf galaxy (M_V = -10.3 +/- 0.7), with an exponential half-light radius of r_h = 1.7 +/- 0.4 arcminutes or r_h = 400 +105/-85 pc at this distance, and a moderate ellipticity (\epsilon = 0.43 +0.15/-0.17). The late discovery of Perseus I is due to its fairly low surface brightness (\mu_0=25.7 +1.0/-0.9 mag/arcsec^2), and to the previous lack of deep, high quality photometric data in this region. If confirmed to be a companion of M31, the location of Perseus I, far east from its host, could place interesting constraints on the bulk motion of the satellite system of M31.