• Only five binary systems have been found to emit at TeV energies. Each of these systems is composed of a massive O or B type star and a compact object (black hole or a pulsar). The type of compact object and the origin of the gamma-ray emission is unknown for most of these systems. Extending spectral observations to higher energies can help disentangle the nature of the compact object as well as the particle acceleration mechanisms present. Interestingly, the TeV emission from these systems does not always coincide with their emission in GeV or X-ray, which is how many such systems have been originally discovered. Increased coverage of these systems may allow HAWC to see precisely when in the orbit the TeV emission begins and ends. The HAWC Observatory detects TeV gamma-rays with high sensitivity, covering over two-thirds of the overhead sky every day. Applying a stacking method to known TeV binary systems can help HAWC enhance the signal from TeV binaries above the steady background from other sources in the galaxy. We will present results from this stacking analysis using 760 days of HAWC data.
  • The Cygnus arm of our galaxy is a source-rich and complex region hosting multiple gamma-ray source types such as pulsar wind nebulae (PWN), supernova remnants, binary systems, and star clusters. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory has been collecting data continuously since 2015 and has reported five sources within the Cygnus region. Several other instruments have also observed gamma-ray sources in this region. For instance, Fermi-LAT found gamma-ray emission at GeV energies due to a Cocoon of freshly accelerated cosmic rays, which is co-located with a known PWN TeV 2032+4130 seen by several TeV gamma-ray observatories. TeV J2032+4130 is likely powered by the pulsar PSR J2032+4127 based on the multi-wavelength observation and asymmetric morphology reported by VERITAS. The study of HAWC data will provide more information regarding the morphology, emission origin, and the correlation with the GeV emission. This presentation will discuss the analysis of data collected with the HAWC instrument and the Fermi-LAT and the results obtained to provide a deeper understanding of the Cygnus Cocoon across five decades of energy range.
  • Gamma-ray emission from large structures is useful for tracing the propagation and distribution of cosmic rays throughout our Galaxy. For example, the search for gamma-ray emission from Giant Molecular Clouds may allow us to probe the flux of cosmic rays in distant galactic regions and to compare it with the flux measured at Earth. Also, the composition of the cosmic rays can be measured by separating the gamma-ray emission from hadronic or leptonic processes. In the case of emission from the Fermi Bubbles specifically, constraining the mechanism of gamma-ray production can point to their origin. HAWC possesses a large field of view and good sensitivity to spatially extended sources, which currently makes it the best suited ground-based observatory to detect extended regions. We will present preliminary results on the search of gamma-ray emission from Molecular Clouds, as well as upper limits on the differential flux from the Fermi Bubbles.
  • Studying gamma-ray emission by Galactic objects is key to understanding the origins and acceleration mechanisms of Galactic cosmic ray electrons and hadrons. The HAWC observatory provides an unprecedented view of the gamma-ray sky at TeV energies and is particularly suited for the study of Galactic objects. However, the interpretation of the measured data poses several challenges. The high density of sources and source candidates can cause source confusion and make it harder to disentangle the origin of the emission. The relatively low angular resolution of HAWC, compared to instruments in optical or radio wavelengths, can further cause the emission of neighboring sources to bleed into each other or even make them look like one extended source. On the other hand, with its wide field of view, HAWC is uniquely suited for the study of extended sources. However, this requires the simultaneous modeling of both their morphology and emission spectrum. Joint likelihood fits to data taken over a larger range of energies can help overcome these challenges and achieve the full potential of the HAWC detector. In this presentation, we will discuss how systematic uncertainties related to joint likelihood fits can affect the measurements.
  • The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Experiment is a second-generation highsensitivity gamma-ray and cosmic-ray detector that builds on the experience and technology of the Milagro observatory. Like Milagro, HAWC utilizes the water Cherenkov technique to measure extensive air showers. Instead of a pond filled with water (as in Milagro) an array of closely packed water tanks is used. The event direction will be reconstructed using the times when the PMTs in each tank are triggered. Therefore, the timing calibration will be crucial for reaching an angular resolution as low as 0.25 degrees.We propose to use a laser calibration system, patterned after the calibration system in Milagro. Like Milagro, the HAWC optical calibration system will use ~1 ns laser light pulses. Unlike Milagro, the PMTs are optically isolated and require their own optical fiber calibration. For HAWC the laser light pulses will be directed through a series of optical fan-outs and fibers to illuminate the PMTs in approximately one half of the tanks on any given pulse. Time slewing corrections will be made using neutraldensity filters to control the light intensity over 4 orders of magnitude. This system is envisioned to run continuously at a low rate and will be controlled remotely. In this paper, we present the design of the calibration system and first measurements of its performance.