• We present a study of the stellar populations within the central regions of four nearby barred galaxies, and use a novel technique to constrain the duration of bar activity. We focus on the star formation 'desert', a region within each of these galaxies where star formation appears to have been suppressed by the bar. New H beta spectroscopic data are presented, and used to produce spectroscopic line indices which are compared with theoretical predictions from population synthesis models for simple stellar populations and temporally truncated star formation histories. This analysis shows that the dearth of star formation activity in these regions appears to have been continuing for at least 1 Gyr, with timescales of several Gyr indicated for two of the galaxies. This favours models in which strong bars can be long-lived features of galaxies, but our results also indicate a significant diversity in stellar population ages, and hence in the implied histories of bar activity in these four galaxies.
  • We present new results on the evolution of the cosmic star formation rate as a function of stellar mass in the SXDS-UDS field. We make use of narrow-band selected emission line galaxies in four redshift slices between z = 1.46 and z = 0.63, and compute stellar masses by fitting a series of templates to recreate each galaxy's star formation history. We determine mass-binned luminosity functions in each redshift slice, and derive the star formation rate density (rhoSFR) as a function of mass using the [OIII] or [OII] emission lines. We calculate dust extinction and metallicity as a function of stellar mass, and investigate the effect of these corrections on the shape of the overall rhoSFR(M). We find that both these corrections are crucial for determining the shape of the rhoSFR(M), and its evolution with redshift. The fully corrected rhoSFR(M) is a relatively flat distribution, with the normalisation moving towards lower values of rhoSFR with increasing cosmic time/decreasing redshift, and requiring star formation to be truncated across all masses studied here. The peak of rhoSFR(M) is found in the 10^10.5<Msun<10^11.0 mass bin at z = 1.46. In the lower redshift slices the location of the peak is less certain, however low mass galaxies in the range 10^7.0<Msun<10^8.0 play an important part in the overall rhoSFR(M) out to at least z ~ 1.2.
  • We present an analysis of the optical line emission from nearby barred galaxies, and in particular look at the radial range occupied by the bar. In many cases this region is marked by what we term a 'star formation desert', with a marked deficit of HII regions in optical narrow-band H-alpha imaging. Here we present long-slit spectroscopy revealing that such regions do have line emission, but that it is low-level, spatially smooth and almost ubiquitous. The relative strengths of the H-alpha and the spectrally adjacent [NII] lines in the regions are completely discrepant from those associated with star formation regions, and more closely match expectations for 'LINER' regions. We quantify the total line emission from these extended, kpc-scale regions, and determine the spurious contribution it would make to the determined star formation rate of these galaxies if interpreted as normal H-alpha emission. We concur with previous studies that link this LINER emission to old stellar populations, e.g. post-asymptotic giant branch stars, and propose these strongly-barred early-type spirals as a prime location for further tests of such emission.
  • Investigations of the environments of SNe allow statistical constraints to be made on progenitor properties. We review progress that has been made in this field. Pixel statistics using tracers of e.g. star formation within galaxies show differences in the explosion sites of, in particular SNe types II and Ibc (SNe II and SNe Ibc), suggesting differences in population ages. Of particular interest is that SNe Ic are significantly more associated with H-alpha emission than SNe Ib, implying shorter lifetimes for the former. In addition, such studies have shown that the interacting SNe IIn do not explode in regions containing the most massive stars, which suggests that at least a significant fraction of their progenitors arise from the lower end of the core-collapse SN mass range. Host HII region spectroscopy has been obtained for a significant number of core-collapse events, however definitive conclusions have to-date been elusive. Single stellar evolution models predict that the fraction of SNe Ibc to SNe II should increase with increasing metallicity, due to the dependence of mass-loss rates on progenitor metallicity. We present a meta-analysis of host HII region oxygen abundances for CC SNe. It is concluded that the SN II to SN Ibc ratio shows little variation with oxygen abundance, with only a suggestion that the ratio increases in the lowest bin. Radial distributions of different SNe are discussed, where a central excess of SNe Ibc has been observed within disturbed galaxy systems, which is difficult to ascribe to metallicity or selection effects. Environment studies are evolving to enable studies at higher spatial resolutions than previously possible, while in addition the advent of wide-field integral field unit instruments allows galaxy-wide spectral analyses which will provide fruitful results to this field. Some example contemporary results are shown in that direction.
  • We present new results on the cosmic star formation history in the SXDS-UDS field out to z=1.6. We compile narrow-band data from the Subaru Telescope and the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) in conjunction with broad-band data from the SXDS and UDS, to make a selection of 5725 emission-line galaxies in 12 redshift slices, spanning 10 Gyr of cosmic time. We determine photometric redshifts for the sample using 11-band photometry, and use a spectroscopically confirmed subset to fine tune the resultant redshift distribution. We use the maximum-likelihood technique to determine luminosity functions in each redshift slice and model the selection effects inherent in any narrow-band selection statistically, to obviate the retrospective corrections ordinarily required. The deep narrow-band data are sensitive to very low star formation rates (SFRs), and allow an accurate evaluation of the faint end slope of the Schechter function, alpha. We find that alpha is particularly sensitive to the assumed faintest broadband magnitude of a galaxy capable of hosting an emission line, and propose that this limit should be empirically motivated. For this analysis we base our threshold on the limiting observed equivalent widths of emission lines in the local Universe. We compute the characteristic SFR of galaxies in each redshift slice, and the integrated SFR density, rho_{SFR}. We find our results to be in good agreement with the literature and parametrize the evolution of the SFR density as rho_{SFR} proportional to (1 + z)^{4.58} confirming a steep decline in star formation activity since z = 1.6.
  • We present an observational study of the Type IIn supernovae (SNe IIn) 2005ip and 2006jd. Broad-band UV, optical and near-IR photometry, and visual-wavelength spectroscopy of SN 2005ip complement and extend upon published observations to 6.5 years past discovery. Our observations of SN 2006jd extend from UV to mid-infrared wavelengths, and like SN 2005ip, are compared to reported X-ray measurements to understand the nature of the progenitor. Both objects display a number of similarities with the 1988Z-like subclass of SN IIn including: (i) remarkably similar early- and late-phase optical spectra, (ii) a variety of high ionization coronal lines, (iii) long-duration optical and near-IR emission and, (iv) evidence of cold and warm dust components. However, diversity is apparent including an unprecedented late-time r-band excess in SN 2006jd.The observed differences are attributed to differences between the mass-loss history of the progenitor stars. We conclude that the progenitor of SN 2006jd likely experienced a significant mass-loss event during its pre-SN evolution akin to the great 19th century eruption of \eta Carinae. Contrarily, as advocated by Smith et al. (2009), we find the circumstellar environment of SN 2005ip to be more consistent with a clumpy wind progenitor.
  • The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) is an optical wide-field variability survey carried out using a camera with a 7.8 square degree field of view mounted on the 48-in Oschin Schmidt telescope at Palomar Observatory. One of the key goals of this survey is to conduct high-cadence monitoring of the sky in order to detect optical transient sources shortly after they occur. Here, we describe the real-time capabilities of the PTF and our related rapid multiwavelength follow-up programs, extending from the radio to the gamma-ray bands. We present as a case study observations of the optical transient PTF10vdl (SN 2010id), revealed to be a very young core-collapse (Type II-P) supernova having a remarkably low luminosity. Our results demonstrate that the PTF now provides for optical transients the real-time discovery and rapid-response follow-up capabilities previously reserved only for high-energy transients like gamma-ray bursts.
  • The supernova SN 2005cz has recently attracted some attention, due to the fact that it was spectroscopically similar to type Ib supernovae (SNe), a class that is presumed to result from core-collapse of massive stars, yet it occurred in an elliptical galaxy, where one expects very few massive stars to exist. Two explanations for this remarkable event were put forward. Perets et al. (2010) associate SN 2005cz with the class of Ca-rich, faint SNe Ib, which likely result from old double-white-dwarf systems with a He-rich secondary. On the other hand, Kawabata et al. (2010) suggest that SN 2005cz is indeed a core-collapse event (in a binary system), albeit of a star at the lower end of the mass range, 10-12 M_Sun. The existence of this star in its elliptical host is explained as resulting from low-level star formation (SF) activity in that galaxy. Here we present extensive observations of the location of SN 2005cz, sensitive to a variety of SF tracers, including optical spectroscopy, H_alpha emission, UV emission and HST photometry. We show that NGC 4589, the host galaxy of SN 2005cz, does not show any signatures of a young stellar population or recent SF activity either close to or far from the location of SN 2005cz.
  • We have used H alpha narrow-band imaging to search for star-forming satellite galaxies around 143 luminous spiral galaxies, with the goal of quantifying the frequency of occurrence of satellites resembling the Magellanic Clouds, around galaxies comparable to the Milky Way. For two-thirds of the central galaxies, no star-forming satellites are found, down to luminosities and star-formation rates well below those of the Magellanic Clouds. A total of 62 satellites is found, associated with 47 of the central galaxies searched. The R-band magnitude difference between central galaxies and their satellites has a median value of 4.6 mag, and a maximum of 10.2 mag. The mean projected separation of the satellites from their central galaxies is 81 kpc, or 98 kpc for systems beyond 30 Mpc. Thus star-forming satellites are quite rare, and the Milky Way is unusual both for the luminosity and the proximity of its two brightest satellites. We also find that the Clouds themselves are unusual in that they appear to form a bound binary pair; such close satellite pairs, of any luminosity, are also extremely rare in our survey.
  • We present a spectroscopic test confirming the potential of narrow-band optical imaging as a method for detecting star-forming satellites around nearby galaxies. To date the efficiency of such methods, and particularly the fraction of false detections resulting from its use, has not been tested. In this paper we use optical spectroscopy to verify the nature of objects that are apparently emission-line satellites, taken from imaging presented elsewhere. Observations of 12 probable satellites around 11 host galaxies are presented and used to compare the recession velocities of the host and satellite. This test confirms, in all cases, that there is genuine line emission, that the detected line is hydrogen alpha, and that the satellites have similar recession velocities to their hosts with a maximum difference of ~ 250 km/s, consistent with their being gravitationally bound companions. We conclude that the spectroscopy has confirmed that narrow-band imaging through H alpha filters is a reliable method for detecting genuine, star-forming satellites with low contamination from galaxies seen in projection along the line-of-sight.
  • We produce and analyse u-band luminosity functions for the red and blue populations of galaxies using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) u-band Galaxy Survey (uGS) and Deep Evolutionary Exploratory Probe 2 (DEEP2) survey. From a spectroscopic sample of 41575 SDSS uGS galaxies and 24561 DEEP2 galaxies, we produce colour magnitude diagrams and make use of the colour bimodality of galaxies to separate red and blue populations. Luminosity functions for eight redshift slices in the range 0.01 < z < 1.2 are determined using the 1/Vmax method and fitted with Schechter functions showing that there is significant evolution in M-star, with a brightening of 1.4 mags for the combined population. The integration of the Schechter functions yields the evolution in the u-band luminosity density out to z ~ 1. By parametrizing the evolution as density proportional to (1+z)^beta, we find that beta = 1.36 +- 0.2 for the combined populations and beta = 2.09 +- 0.2 for the blue population. By removing the contribution of the old stellar population to the u-band luminosity density and correcting for dust attenuation, we estimate the evolution in the star formation rate of the Universe to be beta(SFR) = 2.5 +- 0.3. Discrepancies between our result and higher evolution rates measured using the infrared and far-UV can be reconciled by considering possibilities such as an underestimated dust correction at high redshifts or evolution in the stellar initial mass function.
  • We are conducting a large survey of star formation within ~400 nearby spiral and irregular galaxies through imaging of the Halpha emission. We present here some of our first results from 104 of the galaxies in our sample, investigating the variation of SFR and Halpha EWs along the Hubble sequence for these galaxies. We find a strong dependence of SFR on Hubble type, peaking for Sbc galaxies, but with large dispersions within each type. There is a possible dependence of SFR on bar presence, but none on group membership. There is an increase in EWs for later Hubble types, but with large dispersions within each type. We find no dependence of EW on bar presence, group membership or on absolute magnitude.