• Literature data are collated for 38 stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae (SE SNe; i.e. SNe IIb, Ib, Ic and Ic-BL) that have good light curve coverage in more than one optical band. Using bolometric corrections derived in previous work, the bolometric light curve of each SN is recovered and template bolometric light curves provided. Peak light distributions and decay rates are investigated; SNe subtypes are not cleanly distinguished in this parameter space, although some grouping of types does occur and there is a suggestion of a Phillips-like relation for most SNe Ic-BL. The bolometric light curves are modelled with a simple analytical prescription and compared to results from more detailed modelling. Distributions of the explosion parameters shows the extreme nature of SNe Ic-BL in terms of their 56Ni mass and the kinetic energy, however ejected masses are similar to other subtypes. SNe Ib and Ic have very similar distributions of explosion parameters, indicating a similarity in progenitors. SNe~IIb are the most homogeneous subtype and have the lowest average values for 56Ni mass, ejected mass, and kinetic energy. Ejecta masses for each subtype and SE SNe as a whole are inconsistent with those expected from very massive stars. The majority of the ejecta mass distribution is well described by more moderately massive progenitors in binaries, indicating these are the dominant progenitor channel for SE SNe.
  • This paper presents one of the first environmental analyses of the locations of the class of `interacting transients', namely type IIn supernovae and supernova Impostors. We discuss the association of these transients with star formation, host galaxy type, metallicity, and the locations of each event within the respective host. Given the frequent assumption of very high mass progenitors for these explosions from various studies, most notably a direct progenitor detection, it is interesting to note the weak association of these subtypes with star formation as traced by H{\alpha} emission, particularly in comparison with type Ic supernovae, which trace the H{\alpha} emission and are thought to arise from high mass progenitors. The radial distributions of these transients compared to type Ic supernovae are also very different. This provides evidence for the growing hypothesis that these `interacting transients' are in fact comprised of a variety of progenitor systems. The events contained within this sample are discussed in detail, where information in the literature exists, and compared to the environmental data provided. Impostors are found to split into two main classes, in terms of environment: SN2008S-like Impostors fall on regions of zero H{\alpha} emission, whereas {\eta}-Carina-like Impostors all fall on regions with positive H{\alpha} emission. We also find indications that the Impostor class originate from lower metallicity environments than type IIn, Ic and IIP SNe.
  • Through the creation of spectral energy distributions for well-observed literature core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe), we present corrections to transform optical light curves to full bolometric light curves. These corrections take the form of parabolic fits to optical colours, with $B - I$ and $g - r$ presented as exemplary fits, while parameters for fits to other colours are also given. We find evolution of the corrections with colour to be extremely homogeneous across CCSNe of all types in the majority of cases, and also present fits for stripped-envelope and type II SNe separately. A separate fit, appropriate for SNe exhibiting strong emission due to cooling after shock breakout, is presented. Such a method will homogenise the creation of bolometric light curves for CCSNe where observations cannot constrain the emitted flux - of particular importance for current and future SN surveys where typical follow-up of the vast majority of events will occur only in the optical window, resulting in consistent comparisons of modelling involving bolometric light curves. Test cases for SNe 1987A and 2009jf using the method presented here are shown, and the bolometric light curves are recovered with excellent accuracy in each case.
  • We present a study of the properties of the host galaxies of unusual transient objects of two types, both being sub-luminous compared with the major classes of supernovae. Those of one type exhibit unusually strong calcium features, and have been termed 'Ca-rich'. Those of the second type, with SN2002cx as the prototype and SN2008ha as the most extreme example to date, have some properties in common with the first, but show typically lower ejecta velocities, and different early spectra. We confirm important differences in the environments of the two types, with the Ca-rich transients preferentially occurring in galaxies dominated by old stellar populations. Quantitatively, the association of the the Ca-rich transients with regions of ongoing star formation is well matched to that of type Ia supernovae. The SN2002cx-like transients are very different, with none of the present sample occurring in an early-type host, and a statistical association with star-formation regions similar to that of type II-P supernovae, and therefore a delay time of 30-50 Myrs.
  • Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have been used empirically as standardized candles to reveal the accelerating universe even though fundamental details, such as the nature of the progenitor system and how the star explodes, remained a mystery. There is consensus that a white dwarf star explodes after accreting matter in a binary system, but the secondary could be anything from a main sequence star to a red giant, or even another white dwarf. The uncertainty stems from the fact that no recent SN Ia has been discovered close enough to detect the stars before explosion. Here we report early observations of SN 2011fe (PTF11kly) in M101 at a distance of 6.4 Mpc, the closest SN Ia in the past 25 years. We find that the exploding star was likely a carbon-oxygen white dwarf, and from the lack of an early shock we conclude that the companion was most likely a main sequence star. Early spectroscopy shows high-velocity oxygen that varies on a time scale of hours and extensive mixing of newly synthesized intermediate mass elements in the outermost layers of the supernova. A companion paper uses pre-explosion images to rule out luminous red giants and most helium stars as companions.
  • We have used new deep observations of the Coma cluster from GALEX to identify 13 star-forming galaxies with asymmetric morphologies in the ultraviolet. Aided by optical broad-band and H-alpha imaging, we interpret the asymmetric features as being due to star formation within gas stripped from the galaxies by interaction with the cluster environment. The selected objects display a range of structures from broad fan-shaped systems of filaments and knots (`jellyfish') to narrower and smoother tails extending up to 100 kpc in length. Some of the features have been discussed previously in the literature, while others are newly identified here. As an ensemble, the candidate stripping events are located closer to the cluster centre than other star-forming galaxies; their radial distribution is similar to that of all cluster members, dominated by passive galaxies. The fraction of blue galaxies which are undergoing stripping falls from 40% in the central 500 kpc, to less than 5% beyond 1 Mpc. We find that tails pointing away from (i.e. galaxies moving towards) the cluster centre are strongly favoured (11/13 cases). From the small number of `outgoing' galaxies with stripping signatures we conclude that the stripping events occur primarily on first passage towards the cluster centre, and are short-lived compared to the cluster crossing time. Using infall trajectories from simulations, the observed fraction of blue galaxies undergoing stripping can be reproduced if the events are triggered at a threshold radius of ~1 Mpc and detectable for ~500 Myr. HST images are available for two galaxies from our sample and reveal compact blue knots coincident with UV and H-alpha emission, apparently forming stars within the stripped material. Our results confirm that stripping of gas from infalling galaxies, and associated star formation in the stripped material, is a widespread phenomenon in rich clusters.