• Although it is well known that the Ward identities prohibit anomalous dimensions for conserved currents in local field theories, a claim from certain holographic models involving bulk dilaton couplings is that the gauge field associated with the boundary current can acquire an anomalous dimension. We resolve this conundrum by showing that all the bulk actions that produce anomalous dimensions for the conserved current generate non-local actions at the boundary. In particular, the Maxwell equations are fractional. To prove this, we generalize to p-forms the Caffarelli/Silvestre (CS) extension theorem. In the context of scalar fields, this theorem demonstrates that second-order elliptic differential equations in the upper half-plane in ${\mathbb R}_+^{n+1}$ reduce to one with the fractional Laplacian, $\Delta^\gamma$, when one of the dimensions is eliminated. From the p-form generalization of the CS extension theorem, we show that at the boundary of the relevant holographic models, a fractional gauge theory emerges with equations of motion of the form, $\Delta ^\gamma A^t= 0$ with $\gamma$ $\in R$ and $A^t$ the boundary components of the gauge field. The corresponding field strength $F = d_\gamma A^t= d\Delta ^\frac{\gamma-1}{2} A^t$ is invariant under $A^t \rightarrow A^t+ d_\gamma \Lambda$ with the fractional differential given by $d_\gamma \equiv (\Delta)^\frac{\gamma-1}{2}d$, implying that $[A^t]=\gamma$ which is in general not unity.
  • We show that it is possible to construct a Virasoro algebra as a central extension of the fractional Witt algebra generated by non-local operators of the form, $L_n^a\equiv\left(\frac{\p f}{\p z}\right)^a$ where $a\in {\mathbb R}$. The Virasoro algebra is explicitly of the form, \beq [L^a_m,L_n^a]=A_{m,n}L^a_{m+n}+\delta_{m,n}h(n)cZ^a \eeq where $c$ is the central charge (not necessarily a constant), $Z^a$ is in the center of the algebra and $h(n)$ obeys a recursion relation related to the coefficients $A_{m,n}$. In fact, we show that all central extensions which respect the special structure developed here which we term a multimodule Lie-Algebra, are of this form. This result provides a mathematical foundation for non-local conformal field theories, in particular recent proposals in condensed matter in which the current has an anomalous dimension.
  • Motivated by recent bounds for charge diffusion in critical matter, we investigate the question: What sets the scale for charge diffusion in a scale-invariant system? To make our statements precise, we analyze the diffusion pole in an exactly solvable model for a Mott transition in the presence of a long-range interaction term. To achieve scale invariance, we limit our discussion to the flat-band regime. We find in this limit that the diffusion pole which would normally obtain at finite energy is pushed to zero energy resulting in a vanishing of the diffusion constant. This occurs even in the presence of interactions in certain limits, indicating the robustness of this result to the inclusion of a scale in the problem. Consequently, scale-invariance precludes any reasonable definition of the diffusion constant. Nonetheless, we do find that a scale can be defined, all be it, irrelevant to diffusion, which is the product of the squared band velocity and the density of states.
  • Using holographic renormalization coupled with the Caffarelli/Silvestre\cite{caffarelli} extension theorem, we calculate the precise form of the boundary operator dual to a bulk scalar field rather than just its average value. We show that even in the presence of interactions in the bulk, the boundary operator dual to a bulk scalar field is an anti-local operator, namely the fractional Laplacian. The propagator associated with such operators is of the general power-law (fixed by the dimension of the scalar field) type indicative of the absence of particle-like excitations at the Wilson-Fisher fixed point or the phenomenological unparticle construction. Holographic renormalization also allows us to show how radial quantization can be extended to such non-local conformal operators.
  • Recent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements of Co-doped LiFeAs report a large and robust superconducting gap on the $\Gamma$-centered hole band that lies 8 meV below the Fermi level. We show that, unlike a conventional superconductor described by BCS theory, a multiband system with strong interband Coulomb interactions can explain these observations. We model LiFeAs with a five-band model in which the shallow hole band is coupled with the other bands by only Coulomb interactions. Using Eliashberg theory, we find reasonable interaction parameters that reproduce the $T_c$ and all five gaps of LiFeAs. The energy independence of the Coulomb interactions then ensures the robustness of the gap induced on the shallow band. Furthermore, due to the repulsive nature of the Coulomb interactions, the gap changes sign between the shallow band and the other hole pockets, corresponding to an unconventional $s_{\pm}$ gap symmetry. Unlike other families of iron-based superconductors, the gap symmetry of LiFeAs has not been ascertained experimentally. The experimental implications of this sign-changing state are discussed.
  • We calculate the optical conductivity using several models for unparticle or scale-invariant matter. Within a Gaussian action for unparticles that is gauged with Wilson lines, we find that the conductivity computed from the Kubo formalism with vertex corrections yields no non-trivial deviation from the free-theory result. This result obtains because at the Gaussian level, unparticles are just a superposition of particle fields and hence any transport property must be consistent with free theory. Beyond the Gaussian approach, we adopt the continuous mass formulation of unparticles and calculate the Drude conductivity directly. We show that unparticles in this context can be tailored to yield an algebraic conductivity that scales as $\omega^{-2/3}$ with the associated phase angle between the imaginary and real parts of $\arctan\frac{\sigma_2}{\sigma_1}=60^\circ$ as is seen in the cuprates. Given the recent results\cite{Donos2014,Rangamani2015,Langley} that gravitational crystals lack a power-law optical conductivity, this constitutes the first consistent account of the $\omega^{-2/3}$ conductivity and the phase angle seen in optimally doped cuprates. Our results indicate that at each frequency in the scaling regime, excitations on all energy scales contribute. Hence, incoherence is at the heart of the power-law in the optical conductivity in strongly correlated systems such as the cuprates.
  • Using a degenerate double-exchange model, we investigate the spin excitation spectra of iron pnictides. The model consists of local spin moments on each Fe site, as well as itinerant electrons from the degenerate $d_{xz}$ and $d_{yz}$ orbitals. The local moments interact with each other through antiferromagnetic $J_{1}$-$J_{2}$ Heisenberg interactions, and they couple to the itinerant electrons through a ferromagnetic Hund coupling. We employ the fermionic spinon representation for the local moments and perform a generalized random-phase approximation calculation on both spinons and itinerant electrons. We find that in the $\left(\pi,0\right)$ magnetically-ordered state, the spin-wave excitation at $\left(\pi,\pi\right)$ is pushed to a higher energy due to the presence of itinerant electrons, which is consistent with a previous study using the Holstein-Primakoff transformation. In the paramagnetic state, the particle-hole continuum keeps the collective spin excitation near $\left(\pi,\pi\right)$ at a higher energy even without any $C_{4}$ symmetry breaking. The implications for recent high temperature neutron scattering measurements will be discussed.
  • Two remarkable features emerge from the exact Wilsonian procedure for integrating out the high-energy scale in the Hubbard model. At low energies, the number of excitations that couple minimally to the electromagnetic gauge is less than the conserved charge, thereby implying a breakdown of Fermi liquid theory. In addition, two charge $e$ excitations emerge in the lower band, the standard projected electron and a composite entity (comprised of a hole and a charge $2e$ bosonic field) which give rise to poles and zeros of the single-particle Green function, respectively. The poles generate spectral weight along an arc centered at $(\pi/2,\pi/2)$ while the zeros kill the spectral intensity on the back-side of the arc. The result is the Fermi arc structure intrinsic to cuprate phenomenology. The presence of composite excitations also produces a broad incoherent pseudogap feature at the $(\pi,0)$ region of the Brillouin zone, thereby providing a mechanism for the nodal/anti-nodal dichotomy seen in the cuprates.
  • Recent experimental developments in the iron pnictides have unambiguously demonstrated the existence of in-plane electronic anisotropy in the absence of the long-range magnetic order. Such anisotropy can arise from orbital ordering, which is described by an energy splitting between the two otherwise degenerate $d_{xz}$ and $d_{yz}$ orbitals. By including this phenomenological orbital order into a five-orbital Hubbard model, we obtain the mean-field solutions where the magnetic order is determined self-consistently. Despite sensitivity of the resulting states to the input parameters, we find that a weak orbital order that places the $d_{yz}$ orbital slightly higher in energy than the $d_{xz}$ orbital, combined with intermediate on-site interactions, produces band dispersions that are compatible with the photoemission results. In this regime, the stripe antiferromagnetic order is further stabilized and the resistivity displays the observed anisotropy. We also calculate the optical conductivity and show that it agrees with the temperature evolution of the anisotropy seen experimentally.
  • We investigate the effects of the $\sqrt{5}\times\sqrt{5}$ Fe vacancy ordering on the orbital and magnetic order in (K,Tl,Cs)$_y$Fe$_{2-x}$Se$_2$ using a three-orbital ($t_{2g}$) tight-binding Hamiltonian with generalized Hubbard interactions. We find that vacancy order enhances electron correlations, resulting in the onset of a block antiferromagnetic phase with large moments at smaller interaction strengths. In addition, vacancy ordering modulates the kinetic energy differently for the three $t_{2g}$ orbitals. This results in a breaking of the degeneracy between the $d_{xz}$ and $d_{yz}$ orbitals on each Fe site, and the onset of orbital order. Consequently, we obtain a novel inverse relation between orbital polarization and the magnetic moment. We predict that a transition from high-spin to low-spin states accompanied by a crossover from orbitally-disordered to orbitally-ordered states will be driven by doping the parent compound with electrons, which can be verified by neutron scattering and soft X-ray measurements.
  • We investigate the instabilities of the Mott-insulating phase of the weakly disordered Bose-Hubbard model within a renormalization group analysis of the replica field theory obtained by a strong-coupling expansion around the atomic limit. We identify a new order parameter and associated correlation length scale that is capable of capturing the transition from a state with zero compressibility, the Mott insulator, to one in which the compressibility is finite, the Bose glass. The order parameter is the relative variance of the disorder-induced mass distribution. In the Mott insulator, the relative variance renormalizes to zero, whereas it diverges in the Bose glass. The divergence of the relative variance signals the breakdown of self-averaging. The length scale governing the breakdown of self-averaging is the distance between rare regions. This length scale is finite in the Bose glass but diverges at the transition to the Mott insulator with an exponent of $\nu=1/D$ for incommensurate fillings. Likewise, the compressibility vanishes with an exponent of $\gamma=4/D-1$ at the transition. At commensurate fillings, the transition is controlled by a different fixed point at which both the disorder and interaction vertices are relevant.
  • In high Tc superconductors a wide ranging connection between the doping dependence of the transition temperature Tc and the room temperature thermopower Q has been observed. A "universal correlation" between these two quantities exists with the thermopower vanishing at optimum doping as noted by OCTHH (Obertelli, Cooper, Tallon, Honma and Hor). In this work we provide an interpretation of this OCTHH universality in terms of a possible underlying quantum critical point (QCP) at Tc. Central to our viewpoint is the recently noted Kelvin formula relating the thermopower to the density derivative of the entropy. Perspective on this formula is gained through a model calculation of the various Kubo formulas in an exactly solved 1-dimensional model with various limiting procedures of wave vector and frequency.
  • Within a minimal model for the iron-based superconductors in which itinerant electrons interact with a band of local moments, we derive a a general conclusion for multi-band superconductivity. In a multi-band superconductor, due to the Adler theorem, the inter-band scattering dominates the intra-band scattering at the long wave length limit as long as both interactions are induced by Goldstone boson (which is magnon in our case) and the transfered momentum is nonzero. Such kind of interaction leads to a well-known sigh-reversing superconductivity even if the inter-band and intra-band interaction are repulsive. This effect can be modeled as arising from an internal Josephson link between the Fermi surface sheets. Our model is also consistent with the recently discovered coexistence of superconductivity and magnetic order in iron-pnictides. Although the experimentally observed isotope effect is large, $\alpha=0.4$, we show that it is consistent with a non-phononic mechanism in which it is the isotope effects result in a change in the lattice constant and as a consequence the zero-point motion of the Fe atoms.
  • Precisely what are the electrons in a high-temperature superconductor doing before they superconduct? Strong electronic correlations may give rise to composite rather than fractionalized excitations, as is typical in other strongly coupled systems such as quark matter.
  • High-temperature copper oxide superconductors (cuprates) display unconventional physics when they are lightly doped whereas the standard theory of metals prevails in the opposite regime. For example, the thermoelectric power, that is the voltage that develops across a sample in response to a temperature gradient, changes sign abruptly near optimal doping in a wide class of cuprates, a stark departure from the standard theory of metals in which the thermopower vanishes only when one electron exists per site. We show that this effect arises from proximity to a state in which particle-hole symmetry is dynamically generated. The operative mechanism is dynamical spectral weight transfer from states that lie at least 2eV away from the chemical potential. We show that the sign change is reproduced quantitatively within the Hubbard model for moderate values of the on-site repulsion, $U$. For sufficiently large values of on-site repulsion, for example, $U=20t$, ($t$ the hopping matrix element), dynamical spectral weight transfer attenuates and our calculated results for the thermopower are in prefect agreement with exact atomic limit. The emergent particle-hole symmetry close to optimal doping points to pairing in the cuprates being driven by high-energy electronic states.
  • The magnetic excitations of the iron pnictides are explained within a degenerate double-exchange model. The local-moment spins are coupled by superexchanges $J_1$ and $J_2$ between nearest and next-nearest neighbors, respectively, and interact with the itinerant electrons of the degenerate $d_{xz}$ and $d_{yz}$ orbitals via a ferromagnetic Hund exchange. The latter stabilizes $(\pi,0)$ stripe antiferromagnetism due to emergent ferro-orbital order and the resulting kinetic energy gain by hopping preferably along the ferromagnetic spin direction. Taking the quantum nature of the spins into account, we calculate the magnetic excitation spectra in the presence of both, super- and double-exchange. A dramatic increase of the spin-wave energies at the competing N\'eel ordering wave vector is found, in agreement with recent neutron scattering data. The spectra are fitted to a spin-only model with a strong spatial anisotropy and additional longer ranged couplings along the ferromagnetic chains. Over a realistic parameter range, the effective couplings along the chains are negative corresponding to unfrustrated stripe antiferromagnetism.
  • Hall and optical conductivity experiments on the cuprates indicate that the low-energy fermionic degrees of freedom in a doped Mott insulator posess a component that is dynamcially generated and hence determined by the temperature. We show explicitly how the spectrum in the lower Hubbard band should be partitioned to describe such dynamically generated charge degrees of freedom and corroborate this picture with the results from the exact low-energy theory of the Hubbard model. A consequence of such dynamics is that the Landau one-to-one correspondence between bare electrons and the effective fermionic degrees of freedom at low energies breaks down explicitly. This state of affairs obtains because the total hole number is not conserved as it contains a dynamical contribution. We propose that any experimental probe that couples to the low-energy dynamics of a doped Mott insulator, quantum oscillation experiments included, should be interpreted in terms of the total dynamically generated hole number rather than the bare value.
  • In a recent Letter, Peets, et al. measured the x-ray intensity at the oxygen K-edge in overdoped La$_{2-x}$Sr$_x$CuO$_{4\pm\delta}$ (LSCO) and Tl$_2$Ba$_2$CuO$_{6+\delta}$. They claimed that, unlike the underdoped samples of LSCO and YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_x$ in which the integrated intensity increases at least linearly with doping, it saturates abruptly for a hole count exceeding $x\approx 0.23$. They interpreted the saturation as a breakdown of the 1-band Hubbard model in the cuprates. However, we show that their results are in quantitative agreement with the 1-band Hubbard model.
  • Central to the normal state of cuprate high-temperature superconductors is the collapse of the pseudogap, briefly reviewed here, at a critical point and the subsequent onset of the strange-metal characterized by a resistivity that scales linearly with temperature. A possible clue to the resolution of this problem is the inter-relation between two facts: 1) A robust theory of T-linear resistivity resulting from quantum criticality requires an additional length scale outside the standard 1-parameter scaling scenario and 2) breaking the Landau correspondence between the Fermi gas and an interacting system with short-range repulsions requires non-fermionic degrees. We show that a low-energy theory of the Hubbard model which correctly incorporates dynamical spectral weight transfer has the extra degrees of freedom needed to describe this physics. The degrees of freedom that mix into the lower band as a result of dynamical spectral weight transfer are shown to either decouple beyond a critical doping, thereby signaling Mottness collapse or unbind above a critical temperature yielding strange metal behaviour characterised by $T-$linear resistivity.
  • High-temperature superconductivity in the copper-oxide ceramics remains an unsolved problem because we do not know what the propagating degrees of freedom are in the normal state. As a result, we do not know what are the weakly interacting degrees of freedom which pair up to form the superconducting condensate. That the electrons are not the propagating degrees of freedom in the cuprates is seen most directly from experiments that show spectral weight redistributions over all energy scales. Of course, the actual propagating degrees of freedom minimize such spectral rearrangements. This review focuses on the range of epxerimental consequences such UV-IR mixings have on the normal state of the cuprates, such as the pseudogap, mid-infrared band, temperature dependence of the Hall number, the superfluid density, and a recent theoretical advance which permits the identification of the weakly interacting degrees of freedom in a doped Mott insulator. Within this theory, we show how the wide range of phenomena which typify the normal state of the cuprates arises including $T-$linear resistivity.
  • We attribute the structural phase transition (SPT) in the parent compounds of the iron pnictides to orbital ordering. Due to the anisotropy of the $d_{xz}$ and $d_{yz}$ orbitals in the $xy$ plane, a ferro-orbital ordering makes the orthorhombic structure more energetically favorable, thus inducing the SPT. In this orbital-ordered system, the sites with orbitals that do not order have higher energies. Scattering of the itinerant electrons by these localized two-level systems causes a resistivity anomaly upon the onset of the SPT. The proposed orbital ordering also leads to the stripe-like anti-ferromagnetism and anisotropy of the magnetic exchanges. This model is quantitatively consistent with available experimental observations.
  • In a Comment [arXiv:0910.1256], Behnia contends that the surface theory put forward in our recent Letter [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 136803 (2009); arXiv:0905.0689] as an alternative explanation of the anomalous peaks observed in Nernst measurement on a single-crystal bismuth sample at high (> 9 T) magnetic fields [Science 317, 1729 (2007); arXiv:0802.1993] is not consistent with the order of magnitude and shape of the anomalous peaks observed in the experiment. We explain in this Reply why this contention is not true.
  • We study the weakly disordered Bose-Hubbard model on a cubic lattice through a one-loop renormalization group analysis of the corresponding effective field theory which is explicitly derived by combining a strong-coupling expansion with a replica average over the disorder. The method is applied not only to generic uncorrelated on-site disorder but also to simultaneous hopping disorder correlated with the differences of adjacent disorder potentials. Such correlations are inherent in fine-grained optical speckle potentials used as a source of disorder in optical lattice experiments. As a result of strong coupling, the strength of the replica mixing disorder vertex, responsible for the emergence of a Bose glass, crucially depends on the chemical potential and the Hubbard repulsion and vanishes to leading order in the disorder at commensurate boson fillings. As a consequence, at such fillings a direct transition between the Mott-insulator and the superfluid in the presence of disorder cannot be excluded on the basis of a one-loop calculation. At incommensurate fillings, at a certain length scale, the Mott insulator will eventually become unstable towards the formation of a Boss glass. Phase diagrams as a function of the microscopic parameters are presented and the finite-size crossover between the Mott-insulating state and the Bose glass is analyzed.
  • We show exactly that the only charged excitations that exist in the strong-coupling limit of the half-filled Hubbard model are gapped composite excitations generated by the dynamics of the charge $2e$ boson that appears upon explicit integration of the high-energy scale. At every momentum, such excitations have non-zero spectral weight at two distinct energy scales separated by the on-site repulsion $U$. The result is a gap in the spectrum for the composite excitations accompanied by a discontinuous vanishing of the density of states at the chemical potential when $U$ exceeds the bandwidth. Consequently, we resolve the long-standing problem of the cause of the charge gap in a half-filled band in the absence of symmetry breaking.
  • Starting from the effective low energy theory of a doped Mott insulator, we show that the effective carrier density in the underdoped regime agrees with a two - fluid description. Namely, it has distinct temperature independent and thermally activated components. We identify the thermally activated component as the bound state of a hole and a charge 2e boson, which occurs naturally in the effective theory. The thermally activated unbinding of this state leads to the strange metal and subsequent $T-$linear resistivity. We find that the doping dependence of the binding energy is in excellent agreement with the experimentally determined pseudogap energy scale in cuprate superconductors.