• Wavelet (Besov) priors are a promising way of reconstructing indirectly measured fields in a regularized manner. We demonstrate how wavelets can be used as a localized basis for reconstructing permeability fields with sharp interfaces from noisy pointwise pressure field measurements in the context of the elliptic inverse problem. For this we derive the adjoint method of minimizing the Besov-norm-regularized misfit functional (this corresponds to determining the maximum a posteriori point in the Bayesian point of view) in the Haar wavelet setting. As it turns out, choosing a wavelet--based prior allows for accelerated optimization compared to established trigonometrically--based priors.
  • The Ensemble Kalman methodology in an inverse problems setting can be viewed as an iterative scheme, which is a weakly tamed discretization scheme for a certain stochastic differential equation (SDE). Assuming a suitable approximation result, dynamical properties of the SDE can be rigorously pulled back via the discrete scheme to the original Ensemble Kalman inversion. The results of this paper make a step towards closing the gap of the missing approximation result by proving a strong convergence result in a simplified model of a scalar stochastic differential equation. We focus here on a toy model with similar properties than the one arising in the context of Ensemble Kalman filter. The proposed model can be interpreted as a single particle filter for a linear map and thus forms the basis for further analysis. The difficulty in the analysis arises from the formally derived limiting SDE with non-globally Lipschitz continuous nonlinearities both in the drift and in the diffusion. Here the standard Euler-Maruyama scheme might fail to provide a strongly convergent numerical scheme and taming is necessary. In contrast to the strong taming usually used, the method presented here provides a weaker form of taming. We present a strong convergence analysis by first proving convergence on a domain of high probability by using a cut-off or localisation, which then leads, combined with bounds on moments for both the SDE and the numerical scheme, by a bootstrapping argument to strong convergence.
  • In a Bayesian inverse problem setting, the solution consists of a posterior measure obtained by combining prior belief, information about the forward operator, and noisy observational data. This measure is most often given in terms of a density with respect to a reference measure in a high-dimensional (or infinite-dimensional) Banach space. Although Monte Carlo sampling methods provide a way of querying the posterior, the necessity of evaluating the forward operator many times (which will often be a costly PDE solver) prohibits this in practice. For this reason, many practitioners choose a suitable Gaussian approximation of the posterior measure, in a procedure called Laplace's method. Once generated, this Gaussian measure is a lot easier to sample from and properties like moments are immediately acquired. This paper derives Laplace's approximation of the posterior measure attributed to the inverse problem explicitly as the posterior measure of a second-order approximation of the data-misfit functional, specifically in the infinite-dimensional setting. By use of a reverse Cauchy-Schwarz inequality we are able to explicitly bound the Hellinger distance between the posterior and its approximation.
  • We study the maximum norm behavior of $L^2$-normalized random Fourier cosine series with a prescribed large wave number. Precise bounds of this type are an important technical tool in estimates for spinodal decomposition, the celebrated phase separation phenomenon in metal alloys. We derive rigorous asymptotic results as the wave number converges to infinity, and shed light on the behavior of the maximum norm for medium range wave numbers through numerical simulations. Finally, we develop a simplified model for describing the magnitude of extremal values of random Neumann Fourier series. The model describes key features of the development of maxima and can be used to predict them. This is achieved by decoupling magnitude and sign distribution, where the latter plays an important role for the study of the size of the maximum norm. Since we are considering series with Neumann boundary conditions, particular care has to be placed on understanding the behavior of the random sums at the boundary.
  • In this note we introduce linear regression with basis functions in order to apply Bayesian model selection. The goal is to incorporate Occam's razor as provided by Bayes analysis in order to automatically pick the model optimally able to explain the data without overfitting.
  • We study the two-dimensional snake-like pattern that arises in phase separation of alloys described by spinodal decomposition in the Cahn-Hilliard model. These are somewhat universal patterns due to an overlay of eigenfunctions of the Laplacian with a similar wave-number. Similar structures appear in other models like reaction-diffusion systems describing animal coats' patterns or vegetation patterns in desertification. Our main result studies random functions given by cosine Fourier series with independent Gaussian coefficients, that dominate the dynamics in the Cahn-Hilliard model. This is not a cosine process, as the sum is taken over domains in Fourier space that not only grow and scale with a parameter of order $1/\varepsilon$, but also move to infinity. Moreover, the model under consideration is neither stationary nor isotropic. To study the pattern size of nodal domains we consider the density of zeros on any straight line through the spatial domain. Using a theorem by Edelman and Kostlan and weighted ergodic theorems that ensure the convergence of the moving sums, we show that the average distance of zeros is asymptotically of order $\varepsilon$ with a precisely given constant.