• We report on the observation of suppression and revival of coherent backscattering of ultra-cold atoms launched in an optical disorder and submitted to a short dephasing pulse, as proposed in a recent paper of T. Micklitz \textit{et al.} [arXiv:1406.6915]. This observation, in a quasi-2D geometry, demonstrates a novel and general method to study weak localization by manipulating time reversal symmetry in disordered systems. In future experiments, this scheme could be extended to investigate higher order localization processes at the heart of Anderson (strong) localization.
  • We propose a scheme to tailor nanostructured trapping potentials for ultracold atoms. Our trapping scheme combines an engineered extension of repulsive optical dipole forces at short distances and attractive Casimir-Polder forces at long distances between an atom and a nanostructured surface. This extended dipole force takes advantage of excited-state dressing by plasmonically-enhanced intensity to doubly dress the ground state and create a strongly repulsive potential with spatially tunable characteristics. In this work, we show that, under realistic experimental conditions, this method can be used to trap Rubidium atoms close to surfaces (tens of nanometers) or to realize nanostructured lattices with subwavelength periods. The influence of the various losses and heating rate mechanism in such traps is characterized. As an example we present a near-field optical lattice with 100nm period and study the tunability of lattice and trapping depths. Such lattices can enhance energy scales with interesting perspectives for the simulation of strongly-correlated physics. Our method can be extended to other atomic species and to other near-field hybrid systems where a strong atom-light interaction can be expected.
  • Quantum technology based on cold-atom interferometers is showing great promise for fields such as inertial sensing and fundamental physics. However, the best precision achievable on Earth is limited by the free-fall time of the atoms, and their full potential can only be realized in Space where interrogation times of many seconds will lead to unprecedented sensitivity. Various mission scenarios are presently being pursued which plan to implement matter-wave inertial sensors. Toward this goal, we realize the first onboard operation of simultaneous $^{87}$Rb $-$ $^{39}$K interferometers in the weightless environment produced during parabolic flight. The large vibration levels ($10^{-2}~g/\sqrt{\rm Hz}$), acceleration range ($0-1.8~g$) and rotation rates ($5$ deg/s) during flight present significant challenges. We demonstrate the capability of our dual-quantum sensor by measuring the E\"{o}tv\"{o}s parameter with systematic-limited uncertainties of $1.1 \times 10^{-3}$ and $3.0 \times 10^{-4}$ during standard- and micro-gravity, respectively. This constitutes the first test of the equivalence principle in a free-falling vehicle with quantum sensors. Our results are applicable to inertial navigation, and can be extended to the trajectory of a satellite for future Space missions.
  • The emerging field of on-chip integration of nanophotonic devices and cold atoms offers extremely-strong and pure light-matter interaction schemes, which may have profound impact on quantum information science. In this context, a long-standing obstacle is to achieve strong interaction between single atoms and single photons, while at the same time trap atoms in vacuum at large separation distances from dielectric surfaces. In this work, we study new waveguide geometries that challenge these conflicting objectives. The designed photonic crystal waveguide is expected to offer a good compromise, which additionally allows for easy manipulation of atomic clouds around the structure, while being tolerant to fabrication imperfections.
  • Atom interferometers have a multitude of proposed applications in space including precise measurements of the Earth's gravitational field, in navigation & ranging, and in fundamental physics such as tests of the weak equivalence principle (WEP) and gravitational wave detection. While atom interferometers are realized routinely in ground-based laboratories, current efforts aim at the development of a space compatible design optimized with respect to dimensions, weight, power consumption, mechanical robustness and radiation hardness. In this paper, we present a design of a high-sensitivity differential dual species $^{85}$Rb/$^{87}$Rb atom interferometer for space, including physics package, laser system, electronics and software. The physics package comprises the atom source consisting of dispensers and a 2D magneto-optical trap (MOT), the science chamber with a 3D-MOT, a magnetic trap based on an atom chip and an optical dipole trap (ODT) used for Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) creation and interferometry, the detection unit, the vacuum system for $10^{-11}$ mbar ultra-high vacuum generation, and the high-suppression factor magnetic shielding as well as the thermal control system. The laser system is based on a hybrid approach using fiber-based telecom components and high-power laser diode technology and includes all laser sources for 2D-MOT, 3D-MOT, ODT, interferometry and detection. Manipulation and switching of the laser beams is carried out on an optical bench using Zerodur bonding technology. The instrument consists of 9 units with an overall mass of 221 kg, an average power consumption of 608 W (819 W peak), and a volume of 470 liters which would well fit on a satellite to be launched with a Soyuz rocket, as system studies have shown.
  • Since the first atom interferometry experiments in 1991, measurements of rotation through the Sagnac effect in open-area atom interferometers has been studied. These studies have demonstrated very high sensitivity which can compete with state-of-the-art optical Sagnac interferometers. Since the early 2000s, these developments have been motivated by possible applications in inertial guidance and geophysics. Most matter-wave interferometers that have been investigated since then are based on two-photon Raman transitions for the manipulation of atomic wave packets. Results from the two most studied configurations, a space-domain interferometer with atomic beams and a time-domain interferometer with cold atoms, are presented and compared. Finally, the latest generation of cold atom interferometers and their preliminary results are presented.
  • We present in detail the scientific objectives in fundamental physics of the Space-Time Explorer and QUantum Equivalence Space Test (STE-QUEST) space mission. STE-QUEST was pre-selected by the European Space Agency together with four other missions for the cosmic vision M3 launch opportunity planned around 2024. It carries out tests of different aspects of the Einstein Equivalence Principle using atomic clocks, matter wave interferometry and long distance time/frequency links, providing fascinating science at the interface between quantum mechanics and gravitation that cannot be achieved, at that level of precision, in ground experiments. We especially emphasize the specific strong interest of performing equivalence principle tests in the quantum regime, i.e. using quantum atomic wave interferometry. Although STE-QUEST was finally not selected in early 2014 because of budgetary and technological reasons, its science case was very highly rated. Our aim is to expose that science to a large audience in order to allow future projects and proposals to take advantage of the STE-QUEST experience.
  • We consider the decoherence of a pseudo-spin ensemble under collective random rotations, and study, both theoretically and experimentally, how a nondestructive measurement combined with real-time feedback correction can protect the state against such a decoherence process. We theoretically characterize the feedback efficiency with different parameters --- coherence, entropy, fidelity --- and show that a maximum efficiency is reached in the weak measurement regime, when the projection of the state induced by the measurement is negligible. This article presents in detail the experimental results published in [Phys. Rev. Lett. \textbf{110}, 210503 (2013)], where the feedback scheme stabilizes coherent spin states of trapped ultra-cold atoms, and nondestructively probed with a dispersive optical detection. In addition, we study the influence of several parameters, such as atom number and rotation angle, on the performance of the method. We analyze the various decoherence sources limiting the feedback efficiency and propose how to mitigate their effect. The results demonstrate the potential of the method for the real-time coherent control of atom interferometers.
  • We experimentally study the effect of disorder on trapped quasi two-dimensional (2D) 87Rb clouds in the vicinity of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) phase transition. The disorder correlation length is of the order of the Bose gas characteristic length scales (thermal de Broglie wavelength, healing length) and disorder thus modifies the physics at a microscopic level. We analyze the coherence properties of the cloud through measurements of the momentum distributions, for two disorder strengths, as a function of its degeneracy. For moderate disorder, the emergence of coherence remains steep but is shifted to a lower entropy. In contrast, for strong disorder, the growth of coherence is hindered. Our study is an experimental realization of the dirty boson problem in a well controlled atomic system suitable for quantitative analysis.
  • We report the relative frequency stabilization of a distributed feedback erbium-doped fiber laser on an optical cavity by serrodyne frequency shifting. A correction bandwidth of 2.3 MHz and a dynamic range of 220 MHz are achieved, which leads to a strong robustness against large disturbances up to high frequencies. We demonstrate that serrodyne frequency shifting reaches a higher correction bandwidth and lower relative frequency noise level compared to a standard acousto-optical modulator based scheme. Our results allow to consider promising applications in the absolute frequency stabilization of lasers on optical cavities.
  • Inertial sensors relying on atom interferometry offer a breakthrough advance in a variety of applications, such as inertial navigation, gravimetry or ground- and space-based tests of fundamental physics. These instruments require a quiet environment to reach their performance and using them outside the laboratory remains a challenge. Here we report the first operation of an airborne matter-wave accelerometer set up aboard a 0g plane and operating during the standard gravity (1g) and microgravity (0g) phases of the flight. At 1g, the sensor can detect inertial effects more than 300 times weaker than the typical acceleration fluctuations of the aircraft. We describe the improvement of the interferometer sensitivity in 0g, which reaches 2 x 10-4 ms-2 / \surdHz with our current setup. We finally discuss the extension of our method to airborne and spaceborne tests of the Universality of free fall with matter waves.
  • We report on a novel experiment to generate non-classical atomic states via quantum non-demolition (QND) measurements on cold atomic samples prepared in a high finesse ring cavity. The heterodyne technique developed for the QND detection exhibits an optical shot-noise limited behavior for local oscillator optical power of a few hundred \muW, and a detection bandwidth of several GHz. This detection tool is used in single pass to follow non destructively the internal state evolution of an atomic sample when subjected to Rabi oscillations or a spin-echo interferometric sequence.
  • We propose an atom interferometer gravitational wave detector in low Earth orbit (AGIS-LEO). Gravitational waves can be observed by comparing a pair of atom interferometers separated over a ~30 km baseline. In the proposed configuration, one or three of these interferometer pairs are simultaneously operated through the use of two or three satellites in formation flight. The three satellite configuration allows for the increased suppression of multiple noise sources and for the detection of stochastic gravitational wave signals. The mission will offer a strain sensitivity of < 10^(-18) / Hz^(1/2) in the 50 mHz - 10 Hz frequency range, providing access to a rich scientific region with substantial discovery potential. This band is not currently addressed with the LIGO or LISA instruments. We analyze systematic backgrounds that are relevant to the mission and discuss how they can be mitigated at the required levels. Some of these effects do not appear to have been considered previously in the context of atom interferometry, and we therefore expect that our analysis will be broadly relevant to atom interferometric precision measurements. Finally, we present a brief conceptual overview of shorter-baseline (< 100 m) atom interferometer configurations that could be deployed as proof-of-principle instruments on the International Space Station (AGIS-ISS) or an independent satellite.
  • Atom interferometry represents a quantum leap in the technology for the ultra-precise monitoring of accelerations and rotations and, therefore, for all the science that relies on the latter quantities. These sensors evolved from a new kind of optics based on matter-waves rather than light-waves and might result in an advancement of the fundamental detection limits by several orders of magnitude. Matter-wave optics is still a young, but rapidly progressing science. The Space Atom Interferometer project (SAI), funded by the European Space Agency, in a multi-pronged approach aims to investigate both experimentally and theoretically the various aspects of placing atom interferometers in space: the equipment needs, the realistically expected performance limits and potential scientific applications in a micro-gravity environment considering all aspects of quantum, relativistic and metrological sciences. A drop-tower compatible prototype of a single-axis atom interferometry accelerometer is under construction. At the same time the team is studying new schemes, e.g. based on degenerate quantum gases as source for the interferometer. A drop-tower compatible atom interferometry acceleration sensor prototype has been designed, and the manufacturing of its subsystems has been started. A compact modular laser system for cooling and trapping rubidium atoms has been assembled. A compact Raman laser module, featuring outstandingly low phase noise, has been realized. Possible schemes to implement coherent atomic sources in the atom interferometer have been experimentally demonstrated.
  • We propose a scheme for testing the weak equivalence principle (Universality of Free Fall) using an atom-interferometric measurement of the local differential acceleration between two atomic species with a large mass ratio as test masses. A apparatus in free fall can be used to track atomic free-fall trajectories over large distances. We show how the differential acceleration can be extracted from the interferometric signal using Bayesian statistical estimation, even in the case of a large mass and laser wavelength difference. We show that this statistical estimation method does not suffer from acceleration noise of the platform and does not require repeatable experimental conditions. We specialize our discussion to a dual potassium/rubidium interferometer and extend our protocol with other atomic mixtures. Finally, we discuss the performances of the UFF test developed for the free-fall (0-g) airplane in the ICE project (\verb"http://www.ice-space.fr")
  • We report on light-shift tomography of a cloud of 87 Rb atoms in a far-detuned optical-dipole trap at 1565 nm. Our method is based on standard absorption imaging, but takes advantage of the strong light-shift of the excited state of the imaging transition, which is due to a quasi-resonance of the trapping laser with a higher excited level. We use this method to (i) map the equipotentials of a crossed optical-dipole trap, and (ii) study the thermalisation of an atomic cloud by following the evolution of the potential-energy of atoms during the free-evaporation process.
  • We study the suppression of nonlinear interactions in resonant macroscopic quantum devices in the case of the solid-state ring laser gyroscope. These nonlinear interactions are tuned by vibrating the gain medium along the cavity axis. Beat note occurrence under rotation provides a precise measurement of the strength of nonlinear interactions, which turn out to vanish for some discrete values of the amplitude of vibration. Our theoretical description, in very good agreement with the measured data, suggests the use of a higher vibration frequency to achieve quasi-ideal rotation sensing over a broad range of rotation speeds. We finally underline the analogy between this device and some other macroscopic quantum rotation sensors, such as ring-shaped superfluid configurations, where nonlinear interactions could be tuned for example by the use of magnetically-induced Feschbach resonance.
  • We study the Anderson localization of Bogolyubov quasiparticles in an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate (with healing length \xi) subjected to a random potential (with finite correlation length \sigma_R). We derive analytically the Lyapunov exponent as a function of the quasiparticle momentum k and we study the localization maximum k_{max}. For 1D speckle potentials, we find that k_{max} is proportional to 1/\xi when \xi is much larger than \sigma_R while k_{max} is proportional to 1/\sigma_R when \xi is much smaller than \sigma_R, and that the localization is strongest when \xi is of the order of \sigma_R. Numerical calculations support our analysis and our estimates indicate that the localization of the Bogolyubov quasiparticles is accessible in current experiments with ultracold atoms.
  • The accuracy and precision of current atom-interferometric inertialsensors rival state-of-the-art conventional devices using artifact-based test masses . Atomic sensors are well suited for fundamental measurements of gravito-inertial fields. The sensitivity required to test gravitational theories can be achieved by extending the baseline of the interferometer. The I.C.E. (Interf\'erom\'etrie Coh\'erente pour l'Espace) interferometer aims to achieve long interrogation times in compact apparatus via reduced gravity. We have tested a cold-atom source during airplane parabolic flights. We show that this environment is compatible with free-fall interferometric measurements using up to 4 second interrogation time. We present the next-generation apparatus using degenerate gases for low release-velocity atomic sources in space-borne experiments.
  • We study an ultracold Bose gas in the presence of 1D disorder for repulsive inter-atomic interactions varying from zero to the Thomas-Fermi regime. We show that for weak interactions the Bose gas populates a finite number of localized single-particle Lifshits states, while for strong interactions a delocalized disordered Bose-Einstein condensate is formed. We discuss the schematic quantum-state diagram and derive the equations of state for various regimes.
  • We present a detailed analysis of the 1D expansion of a coherent interacting matterwave (a Bose-Einstein condensate) in the presence of disorder. A 1D random potential is created via laser speckle patterns. It is carefully calibrated and the self-averaging properties of our experimental system are discussed. We observe the suppression of the transport of the BEC in the random potential. We discuss the scenario of disorder-induced trapping taking into account the radial extension in our experimental 3D BEC and we compare our experimental results with the theoretical predictions.
  • A theoretical and experimental investigation of the effects of mode coupling in a resonant macro- scopic quantum device is achieved in the case of a ring laser. In particular, we show both analytically and experimentally that such a device can be used as a rotation sensor provided the effects of mode coupling are controlled, for example through the use of an additional coupling. A possible general- ization of this example to the case of another resonant macroscopic quantum device is discussed.
  • We have developed a compact partially ferromagnetic electromagnet to produce a Ioffe-Pritchard trap for neutral atoms. Our structure permits strong magnetic confinement with low power consumption. Compared to the previous iron-core electromagnet, it allows for easy compensation of remnant fields and very high stability, along with cost-effective realization and compactness. We describe and characterize our apparatus and demonstrate trapping and cooling of Rb 87 atoms to quantum degeneracy. Pure Bose-Einstein condensates containing 10^6 atoms are routinely realized on a half-minute cycle. In addition we test the stability of the magnetic trap by producing atom lasers.
  • We measure the spatial correlation function of Bose-Einstein condensates in the cross-over region between phase-coherent and strongly phase-fluctuating condensates. We observe the continuous path from a gaussian-like shape to an exponential-like shape characteristic of one-dimensional phase-fluctuations. The width of the spatial correlation function as a function of the temperature shows that the condensate coherence length undergoes no sharp transition between these two regimes.
  • We have investigated experimentally the finite-temperature properties of a Bose-Einstein condensed cloud of $^{87}$Rb atoms in a harmonic trap. Focusing primarily on condensed fraction and expansion energy, we measure unambiguous deviations from ideal-gas thermodynamics, and obtain good agreement with a Hartree-Fock description of the mixed cloud. Our results offer for the first time clear evidence of the mutual interaction between the condensed and thermal components. To probe the low-temperature region unaccessible to the usual time-of-flight technique, we use coherent Bragg scattering as a filtering technique for the condensate. This allows us to separate spatially the condensed and normal components in time of flight, and to measure reliably temperatures as low as $0.2 T_{\rm c}^0$ and thermal fractions as low as 10%.Finally, we observe evidence for the limitations of the usual image analysis procedure, pointing out to the need for a more elaborate model of the expansion of the mixed cloud.