• The modeling and analysis of an LRU cache is extremely challenging as exact results for the main performance metrics (e.g. hit rate) are either lacking or cannot be used because of their high computational complexity for large caches. As a result, various approximations have been proposed. The state-of-the-art method is the so-called TTL approximation, first proposed and shown to be asymptotically exact for IRM requests by Fagin. It has been applied to various other workload models and numerically demonstrated to be accurate but without theoretical justification. In this paper we provide theoretical justification for the approximation in the case where distinct contents are described by independent stationary and ergodic processes. We show that this approximation is exact as the cache size and the number of contents go to infinity. This extends earlier results for the independent reference model. Moreover, we establish results not only for the aggregate cache hit probability but also for every individual content. Last, we obtain bounds on the rate of convergence.
  • In this paper, we consider the problem of allocating cache resources among multiple content providers. The cache can be partitioned into slices and each partition can be dedicated to a particular content provider, or shared among a number of them. It is assumed that each partition employs the LRU policy for managing content. We propose utility-driven partitioning, where we associate with each content provider a utility that is a function of the hit rate observed by the content provider. We consider two scenarios: i)~content providers serve disjoint sets of files, ii)~there is some overlap in the content served by multiple content providers. In the first case, we prove that cache partitioning outperforms cache sharing as cache size and numbers of contents served by providers go to infinity. In the second case, It can be beneficial to have separate partitions for overlapped content. In the case of two providers, it is usually always beneficial to allocate a cache partition to serve all overlapped content and separate partitions to serve the non-overlapped contents of both providers. We establish conditions when this is true asymptotically but also present an example where it is not true asymptotically. We develop online algorithms that dynamically adjust partition sizes in order to maximize the overall utility and prove that they converge to optimal solutions, and through numerical evaluations, we show they are effective.
  • We analyze the connectivity of an $M$-layer network over a common set of nodes that are active only in a fraction of the layers. Each layer is assumed to be a subgraph (of an underlying connectivity graph $G$) induced by each node being active in any given layer with probability $q$. The $M$-layer network is formed by aggregating the edges over all $M$ layers. We show that when $q$ exceeds a threshold $q_c(M)$, a giant connected component appears in the $M$-layer network---thereby enabling far-away users to connect using `bridge' nodes that are active in multiple network layers---even though the individual layers may only have small disconnected islands of connectivity. We show that $q_c(M) \lesssim \sqrt{-\ln(1-p_c)}\,/{\sqrt{M}}$, where $p_c$ is the bond percolation threshold of $G$, and $q_c(1) \equiv q_c$ is its site percolation threshold. We find $q_c(M)$ exactly for when $G$ is a large random network with an arbitrary node-degree distribution. We find $q_c(M)$ numerically for various regular lattices, and find an exact lower bound for the kagome lattice. Finally, we find an intriguingly close connection between this multilayer percolation model and the well-studied problem of site-bond percolation, in the sense that both models provide a smooth transition between the traditional site and bond percolation models. Using this connection, we translate known analytical approximations of the site-bond critical region, which are functions only of $p_c$ and $q_c$ of the respective lattice, to excellent general approximations of the multilayer connectivity threshold $q_c(M)$.
  • In source routing, a complete path is chosen for a packet to travel from source to destination. While computing the time to traverse such a path may be straightforward in a fixed, static graph, doing so becomes much more challenging in dynamic graphs, in which the state of an edge in one time slot (i.e., its presence or absence) is random, and may depend on its state in the previous time step. The traversal time is due to both time spent waiting for edges to appear and time spent crossing them once they become available. We compute the expected traversal time (ETT) for a dynamic path in a number of special cases of stochastic edge dynamics models, and for three edge failure models, culminating in a surprisingly challenging yet realistic setting in which the initial configuration of edge states for the entire path is known. We show that the ETT for this "initial configuration" setting can be computed in quadratic time, by an algorithm based on probability generating functions. We also give several linear-time upper and lower bounds on the ETT.
  • In this paper we study the behavior of a continuous time random walk (CTRW) on a stationary and ergodic time varying dynamic graph. We establish conditions under which the CTRW is a stationary and ergodic process. In general, the stationary distribution of the walker depends on the walker rate and is difficult to characterize. However, we characterize the stationary distribution in the following cases: i) the walker rate is significantly larger or smaller than the rate in which the graph changes (time-scale separation), ii) the walker rate is proportional to the degree of the node that it resides on (coupled dynamics), and iii) the degrees of node belonging to the same connected component are identical (structural constraints). We provide examples that illustrate our theoretical findings.
  • A typical web search engine consists of three principal parts: crawling engine, indexing engine, and searching engine. The present work aims to optimize the performance of the crawling engine. The crawling engine finds new web pages and updates web pages existing in the database of the web search engine. The crawling engine has several robots collecting information from the Internet. We first calculate various performance measures of the system (e.g., probability of arbitrary page loss due to the buffer overflow, probability of starvation of the system, the average time waiting in the buffer). Intuitively, we would like to avoid system starvation and at the same time to minimize the information loss. We formulate the problem as a multi-criteria optimization problem and attributing a weight to each criterion. We solve it in the class of threshold policies. We consider a very general web page arrival process modeled by Batch Marked Markov Arrival Process and a very general service time modeled by Phase-type distribution. The model has been applied to the performance evaluation and optimization of the crawler designed by INRIA Maestro team in the framework of the RIAM INRIA-Canon research project.
  • In this paper we study the dynamic aspects of the coverage of a mobile sensor network resulting from continuous movement of sensors. As sensors move around, initially uncovered locations are likely to be covered at a later time. A larger area is covered as time continues, and intruders that might never be detected in a stationary sensor network can now be detected by moving sensors. However, this improvement in coverage is achieved at the cost that a location is covered only part of the time, alternating between covered and not covered. We characterize area coverage at specific time instants and during time intervals, as well as the time durations that a location is covered and uncovered. We further characterize the time it takes to detect a randomly located intruder. For mobile intruders, we take a game theoretic approach and derive optimal mobility strategies for both sensors and intruders. Our results show that sensor mobility brings about unique dynamic coverage properties not present in a stationary sensor network, and that mobility can be exploited to compensate for the lack of sensors to improve coverage.