• Around the time of its perihelion passage the observability of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from Earth was limited to very short windows each morning from any given site, due to the low solar elongation of the comet. The peak in the comet's activity was therefore difficult to observe with conventionally scheduled telescopes, but was possible where service/queue scheduled mode was possible, and with robotic telescopes. We describe the robotic observations that allowed us to measure the total activity of the comet around perihelion, via photometry (dust) and spectroscopy (gas), and compare these results with the measurements at this time by Rosetta's instruments. The peak of activity occurred approximately two weeks after perihelion. The total brightness (dust) largely followed the predictions from Snodgrass et al. 2013, with no significant change in total activity levels from previous apparitions. The CN gas production rate matched previous orbits near perihelion, but appeared to be relatively low later in the year.
  • We report the discovery and orbit of a new dwarf planet candidate, 2015 RR$_{245}$, by the Outer Solar System Origins Survey (OSSOS). 2015 RR$_{245}$'s orbit is eccentric ($e=0.586$), with a semi-major axis near 82 au, yielding a perihelion distance of 34 au. 2015 RR$_{245}$ has $g-r = 0.59 \pm 0.11$ and absolute magnitude $H_{r} = 3.6 \pm 0.1$; for an assumed albedo of $p_V = 12$% the object has a diameter of $\sim670$ km. Based on astrometric measurements from OSSOS and Pan-STARRS1, we find that 2015 RR$_{245}$ is securely trapped on ten-Myr timescales in the 9:2 mean-motion resonance with Neptune. It is the first TNO identified in this resonance. On hundred-Myr timescales, particles in 2015 RR$_{245}$-like orbits depart and sometimes return to the resonance, indicating that 2015 RR$_{245}$ likely forms part of the long-lived metastable population of distant TNOs that drift between resonance sticking and actively scattering via gravitational encounters with Neptune. The discovery of a 9:2 TNO stresses the role of resonances in the long-term evolution of objects in the scattering disk, and reinforces the view that distant resonances are heavily populated in the current Solar System. This object further motivates detailed modelling of the transient sticking population.
  • We report the discovery, tracking and detection circumstances for 85 trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) from the first 42 deg$^{2}$ of the Outer Solar System Origins Survey (OSSOS). This ongoing $r$-band Solar System survey uses the 0.9 deg$^{2}$ field-of-view MegaPrime camera on the 3.6 m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Our orbital elements for these TNOs are precise to a fractional semi-major axis uncertainty $<0.1\%$. We achieve this precision in just two oppositions, as compared to the normal 3-5 oppositions, via a dense observing cadence and innovative astrometric technique. These discoveries are free of ephemeris bias, a first for large trans-Neptunian surveys. We also provide the necessary information to enable models of TNO orbital distributions to be tested against our TNO sample. We confirm the existence of a cold "kernel" of objects within the main cold classical Kuiper belt, and infer the existence of an extension of the "stirred" cold classical Kuiper belt to at least several AU beyond the 2:1 mean motion resonance with Neptune. We find that the population model of Petit et al. (2011) remains a plausible representation of the Kuiper belt. The full survey, to be completed in 2017, will provide an exquisitely characterized sample of important resonant TNO populations, ideal for testing models of giant planet migration during the early history of the Solar System.
  • We review the reservoirs of methane clathrates that may exist in the different bodies of the Solar System. Methane was formed in the interstellar medium prior to having been embedded in the protosolar nebula gas phase. This molecule was subsequently trapped in clathrates that formed from crystalline water ice during the cooling of the disk and incorporated in this form in the building blocks of comets, icy bodies, and giant planets. Methane clathrates may play an important role in the evolution of planetary atmospheres. On Earth, the production of methane in clathrates is essentially biological, and these compounds are mostly found in permafrost regions or in the sediments of continental shelves. On Mars, methane would more likely derive from hydrothermal reactions with olivine-rich material. If they do exist, martian methane clathrates would be stable only at depth in the cryosphere and sporadically release some methane into the atmosphere via mechanisms that remain to be determined.
  • Spectrophotometric monitoring of distant comet C/2002 VQ94 (LINEAR) was performed with the 6-m telescope of SAO RAS and with the 2.5-m Nordic Optical Telescope between 2008 and 2013. During this period the comet was on the outbound segment of its orbit, between heliocentric distances of 8.36 au and 16.84 au. Analysis of the spectra revealed the presence of the CO$^+$ and N$_2^+$ emissions in the cometary coma at a distance of 8.36 au from the Sun. This distance is larger than ionic emissions have been detected in any previous objects. Only continuum, with no traces of emissions, was detected in the spectrum obtained in 2009 when the comet was at a distance of 9.86 au. From the spectra obtained in 2008, average column densities of 2.04$\times$10$^9$ mol cm$^{-2}$ for N$_2^+$ and 3.26$\times$10$^{10}$ mol cm$^{-2}$ for CO$^+$ were measured in the cometary coma. The derived values correspond to N$_2^+$/CO$^+$=0.06 within the projected slit. The parameter, which is used as an indicator of cometary activity, was measured as 2000 cm in 2008, and 800 cm in 2009 and 2011. The values correspond to dust production rates between 10-20 kg s$^{-1}$, 4-6 kg s$^{-1}$ and 3-5 kg s$^{-1}$ at 8.36, 9.86, and 13.40 au respectively. There is an obvious correlation between the decrease of the dust production rate of the nucleus and the disappearance of the emissions in the spectrum of C/2002 VQ94 (LINEAR) at heliocentric distances greater than 9 au. The colors and size of the nucleus of C/2002 VQ94 (LINEAR) were estimated from the images obtained during the late stage at a heliocentric distance of 16.84 au, when the activity had probable ceased. The B-V and V-R colors were estimated to be 1.07$\pm$0.05 and 0.54$\pm$0.03 respectively. The effective nucleus radius of 48$\pm$2 km is in agreement with the previously published results, obtained from the observations of the comet during its early inactive stage.
  • We propose a scenario that explains the apparent nitrogen deficiency in comets in a way consistent with the fact that the surfaces of Pluto and Triton are dominated by nitrogen-rich ice. We use a statistical thermodynamic model to investigate the composition of the successive multiple guest clathrates that may have formed during the cooling of the primordial nebula from the most abundant volatiles present in the gas phase. These clathrates agglomerated with the other ices (pure condensates or stoichiometric hydrates) and formed the building blocks of comets. We report that molecular nitrogen is a poor clathrate former, when we consider a plausible gas phase composition of the primordial nebula. This implies that its trapping into cometesimals requires a low disk temperature ($\sim$20 K) in order to allow the formation of its pure condensate. We find that it is possible to explain the lack of molecular nitrogen in comets as a consequence of their postformation internal heating engendered by the decay of short-lived radiogenic nuclides. This scenario is found consistent with the presence of nitrogen-rich ice covers on Pluto and Triton. Our model predicts that comets should present xenon-to-water and krypton-to-water ratios close to solar xenon-to-oxygen and krypton-to-oxygen ratios, respectively. In contrast, the argon-to-water ratio is predicted to be depleted by a factor of $\sim$300 in comets compared to solar argon-to-oxygen, as a consequence of poor trapping efficiency and radiogenic heating.
  • Dwarf-planet (1) Ceres is one of the two targets, along with (4) Vesta, that will be studied by the NASA Dawn spacecraft via imaging, visible and near-infrared spectroscopy, and gamma-ray and neutron spectroscopy. While Ceres' visible and near-infrared disk-integrated spectra have been well characterized, little has been done about quantifying spectral variations over the surface. Any spectral variation would give us insights on the geographical variation of the composition and/or the surface age. The only work so far was that of Rivkin & Volquardsen (2010, Icarus 206, 327) who reported rotationally-resolved spectroscopic (disk-integrated) observations in the 2.2-4.0 {\mu}m range; their observations showed evidence for a relatively uniform surface. Here, we report disk-resolved observations of Ceres with SINFONI (ESO VLT) in the 1.17-1.32 {\mu}m and 1.45-2.35 {\mu}m wavelength ranges. The observations were made under excellent seeing conditions (0.6"), allowing us to reach a spatial resolution of ~75 km on Ceres' surface. We do not find any spectral variation above a 3% level, suggesting a homogeneous surface at our spatial resolution. Slight variations (about 2%) of the spectral slope are detected, geographically correlated with the albedo markings reported from the analysis of the HST and Keck disk-resolved images of Ceres (Li et al., 2006, Icarus 182, 143; Carry et al., 2008, A&A 478, 235). Given the lack of constraints on the surface composition of Ceres, however, we cannot assert the causes of these variations.