• One of the largest sources of uncertainty in stellar models is caused by the treatment of convection in stellar envelopes. One dimensional stellar models often make use of the mixing length or equivalent approximations to describe convection, all of which depend on various free parameters. There have been attempts to rectify this by using 3D radiative-hydrodynamic simulations of stellar convection, and in trying to extract an equivalent mixing length from the simulations. In this paper we show that the entropy of the deeper, adiabatic layers in these simulations can be expressed as a simple function of og g and log T_{eff} which holds potential for calibrating stellar models in a simple and more general manner.
  • In an effort to better understand the details of the stellar structure and evolution of metal poor stars, the Gemini North telescope was used on two occasions to take speckle imaging data of a sample of known spectroscopic binary stars and other nearby stars in order to search for and resolve close companions. The observations were obtained using the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument, which takes data in two filters simultaneously. The results presented here are of 90 observations of 23 systems in which one or more companions was detected, and 6 stars where no companion was detected to the limit of the camera capabilities at Gemini. In the case of the binary and multiple stars, these results are then further analyzed to make first orbit determinations in five cases, and orbit refinements in four other cases. Mass information is derived, and since the systems span a range in metallicity, a study is presented that compares our results with the expected trend in total mass as derived from the most recent Yale isochrones as a function of metal abundance. These data suggest that metal-poor main-sequence stars are less massive at a given color than their solar-metallicity analogues in a manner consistent with that predicted from the theory.
  • We present direct radii measurements of the well-known transiting exoplanet host stars HD 189733 and HD 209458 using the CHARA Array interferometer. We find the limb-darkened angular diameters to be theta_LD = 0.3848 +/- 0.0055 and 0.2254 +/- 0.0072 milliarcsec for HD 189733 and HD 209458, respectively. HD 189733 and HD 209458 are currently the only two transiting exoplanet systems where detection of the respective planetary companion's orbital motion from high resolution spectroscopy has revealed absolute masses for both star and planet. We use our new measurements together with the orbital information from radial velocity and photometric time series data, Hipparcos distances, and newly measured bolometric fluxes to determine the stellar effective temperatures (T_eff = 4875 +/- 43, 6093 +/- 103 K), stellar linear radii (R_* = 0.805 +/- 0.016, 1.203 +/- 0.061 R_sun), mean stellar densities (rho_* = 1.62 +/- 0.11, 0.58 +/- 0.14 rho_sun), planetary radii (R_p = 1.216 +/- 0.024, 1.451 +/- 0.074 R_Jup), and mean planetary densities (rho_p = 0.605 +/- 0.029, 0.196 +/- 0.033 rho_Jup) for HD 189733 b and HD 209458 b, respectively. The stellar parameters for HD 209458, a F9 dwarf, are consistent with indirect estimates derived from spectroscopic and evolutionary modeling. However, we find that models are unable to reproduce the observational results for the K2 dwarf, HD 189733. We show that, for stellar evolutionary models to match the observed stellar properties of HD 189733, adjustments lowering the solar-calibrated mixing length parameter from 1.83 to 1.34 need to be employed.
  • Mixing length theory is the predominant treatment of convection in stellar models today. Usually described by a single free parameter, alpha, the common practice is to calibrate it using the properties of the Sun, and apply it to all other stellar models as well. Asteroseismic data from Kepler and CoRoT provide precise properties of other stars which can be used to determine alpha as well, and a recent study of stars in the Kepler field of view found alpha to vary with metallicity. Interpreting alpha obtained from calibrated stellar models, however, is complicated by the fact that the value for alpha depends on the surface boundary condition of the stellar model, or T-tau relation. Calibrated models that use typical T-tau relations, which are static and insensitive to chemical composition, do not include the complete effect of metallicity on alpha. We use 3D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations to extract metallicity-dependent T-tau relations and use them in calibrated stellar models. We find the previously reported alpha-metallicity trend to be robust, and not significantly affected by the surface boundary condition of the stellar models.
  • We investigate the effect of helium abundance and $\alpha$-element enhancement on the properties of convection in envelopes of solar-like main-sequence stars stars using a grid of 3D radiation hydrodynamic simulations. Helium abundance increases the mean molecular weight of the gas, and alters opacity by displacing hydrogen. Since the scale of the effect of helium may depend on the metallicity, the grid consists of simulations with three helium abundances ($Y=0.1, 0.2, 0.3$), each with two metallicities ($Z=0.001, 0.020)$. We find that changing the helium mass fraction generally affects structure and convective dynamics in a way opposite to that of metallicity. Furthermore, the effect is considerably smaller than that of metallicity. The signature of helium differs from that of metallicity in the manner in which the photospheric velocity distribution is affected. \rev{We also find that helium abundance and surface gravity behave largely in similar ways, but differ in the way they affect the mean molecular weight}. A simple model for spectral line formation suggests that the bisectors and absolute Doppler shifts of spectral lines depends on the helium abundance. We look at the effect of $\alpha$-element enhancement and find that it has a considerably smaller effect on the convective dynamics in the SAL compared to that of helium abundance.
  • We examine how metallicity affects convection and overshoot in the superadiabatic layer of main sequence stars. We present results from a grid of 3D radiation hydrodynamic simulations with four metallicities ($Z=0.040$, 0.020, 0.010, 0.001), and spanning a range in effective temperature ($4950 < \rm T_{\rm eff} < 6230$). We show that changing the metallicity alters properties of the convective gas dynamics, and the structure of the superadiabatic layer and atmosphere. Our grid of simulations show that the amount of superadiabaticity, which tracks the transition from efficient to inefficient convection, \rev{is sensitive to changes in metallicity. We find that increasing the metallicity forces the location of the transition region to lower densities and pressures, and results in larger mean and turbulent velocities throughout the superadiabatic region.} We also quantify the degree of convective overshoot in the atmosphere, and show that it increases with metallicity as well.
  • We examine the effect of different radiative transfer schemes on the properties of 3D simulations of near-surface stellar convection in the superadiabatic layer, where energy transport transitions from fully convective to fully radiative. We employ two radiative transfer schemes that fundamentally differ in the way they cover the 3D domain. The first solver approximates domain coverage with moments, while the second solver samples the 3D domain with ray integrations. By comparing simulations that differ only in their respective radiative transfer methods, we are able to isolate the effect that radiative efficiency has on the structure of the superadiabatic layer. We find the simulations to be in good general agreement, but they show distinct differences in the thermal structure in the superadiabatic layer and atmosphere.
  • We present models of the components of the systems KOI-126 and CM Draconis, the two eclipsing binary systems known to date to contain stars with masses low enough to have fully convective interiors. We are able to model satisfactorily the system KOI-126, finding consistent solutions for the radii and surface temperatures of all three components, using a solar-like value of the mixing-length parameter \alpha in the convection zone, and PHOENIX NextGen 1D model atmospheres for the surface boundary conditions. Depending on the chemical composition, we estimate the age of the system to be in the range 3-5 Gyr. For CM Draconis, on the other hand, we cannot reconcile our models with the observed radii and T_eff using the current metal-poor composition estimate based on kinematics. Higher metallicities lessen but do not remove the discrepancy. We then explore the effect of varying the mixing length parameter \alpha. As previously noted in the literature, a reduced \alpha can be used as a simple measure of the lower convective efficiency due to rotation and induced magnetic fields. Our models show a sensitivity to \alpha (for \alpha < 1.0) sufficient to partially account for the radius discrepancies. It is, however, impossible to reconcile the models with the observations on the basis of the effect of the reduced \alpha alone. We therefore suggest that the combined effects of high metallicity and \alpha reduction could explain the observations of CM Draconis. For example, increasing the metallicity of the system towards super-solar values (i.e. Z = 2 Z_sun) yields an agreement within 2 \sigma with \alpha = 1.0.
  • We have analysed oscillations of the red giant star HD 186355 observed by the NASA Kepler satellite. The data consist of the first five quarters of science operations of Kepler, which cover about 13 months. The high-precision time-series data allow us to accurately extract the oscillation frequencies from the power spectrum. We find the frequency of the maximum oscillation power, {\nu}_max, and the mean large frequency separation, {\Delta}{\nu}, are around 106 and 9.4 {\mu}Hz respectively. A regular pattern of radial and non-radial oscillation modes is identified by stacking the power spectra in an echelle diagram. We use the scaling relations of {\Delta}{\nu} and {\nu}_max to estimate the preliminary asteroseismic mass, which is confirmed with the modelling result (M = 1.45 \pm 0.05 M_sun) using the Yale Rotating stellar Evolution Code (YREC7). In addition, we constrain the effective temperature, luminosity and radius from comparisons between observational constraints and models. A number of mixed l = 1 modes are also detected and taken into account in our model comparisons. We find a mean observational period spacing for these mixed modes of about 58 s, suggesting that this red giant branch star is in the shell hydrogen-burning phase.
  • Asteroseismology of stars in clusters has been a long-sought goal because the assumption of a common age, distance and initial chemical composition allows strong tests of the theory of stellar evolution. We report results from the first 34 days of science data from the Kepler Mission for the open cluster NGC 6819 -- one of four clusters in the field of view. We obtain the first clear detections of solar-like oscillations in the cluster red giants and are able to measure the large frequency separation and the frequency of maximum oscillation power. We find that the asteroseismic parameters allow us to test cluster-membership of the stars, and even with the limited seismic data in hand, we can already identify four possible non-members despite their having a better than 80% membership probability from radial velocity measurements. We are also able to determine the oscillation amplitudes for stars that span about two orders of magnitude in luminosity and find good agreement with the prediction that oscillation amplitudes scale as the luminosity to the power of 0.7. These early results demonstrate the unique potential of asteroseismology of the stellar clusters observed by Kepler.
  • We extend the analysis of Penev et al. (2007) to calculate effective viscosities for the surface convective zones of three main sequence stars of 0.775Msun, 0.85Msun and the present day Sun. In addition we also pay careful attention to all normalization factors and assumptions in order to derive actual numerical prescriptions for the effective viscosity as a function of the period and direction of the external shear. Our results are applicable for periods that are too long to correspond to eddies that fall within the inertial subrange of Kolmogorov scaling, but no larger than the convective turnover time, when the assumptions of the calculation break down. We find linear scaling of effective viscosity with period and magnitudes at least three times larger than the Zahn (1966, 1989) prescription.
  • We compute the p-mode oscillation frequencies and frequency splittings that arise in a two-dimensional model of the Sun that contains toroidal magnetic fields in its interior.
  • We report on a new, wide field ($20^{\prime} \times 20^{\prime}$), multicolor ($UBVI$), photometric campaign in the area of the nearby old open cluster NGC 2112. At the same time, we provide medium-resolution spectroscopy of 35 (and high-resolution of additional 5) Red Giant and Turn Off stars. This material is analyzed with the aim to update the fundamental parameters of this traditionally difficult cluster, which is very sparse and suffers from heavy field star contamination. Among the 40 stars with spectra, we identified 21 {\it bona fide} radial velocity members which allow us to put more solid constraints on the cluster's metal abundance, long suggested to be as low as the metallicity of globulars. As indicated earlier by us on a purely photometric basis (Carraro et al. 2002), the cluster [Fe/H] abundance is slightly super-solar ([Fe/H] =0.16$\pm$0.03) and close to the Hyades value, as inferred from a detailed abundance analysis of 3 of the 5 stars with higher resolution spectra. Abundance ratios are also marginally super solar. Based on this result, we revise the properties of NGC 2112 using stellar models from the Padova and Yale-Yonsei groups. For this metal abundance, we find the cluster's age, reddening, and distance values are 1.8 Gyr, 0.60 mag, and 940 pc, respectively. Both the Yale-Yonsei and Padova models predict the same values for the fundamental parameters within the errors. Overall, NGC 2112 is a typical solar neighborhood, thin disk star cluster, sharing the same chemical properties of F-G stars and open clusters close to the Sun. This investigation outlines the importance of a detailed membership analysis in the study of disk star clusters.
  • AIMS: The cluster of hot stars observed in orbit around the central black hole of M31 has been interpreted as a 200 Myr starburst. The formation of a population of young stars in close proximity to a massive black hole presents a difficult challenge to star formation theory. We point out that in a high stellar density environment, the course of stellar evolution is modified by frequent collisions and mergers. METHODS: Blue stragglers, which are the results of mergers in globular clusters, occupy the same position in the color-magnitude diagram as the observed hot stars in M31. For confirmation, the integrated spectrum of P3 is shown to be compatible with the spectral energy distribution of a blue horizontal branch field star. RESULTS: We suggest an old stellar population of evolved blue horizontal-branch stars and of merger products cannot be ruled out on the basis of the available data. Observations are suggested that would help distinguish between a ``young'' and ``old'' stellar population interpretation of the observations.
  • We present a detailed study of the small frequency separations as diagnostics of the mass of the convective core and evolutionary stage of solar-type stars. We demonstrate how the small separations can be combined to provide sensitive tests for the presence of convective overshoot at the edge of the core. These studies are focused on low degree oscillation modes, the only modes expected to be detected in distant stars. Using simulated data with realistic errors, we find that the mass of the convective core can be estimated to within 5% if the total stellar mass is known. Systematic errors arising due to uncertainty in the mass could be up to 20%. The evolutionary stage of the star, determined in terms of the central hydrogen abundance using our proposed technique, however, is much less sensitive to the mass estimate.
  • We report on high resolution Echelle spectroscopy of 20 giant stars in the Galactic old open clusters NGC 6791 obtained with Hydra at the WIYN telescope. High precision radial velocity allow us to isolate 15 {\it bona fide} cluster members. From 10 of them we derive a global [M/H]=+0.39$\pm$0.05. We therefore confirm that NGC 6791 is extremely metal rich, exhibits a few marginally sub-solar abundance ratios, and within the resolution of our spectra does not show evidences of spread in metal abundance. With these new data we re-derive the cluster fundamental parameters suggesting that it is about 8 Gyr old and 4.3 kpc far from the Sun. The combination of its chemical properties, age, position, and Galactic orbit hardly makes NGC 6791 a genuine Population I open cluster. We discuss possible interpretations of the cluster peculiarities suggesting that the cluster might be what remains of a much larger system, whose initial potential well could have been sufficient to produce high metallicity stars, and which has been depopulated by the tidal field of the Galaxy. Alternatively, its current properties may be explained by the perturbation of the Galactic bar on an object originated well inside the solar ring, where the metal enrichment had been very fast.
  • We show in this paper that the changes of the solar diameter in response to variations of large scale magnetic fields and turbulence are not homologous. For the best current model, the variation at the photospheric level is over 1000 times larger than the variation at a depth of 5 Mm, which is about the level at which f-mode solar oscillations determine diameter variations. This model is supported by observations that indicate larger diameter changes for high degree f-modes than for low degree f-modes, since energy of the former are concentrated at shallower layers than the latter.
  • Recent observations for the color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of the massive globular cluster Omega Centauri have shown that it has a striking double main sequence (MS), with a minority population of bluer and fainter MS well separated from a majority population of MS stars. Here we confirm, with the most up-to-date Y2 isochrones, that this special feature can only be reproduced by assuming a large variation (Delta Y = 0.15) of primordial helium abundance among several distinct populations in this cluster. We further show that the same helium enhancement required for this special feature on the MS can by itself reproduce the extreme horizontal-branch (HB) stars observed in Omega Cen, which are hotter than normal HB stars. Similarly, the complex features on the HBs of other globular clusters, such as NGC 2808, are explained by large internal variations of helium abundance. Supporting evidence for the helium-rich population is also provided by the far-UV (FUV) observations of extreme HB stars in these clusters, where the enhancement of helium can naturally explain the observed fainter FUV luminosity for these stars. The presence of super helium-rich populations in some globular clusters suggests that the third parameter, other than metallicity and age, also influences CMD morphology of these clusters.
  • Convective core overshoot affects stellar evolution rates and the dating of stellar populations. In this paper, we provide a patch to the $Y^2$ isochrones with an improved treatment of convective core overshoot. The new tracks cover the transition mass range from no convective core to a fully developed convective core. We compare the improved isochrones to CMDs of a few well observed open star clusters in the Galaxy and the Large Magellanic Cloud. Finally we discuss future prospects for improving the treatment of core overshoot with the help of asteroseismology.
  • Intermediate degree modes of the solar oscillations have previously been used to determine the solar helium abundance to a high degree of precision. However, we cannot expect to observe such modes in other stars. In this work we investigate whether low degree modes that should be available from space-based asteroseismology missions can be used to determine the helium abundance, Y, in stellar envelopes with sufficient precision. We find that the oscillatory signal in the frequencies caused by the depression in \Gamma_1 in the second helium ionisation zone can be used to determine the envelope helium abundance of low mass main sequence stars. For frequency errors of 1 part in 10^4, we expect errors \sigma_Y in the estimated helium abundance to range from 0.03 for 0.8M_sun stars to 0.01 for 1.2M_sun stars. The task is more complicated in evolved stars, such as subgiants, but is still feasible if the relative errors in the frequencies are less than 10^{-4}.
  • We present a database of the latest stellar models of the $Y^2$ (Yonsei-Yale) collaboration. This database contains the stellar evolutionary tracks from the pre-main-sequence birthline to the helium core flash that were used to construct the $Y^2$ isochrones. We also provide a simple interpolation routine that generates stellar tracks for given sets of parameters (metallicity, mass, and $\alpha$-enhancement).
  • We present a new set of isochrones in which the effect of the alpha-element enhancement is fully incorporated. These isochrones are an extension of the already published set of YY Isochrones (Yi et al. 2001: Paper 1), constructed for the scaled-solar mixture. As in Paper 1, helium diffusion and convective core overshoot have been taken into account.The range of chemical compositions covered is 0.00001 < Z < 0.08. The models were evolved from the pre-main-sequence stellar birthline to the onset of helium burning in the core. The age range of the full isochrone set is 0.1 -- 20 Gyr, while younger isochrones of age 1 -- 80 Myr are also presented up to the main-sequence turn-off. Combining this set with that of Paper 1 for scaled-solar mixture isochrones, we provide a consistent set of isochrones which can be used to investigate populations of any value of alpha-enhancement. We confirm the earlier results of Paper 1 that inclusion of alpha-enhancement effects further reduces the age estimates of globular clusters by approximately 8 percent if [alpha/Fe]=+0.3. It is important to note the metallicity dependence of the change in age estimates (larger age reductions in lower metallicities). This reduces the age gap between the oldest metal-rich and metal-poor Galactic stellar populations and between the halo and the disk populations. The isochrone tables, together with interpolation routines have been made available via internet; http://www.astro.yale.edu/demarque/yyiso.html http://www-astro.physics.ox.ac.uk/~yi/yyiso.html http://csaweb.yonsei.ac.kr/~kim/yyiso.html
  • A grid of synthetic horizontal-branch (SHB) models based on HB evolutionary tracks with improved physics has been constructed to reconsider the theoretical calibration of the dependence of M_v(RR) on metallicity in globular clusters, and the slope of the mean <M_v(RR)>-[Fe/H] relation. The SHB models confirm Lee's earlier finding (Lee 1991) that the slope of the <M_v(RR)>-[Fe/H] relation is itself a function of the metallicity range considered, and that in addition, for a given [Fe/H], RR Lyrae luminosities depend on HB morphology. This is due to the fact that HB stars pass through the RR Lyrae instability strip at different evolutionary stages, depending on their original position on the HB. At [Fe/H]=-1.9, and for HB type 0, the models yield M_v(RR)=0.47 \pm 0.10. The mean slope for the zero-age HB models is 0.204. Since there is no simple universal relation between M_v(RR) and metallicity that is applicable to all globular clusters, the HB morphology of each individual cluster must be taken into account, in addition to [Fe/H], in deriving the appropriate M_v(RR). Taking HB morphology into account, we find that the slope of the mean <M_v(RR)>-[Fe/H] relation varies between 0.36 for the clusters with galactocentric distances R_gc less than 6 kpc and 0.22 for clusters with 6<R_gc<20 kpc. Implications for interpreting observations of field RR Lyrae variables and for absolute globular cluster ages and galactic chronology are briefly discussed.
  • We present a review of the present state of knowledge regarding the relative ages of Galactic globular clusters. First, we discuss the relevant galaxy formation models and describe the detailed predictions they make with respect to the formation timescale and chemical evolution of the globular clusters. Next, the techniques used to estimate globular cluster ages are described and evaluated with particular emphasis on the advantages and disadvantages of each method. With these techniques as a foundation, we present arguments in favor of the following assertions: 1) The age of a globular cluster is the likeliest candidate to be the global second parameter, which along with metal abundance, controls the morphology of the horizonal branch. 2) A total age range of as much as $\sim$5 Gyr exists among the bulk of the Galactic globulars. 3) There is a significant relation between age and metallicity among the Galactic globular clusters if the slope of the \mvrr-\feh relation is less than $\sim$0.23. These conclusions along with other supporting evidence favor a formation scenario in which the inner regions of the Galactic halo collapsed in a monotonic fashion over a short time period much less than 1 Gyr. In contrast, the outer regions of the halo fragmented and collapsed in a chaotic manner over several Gyrs.
  • We explore the evolution of collisionally merged stars in the blue straggler region of the HR diagram. The starting models for our stellar evolution calculations are the results of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of parabolic collisions between main sequence stars performed by Lombardi, Rasio and Shapiro (1996). Since SPH and stellar evolution codes employ different and often contradictory approximations, it is necessary to treat the evolution of these products carefully. The mixture and disparity of the relevant timescales (hydrodynamic, thermal relaxation and nuclear burning) and of the important physical assumptions between the codes makes the combined analysis of the problem challenging, especially during the initial thermal relaxation of the star. In particular, the treatment of convection is important, and semiconvection must be modeled in some detail. The products of seven head-on collisions are evolved through their initial thermal relaxation, and then through the main sequence phase to the base of the giant branch. Their evolutionary tracks are presented. In contrast to the assumptions in previous work, these collision products do not develop substantial convective regions during their thermal relaxation, and therefore are not mixed significantly after the collision.