• Protein misfolding is implicated in many diseases, including the serpinopathies. For the canonical inhibitory serpin {\alpha}1-antitrypsin (A1AT), mutations can result in protein deficiencies leading to lung disease, and misfolded mutants can accumulate in hepatocytes leading to liver disease. Using all-atom simulations based on the recently developed Bias Functional algorithm we elucidate how wild-type A1AT folds and how the disease-associated S (Glu264Val) and Z (Glu342Lys) mutations lead to misfolding. The deleterious Z mutation disrupts folding at an early stage, while the relatively benign S mutant shows late stage minor misfolding. A number of suppressor mutations ameliorate the effects of the Z mutation and simulations on these mutants help to elucidate the relative roles of steric clashes and electrostatic interactions in Z misfolding. These results demonstrate a striking correlation between atomistic events and disease severity and shine light on the mechanisms driving chains away from their correct folding routes.
  • Dimensional analysis reveals general kinematic scaling rules for the momentum, mass, and energy dependence of Drell-Yan and quarkonium cross sections. Their application to mid-rapidity LHC data provides strong experimental evidence supporting the validity of the factorization ansatz, a cornerstone of non-relativistic QCD, still lacking theoretical demonstration. Moreover, data-driven patterns emerge for the factorizable long-distance bound-state formation effects, including a remarkable correlation between the S-wave quarkonium cross sections and their binding energies. Assuming that this scaling can be extended to the P-wave case, we obtain precise predictions for the not yet measured feed-down fractions, thereby providing a complete picture of the charmonium and bottomonium feed-down structure. This is crucial information for quantitative interpretations of quarkonium production data, including studies of the suppression patterns measured in nucleus-nucleus collisions.
  • A global analysis of ATLAS and CMS measurements reveals that, at mid-rapidity, the directly-produced $\chi_{c1}$, $\chi_{c2}$ and J/$\psi$ mesons have differential cross sections of seemingly identical shapes, when presented as a function of the mass-rescaled transverse momentum, $p_{\rm T}/M$. This identity of kinematic behaviours among S- and P-wave quarkonia is certainly not a natural expectation of non-relativistic QCD (NRQCD), where each quarkonium state is supposed to reflect a specific family of elementary production processes, of significantly different $p_{\rm T}$-differential cross sections. Remarkably, accurate kinematic cancellations among the variegated NRQCD terms (colour singlets and octets) of its factorization expansion can lead to a surprisingly good description of the data. This peculiar tuning of the NRQCD mixtures leads to a clear prediction regarding the $\chi_{c1}$ and $\chi_{c2}$ polarizations, the only observables not yet measured: they should be almost maximally different from one another, and from the J/$\psi$ polarization, a striking exception in the global panorama of quarkonium production. Measurements of the difference between the $\chi_{c1}$, $\chi_{c2}$ and J/$\psi$ polarizations, complementing the observed identity of momentum dependences, represent a decisive probe of NRQCD.
  • The LHC quarkonium production measurements reveal a startling observation: the J/$\psi$, $\psi$(2S), $\chi_{c1,2}$ and $\Upsilon$(nS) $p_{\rm T}$-differential cross sections are compatible with one universal momentum scaling pattern. Considering also the absence of strong polarizations of directly and indirectly produced S-wave mesons, we are led to the conclusion that there is currently no evidence of a dependence of the partonic production mechanisms on the quantum numbers and mass of the final state. The experimental observations supporting this universal production scenario are remarkably significant, as shown by a new analysis approach, unbiased by specific theoretical calculations of partonic cross sections, which are only considered a posteriori, in comparisons with the data-driven results.
  • While non-relativistic QCD (NRQCD) foresees a variety of elementary quarkonium production mechanisms naturally leading to state-dependent kinematic patterns, the LHC cross sections and polarization measurements reveal a remarkably simple production scenario, independent of the quantum numbers and masses of the quarkonia. Surprisingly, NRQCD is able to accommodate the observed universal scenario, through a series of conspiring cancellations smoothing out its otherwise variegated hierarchy of mechanisms. This seemingly unnatural solution implies that the $\chi_{c1}$ and $\chi_{c2}$ polarizations, not yet measured, are strong and opposite, representing the only potential exception to a remarkably simple picture of quarkonium production. The observation of a large difference between $\chi_{c2}$ and $\chi_{c1}$ polarizations, which cannot be indirectly extracted from existing measurements because they mutually cancel each other in their contribution to the observed J/$\psi$ production, would be a smoking gun signal finally proving the multifaceted but mysteriously elusive structure of NRQCD. On the other hand, the measurement of two similar, small polarizations will urge improved P-wave calculations, if not a substantial revision of the NRQCD hierarchies.
  • Renormalization Group (RG) theory provides the theoretical framework to define Effective Theories (ETs), i.e. systematic low-resolution approximations of arbitrary microscopic models. Markov State Models (MSMs) are shown to be rigorous ETs for Molecular Dynamics (MD). Based on this fact, we use Real Space RG to vary the resolution of a MSM and define an algorithm for clustering microstates into macrostates. The result is a lower dimensional stochastic model which, by construction, provides the optimal coarse-grained Markovian representation of the system's relaxation kinetics. To illustrate and validate our theory, we analyze a number of test systems of increasing complexity, ranging from synthetic toy models to two realistic applications, built form all-atom MD simulations. The computational cost of computing the low-dimensional model remains affordable on a desktop computer even for thousands of microstates.
  • We present a comprehensive approach to the dynamics of heavy quarks in a quark gluon plasma, including the possibility of bound state formation and dissociation. In this exploratory paper, we restrict ourselves to the case of an Abelian plasma, but the extension of the techniques used to the non Abelian case is straightforward. A chain of well defined approximations leads eventually to a generalized Langevin equation, where the force and the noise terms are determined from a correlation function of the equilibrium plasma, and depend explicitly on the configuration of the heavy quarks. We solve the Langevin equation for various initial conditions, various numbers of heavy quark-antiquark pairs, and various temperatures of the plasma. Results of simulations illustrate various expected phenomena: dissociation of bound states as a result of combined effects of screening of the potential and collisions with the plasma constituent, formation of bound pairs (recombination) that occurs when enough heavy quarks are present in the system.
  • Polarization measurements are usually considered as the most difficult challenge for the QCD description of quarkonium production. In fact, global data fits for the determination of the non-perturbative parameters of bound-state formation traditionally exclude polarization observables and use them as a posteriori verifications of the predictions, with perplexing results. With a change of perspective, we move polarization data to the centre of the study, advocating that they actually provide the strongest fundamental indications about the production mechanisms, even before we explicitly consider perturbative calculations. Considering psi(2S) and Y(3S) measurements from LHC experiments and state-of-the-art NLO short-distance calculations in the framework of non-relativistic QCD factorization (NRQCD), we perform a search for a kinematic domain where the polarizations can be correctly reproduced together with the cross sections, by systematically scanning the phase space and accurately treating the experimental uncertainties. This strategy provides a straightforward solution to the "quarkonium polarization puzzle" and reassuring signs that the theoretical framework is reliable. At the same time, the results expose unexpected hierarchies in the non-perturbative NRQCD parameters, that open new paths towards the understanding of bound-state formation in QCD.
  • The angular distribution of the two-body decay of a boson of unknown properties is strongly constrained by angular momentum conservation and rotation invariance, as well as by the nature of the detected decay particles and of the colliding ones. Knowing the border between the "physical" and "unphysical" parameter domains defined by these "minimal constraints" (excluding specific hypotheses on what is still subject of measurement) is a useful ingredient in the experimental determinations of angular distributions and can provide model-independent criteria for spin characterizations. In particular, analysing the angular decay distribution with the general parametrization for the J = 2 case can provide a model-independent discrimination between the J = 0 and J = 2 hypotheses for a particle produced by two real gluons and decaying into two real photons.
  • We report on atomistic simulation of the folding of a natively-knotted protein, MJ0366, based on a realistic force field. To the best of our knowledge this is the first reported effort where a realistic force field is used to investigate the folding pathways of a protein with complex native topology. By using the dominant-reaction pathway scheme we collected about 30 successful folding trajectories for the 82-amino acid long trefoil-knotted protein. Despite the dissimilarity of their initial unfolded configuration, these trajectories reach the natively-knotted state through a remarkably similar succession of steps. In particular it is found that knotting occurs essentially through a threading mechanism, involving the passage of the C-terminal through an open region created by the formation of the native beta-sheet at an earlier stage. The dominance of the knotting by threading mechanism is not observed in MJ0366 folding simulations using simplified, native-centric models. This points to a previously underappreciated role of concerted amino acid interactions, including non-native ones, in aiding the appropriate order of contact formation to achieve knotting.
  • Topological phenomena in gauge theories have long been recognized as the driving force for chiral symmetry breaking and confinement. These phenomena can be conveniently investigated in the semi-classical picture, in which the topological charge is entirely carried by (anti-)self-dual gauge configurations. In such an approach, it has been shown that near the critical temperature, the non-zero expectation value of the Polyakov loop (holonomy) triggers the "Higgsing" of the color group, generating the splitting of instantons into $N_c$ self-dual dyons. A number of lattice simulations have provided some evidence for such dyons, and traced their relation with specific observables, such as the Dirac eigenvalue spectrum. In this work, we formulate a model, based on one-loop partition function and including Coulomb interaction, screening and fermion zee modes. We then perform the first numerical Monte Carlo simulations of a statistical ensemble of self-dual dyons,as a function of their density, quark mass and the number of flavors. We study different dyonic two-point correlation functions and we compute the Dirac spectrum, as a function of the ensemble diluteness and the number of quark flavors.
  • Polarization measurements are the best instrument to understand how quark and antiquark combine into the different quarkonium states, but no model has so far succeeded in explaining the measured J/psi and Upsilon polarizations. On the other hand, the experimental data in proton-antiproton and proton-nucleus collisions are inconsistent, incomplete and ambiguous. New analyses will have to properly address often underestimated issues: the existence of azimuthal anisotropies, the dependence on the reference frame, the influence of the experimental acceptance on the comparison with other measurements and with theory. Additionally, a recently developed frame-invariant formalism will provide an alternative and often more immediate physical viewpoint and, at the same time, will help probing systematic effects due to experimental biases. The role of feed-down decays from heavier states, a crucial missing piece in the current experimental knowledge, will have to be investigated. Ultimately, quarkonium polarization measurements will also offer new possibilities in the study of the properties of the quark-gluon plasma.
  • We demonstrate that it is possible to use the polarization of vector quarkonia, measured from dilepton event samples, as an instrument to study the suppression of chi_c and chi_b in heavy-ion collisions, where a direct determination of signal yields involving the identification of low-energy photons is essentially impossible. A change of the observed J/psi and Upsilon(1S) polarizations from proton-proton to central nucleus-nucleus collisions would directly reflect differences in the nuclear dissociation patterns of S and P states and may provide a strong indication for quarkonium sequential suppression in the quark-gluon plasma.
  • The internal dynamics of strongly interacting systems and that of biomolecules such as proteins display several important analogies, despite the huge difference in their characteristic energy and length scales. For example, in all such systems, collective excitations, cooperative transitions and phase transitions emerge as the result of the interplay of strong correlations with quantum or thermal fluctuations. In view of such an observation, some theoretical methods initially developed in the context of theoretical nuclear physics have been adapted to investigate the dynamics of biomolecules. In this talk, we review some of our recent studies performed along this direction. In particular, we discuss how the path integral formulation of the molecular dynamics allows to overcome some of the long-standing problems and limitations which emerge when simulating the protein folding dynamics at the atomistic level of detail.
  • A standard approach to investigate the non-perturbative QCD dynamics is through vacuum models which emphasize the role played by specific gauge field fluctuations, such as instantons, monopoles or vortexes. The effective Hamiltonian describing the dynamics of the low-energy degrees of freedom in such approaches is usually postulated phenomenologically, or obtained through uncontrolled approximations. In a recent paper, we have shown how lattice field theory simulations can be used to rigorously compute the effective Hamiltonian of arbitrary vacuum models by stochastically performing the path integral over all the vacuum field fluctuations which are not explicitly taken into account. In this work, we present the first illustrative application of such an approach to a gauge theory and we use it to compute the instanton size distribution in SU(2) gluon-dynamics in a fully model independent and parameter-free way.
  • The angular distributions of the decay products in the successive decays chi_c (chi_b) to J/psi (Upsilon) gamma and J/psi (Upsilon) to l+l- are calculated as a function of the angular momentum composition of the decaying chi meson and of the multipole structure of the photon radiation, using a formalism independent of production mechanisms and polarization frames. The polarizations of the chi states produced in high energy collisions can be derived from the dilepton decay distributions of the daughter J/psi or Upsilon mesons, with a reduced dependence on the details of the photon reconstruction or simulation. Moreover, this method eliminates the dependence of the polarization measurement on the actual details of the multipole structure of the radiative transition. Problematic points in previous calculations of the chi_c decay angular distributions are identified and clarified.
  • The coefficients determining the dilepton decay angular distribution of vector particles obey certain positivity constraints and a rotation-invariant identity. These relations are a direct consequence of the covariance properties of angular momentum eigenstates and are independent of the production mechanism. The Lam-Tung relation can be derived as a particular case, simply recognizing that the Drell-Yan dilepton is always produced transversely polarized with respect to one or more quantization axes. The dilepton angular distribution continues to be characterized by a frame-independent identity also when the Lam-Tung relation is violated. Moreover, the violation can be easily characterized by measuring a one-dimensional distribution depending on one shape coefficient.
  • The di-fermion angular distribution observed in decays of inclusively produced vector particles is characterized by two frame-independent observables, reflecting the average spin-alignment of the produced particle and the magnitude of parity violation in the decay. The existence of these observables derives from the rotational properties of angular momentum eigenstates and is a completely general result, valid for any J=1 state and independent of the production process. Rotation-invariant formulations of polarization and of the decay parity-asymmetry can provide more significant measurements than the commonly used frame-dependent definitions, also improving the quality of the comparisons between the measurements and the theoretical calculations.
  • The internal dynamics of macro-molecular systems is characterized by widely separated time scales, ranging from fraction of ps to ns. In ordinary molecular dynamics simulations, the elementary time step dt used to integrate the equation of motion needs to be chosen much smaller of the shortest time scale, in order not to cut-off important physical effects. We show that, in systems obeying the over-damped Langevin Eq., the fast molecular dynamics which occurs at time scales smaller than dt can be analytically integrated out and gives raise to a time-dependent correction to the diffusion coefficient, which we rigorously compute. The resulting effective Langevin equation describes by construction the same long-time dynamics, but has a lower time resolution power, hence it can be integrated using larger time steps dt. We illustrate and validate this method by studying the diffusion of a point-particle in a one-dimensional toy-model and the denaturation of a protein.
  • We highlight issues which are often underestimated in the experimental analyses on quarkonium polarization: the relation between the parameters of the angular distributions and the angular momentum composition of the quarkonium, the importance of the choice of the reference frame, the interplay between observed decay and production kinematics, and the consequent influence of the experimental acceptance on the comparison between experimental measurements and theoretical calculations. Given the puzzles raised by the available experimental results, new measurements must provide more detailed information, such that physical conclusions can be derived without relying on model-dependent assumptions. We describe a frame-invariant formalism which minimizes the dependence of the measurements on the experimental acceptance, facilitates the comparison with theoretical calculations, and probes systematic effects due to experimental biases. This formalism is a direct and generic consequence of the rotational invariance of the dilepton decay distribution and is independent of any assumptions specific to particular models of quarkonium production. The use of this improved approach, which exploits the intrinsic multidimensionality of the problem, will significantly contribute to a faster progress in our understanding of quarkonium production, especially if adopted as a common analysis framework by the LHC experiments, which will soon perform analyses of quarkonium polarization in proton-proton collisions.
  • Significant progress in understanding quarkonium production requires improved polarization measurements, fully considering the intrinsic multidimensionality of the problem. We propose a frame-invariant formalism which minimizes the dependence of the measured result on the experimental acceptance, facilitates the comparison with theoretical calculations, and provides a much needed control over systematic effects due to detector limitations and analysis biases. This formalism is a direct and generic consequence of the rotational invariance of the dilepton decay distribution and is independent of any assumptions specific to particular models of quarkonium production.
  • The rotational properties of angular momentum eigenstates imply the existence of a frame-independent relation among the parameters of the decay distribution of vector mesons into fermions. This relation is a generalization of the Lam-Tung identity, a result specific to Drell-Yan production in perturbative QCD, here shown to be equivalent to the dynamical condition that the dilepton always originates from a transversely polarized photon.
  • We use the Dominant Reaction Pathway (DRP) approach to study the dynamics of the folding of a beta-hairpin, within a model which accounts for both native and non-native interactions. We compare the most probable folding pathways calculated with the DRP method with those obtained directly from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We find that the two approaches give completely consistent results. We investigate the effects of the non-native hydrophobic interactions on the folding dynamics found them to be small.
  • The determination of the magnitude and "sign" of the J/psi polarization crucially depends on the reference frame used in the analysis of the data and a full understanding of the polarization phenomenon requires measurements reported in two "orthogonal" frames, such as the Collins-Soper and helicity frames. Moreover, the azimuthal anisotropy can be, in certain frames, as significant as the polar one. The seemingly contradictory J/psi polarization results reported by E866, HERA-B and CDF can be consistently described assuming that the most suitable axis for the measurement is along the direction of the relative motion of the colliding partons, and that directly produced J/psi's are longitudinally polarized at low momentum and transversely polarized at high momentum. We make specific predictions that can be tested on existing CDF data and by LHC measurements, which should show a full transverse polarization for direct J/psi mesons of pT > 25 GeV/c.
  • We consider the application of Kramers theory to the microscopic calculation of rates of conformational transitions of macromolecules. The main difficulty in such an approach is to locate the transition state in a huge configuration space. We present a method which identifies the transition state along the most probable reaction pathway. It is then possible to microscopically compute the activation energy, the damping coefficient, the eigenfrequencies at the transition state and obtain the rate, without any a-priori choice of a reaction coordinate. Our theoretical results are tested against the results of Molecular Dynamics simulations for transitions in a 2-dimensional double well and for the cis-trans isomerization of a linear molecule.