• Two well-known turbulence models that describe the energy spectrum in the inertial and dissipative ranges simultaneously are by Pao~(1965) and Pope~(2000). In this paper, we compute the energy spectrum $E(k)$ and energy flux $\Pi(k)$ using direct numerical simulations on grids up to $4096^3$, and show consistency between the numerical results and the predictions by the aforementioned models. We also construct a model for laminar flows that predicts $E(k)\sim k^{-1} \exp(-k)$ and $\Pi(k)\sim k \exp(-k)$. Our model predictions match with the numerical results. We emphasize differences on the energy transfers in the two flows---they are {\em local} in the turbulent flows, and {\em nonlocal} in laminar flows.
  • ProbNetKAT is a probabilistic extension of NetKAT with a denotational semantics based on Markov kernels. The language is expressive enough to generate continuous distributions, which raises the question of how to compute effectively in the language. This paper gives an new characterization of ProbNetKAT's semantics using domain theory, which provides the foundation needed to build a practical implementation. We show how to use the semantics to approximate the behavior of arbitrary ProbNetKAT programs using distributions with finite support. We develop a prototype implementation and show how to use it to solve a variety of problems including characterizing the expected congestion induced by different routing schemes and reasoning probabilistically about reachability in a network.
  • The presence of bifurcation of the Kirkendall marker plane, a very special phenomenon discovered recently, is found in a technologically important Cu Sn system. It was predicted based on estimated diffusion coefficients; however, could not be detected following the conventional inert marker experiments. As reported in this study, we could detect the locations of these planes based on the microstructural features examined in SEM and TEM. This strengthens the concept of the physicochemical approach that relates microstructural evolution with the diffusion rates of components and imparts finer understanding of the growth mechanism of phases. The estimated diffusion coefficients at the Kirkendall marker planes indicates that the reason for the growth of the Kirkendall voids is the nonconsumption of excess vacancies which are generated due to unequal diffusion rate of components. Systematic experiments using different purity of Cu in this study indicates the importance of the presence of impurities on the growth of voids, which increases drastically for greather than 0.1 wt percent impurity. The growth of voids increases drastically for electroplated Cu, commercially pure Cu and Cu(0.5 at percent Ni) indicating the adverse role of both inorganic and organic impurities. Void size and number distribution analysis indicates the nucleation of new voids along with the growth of existing voids with the increase in annealing time. The newly found location of the Kirkendall marker plane in the Cu3Sn phase indicates that voids grow on both the sides of this plane which was not considered earlier for developing theoretical models.
  • We tackle the problem of deciding whether two probabilistic programs are equivalent in Probabilistic NetKAT, a formal language for specifying and reasoning about the behavior of packet-switched networks. We show that the problem is decidable for the history-free fragment of the language by developing an effective decision procedure based on stochastic matrices. The main challenge lies in reasoning about iteration, which we address by designing an encoding of the program semantics as a finite-state absorbing Markov chain, whose limiting distribution can be computed exactly. In an extended case study on a real-world data center network, we automatically verify various quantitative properties of interest, including resilience in the presence of failures, by analyzing the Markov chain semantics.
  • Axisymmetric boundary layers are studied using integral analysis of the governing equations for axial flow over a circular cylinder. The analysis includes the effect of pressure gradient and focuses on the effect of transverse curvature on boundary layer parameters such as shape factor ($H$) and skin-friction coefficient ($C_f$), defined as $H = \delta^*/\theta$ and $C_f = \tau_w/(0.5\rho U_e^2)$ respectively, where $\delta^*$ is displacement thickness, $\theta$ is momentum thickness, $\tau_w$ is the shear stress at the wall, $\rho$ is density and $U_e$ is the streamwise velocity at the edge of the boundary layer. Relations are obtained relating the mean wall-normal velocity at the edge of the boundary layer ($V_e$) and $C_f$ to the boundary layer and pressure gradient parameters. The analytical relations reduce to established results for planar boundary layers in the limit of infinite radius of curvature. The relations are used to obtain $C_f$ which shows good agreement with the data reported in the literature. The analytical results are used to discuss different flow regimes of axisymmetric boundary layers in the presence of pressure gradients.
  • The fragmentation dynamics of predissociative SO2(C1B2) is investigated on an accurate adiabatic potential energy surface (PES) determined from high level ab initio data. This singlet PES features non-C2v equilibrium geometries for SO2, which are separated from the SO + O dissociation limit by a barrier resulting from a conical intersection with a repulsive singlet state. The ro-vibrational state distribution of the SO fragment is determined quantum mechanically for many predissociative states of several sulfur isotopomers of SO2. Significant rotational and vibrational excitations are found in the SO fragment. It is shown that these fragment internal state distributions are strongly dependent on the predissociative vibronic states, and the excitation typically increases with the photon energy.
  • We investigated the scaling and topology of engineered urban drainage networks (UDNs) in two cities, and further examined UDN evolution over decades. UDN scaling was analyzed using two power-law characteristics widely employed for river networks: (1) Hack's law of length ($L$)-area ($A$) scaling [$L \propto A^{h}$], and (2) exceedance probability distribution of upstream contributing area $(\delta)$ [$P(A\geq \delta) \sim a \delta^{-\epsilon}$]. For the smallest UDNs ($<2 \>\text{km}^2$), length-area scales linearly ($h\sim 1$), but power-law scaling emerges as the UDNs grow. While $P(A\geq \delta)$ plots for river networks are abruptly truncated, those for UDNs display exponential tempering [$P(A\geq \delta) \>\text{=}\> a \delta^{-\epsilon}\exp(-c\delta)$]. The tempering parameter $c$ decreases as the UDNs grow, implying that the distribution evolves in time to resemble those for river networks. However, the power-law exponent $\epsilon$ for large UDNs tends to be slightly larger than the range reported for river networks. Differences in generative processes and engineering design constraints contribute to observed differences in the evolution of UDNs and river networks, including subnet heterogeneity and non-random branching.
  • Wide-area network traffic engineering enables network operators to reduce congestion and improve utilization by balancing load across multiple paths. Current approaches to traffic engineering can be modeled in terms of a routing component that computes forwarding paths, and a load balancing component that maps incoming flows onto those paths dynamically, adjusting sending rates to fit current conditions. Unfortunately, existing systems rely on simple strategies for one or both of these components, which leads to poor performance or requires making frequent updates to forwarding paths, significantly increasing management complexity. This paper explores a different approach based on semi-oblivious routing, a natural extension of oblivious routing in which the system computes a diverse set of paths independent of demands, but also dynamically adapts sending rates as conditions change. Semi-oblivious routing has a number of important advantages over competing approaches including low overhead, nearly optimal performance, and built-in protection against unexpected bursts of traffic and failures. Through in-depth simulations and a deployment on SDN hardware, we show that these benefits are robust, and hold across a wide range of topologies, demands, resource budgets, and failure scenarios.
  • This is the final report on reproducibility@xsede, a one-day workshop held in conjunction with XSEDE14, the annual conference of the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE). The workshop's discussion-oriented agenda focused on reproducibility in large-scale computational research. Two important themes capture the spirit of the workshop submissions and discussions: (1) organizational stakeholders, especially supercomputer centers, are in a unique position to promote, enable, and support reproducible research; and (2) individual researchers should conduct each experiment as though someone will replicate that experiment. Participants documented numerous issues, questions, technologies, practices, and potentially promising initiatives emerging from the discussion, but also highlighted four areas of particular interest to XSEDE: (1) documentation and training that promotes reproducible research; (2) system-level tools that provide build- and run-time information at the level of the individual job; (3) the need to model best practices in research collaborations involving XSEDE staff; and (4) continued work on gateways and related technologies. In addition, an intriguing question emerged from the day's interactions: would there be value in establishing an annual award for excellence in reproducible research?
  • India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) is a multi-institutional facility, planned to be built up in South India. The INO facility will host a 51 kton magnetized Iron CALorimeter (ICAL) detector to study atmospheric muon neutrinos. Iron plates have been chosen as the target material whereas Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) have been chosen as the active detector element for the ICAL experiment. Due to the large number of RPCs needed ($\sim$ 28,000 of $2~m \times 2~m$ in size) for ICAL experiment and for the long lifetime of the experiment, it is necessary to perform a detailed $R\&D$ such that each and every parameter of the detector performance can be optimized to improve the physics output. In this paper, we report on the detailed material and electrical properties studies for various types of glass electrodes available locally. We also report on the performance studies carried out on the RPCs made with these electrodes as well as the effect of gas composition and environmental temperature on the detector performance. We also lay emphasis on the usage of materials for RPC electrodes and the suitable enviormental conditions applicable for operating the RPC detector for optimal physics output at INO-ICAL experiment.
  • India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) is a planned neutrino experiment to be build up in southern part of India.The INO observatory will host a 51 kton Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) detector to detect atmospheric neutrinos. Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) has been chosen as the active detector element for the ICAL experiment. The ICAL experiment will consist of about 28,000 RPC's of dimension $2~m\times 2~m$, divided into three modules. The experiment is planned to take data at least for 20 years from its start date. Due to the large number of RPC needed for ICAL experiment and the long lifetime of the experiment, it is necessary to carry out detailed $R\&D$ to optimise each and every parameter of the detector performance. We report on the performance studies carried out on the RPC's made with these electrodes, and finally compare the detector performance with that of the material properties to optimise the detector parameters.
  • The Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) are going to be used as the active detectors in the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO)-Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) experiment for the detection and study of atmospheric neutrinos. In this paper, an extensive study of structural and electrical properties for different kind of bakelite RPC electrodes is presented. RPCs fabricated from these electrodes are tested for their detector efficiency and noise rate. The study concludes with the variation of efficiency, leakage current and counting rate over the period of operation with different gas compositions and operational conditions like temperature and relative humidity.
  • Here we study the structural and magnetic properties of the CoFeSr2YCu2O7 compound with x = 0.0 to 1.0. X-ray diffraction patterns and simulated data obtained from Rietveld refinement of the same indicate that the iron ion replacement in CoFeSr2YCu2O7 induces a change in crystal structure. The orthorhombic Ima2 space group structure of Co-1212 changes to tetragonal P4/mmm with increasing Fe ion. The XPS studies reveal that both Co and Fe ions are in mixed states for the former and in case of later.Although none of the studied as synthesized samples in CoFeSr2YCu2O7 are superconducting, the interesting structural changes in terms of their crystallisation space groups and the weak magnetism highlights the rich solid state chemistry of this class of materials.
  • Optimal control theory implementations for an efficient population transfer and creation of a maximum coherence in three-level system are considered. We demonstrate that the half-STIRAP (stimulated Raman adiabatic passage) scheme for creation of the maximum Raman coherence is the optimal solution according to the optimal control theory. We also present a comparative study of several implementations of optimal control theory applied to the complete population transfer and creation of the maximum coherence. Performance of the conjugate gradient method, the Zhu-Rabitz method and the Krotov method has been analyzed.