• The scattering of electromagnetic pulses is described using a non-singular boundary integral method to solve directly for the field components in the frequency domain, and Fourier transform is then used to obtain the complete space-time behavior. This approach is stable for wavelengths both small and large relative to characteristic length scales. Amplitudes and phases of field values can be obtained accurately on or near material boundaries. Local field enhancement effects due to multiple scattering of interest to applications in microphotonics are demonstrated.
  • We present a boundary integral formulation of electromagnetic scattering by homogeneous bodies that are characterized by linear constitutive equations in the frequency domain. By working with the Cartesian components of the electric, E and magnetic, H fields and with the scalar functions (r*E) and (r*H), the problem is cast as solving a set of scalar Helmholtz equations for the field components that are coupled by the usual electromagnetic boundary conditions at material boundaries. This facilitates a direct solution for E and H rather than working with surface currents as intermediate quantities in existing methods. Consequently, our formulation is free of the well-known numerical instability that occurs in the zero frequency or long wavelength limit in traditional surface integral solutions of Maxwell's equations and our numerical results converge uniformly to the static results in the long wavelength limit. Furthermore, we use a formulation of the scalar Helmholtz equation that is expressed as classically convergent integrals and does not require the evaluation of principal value integrals or any knowledge of the solid angle. Therefore, standard quadrature and higher order surface elements can readily be used to improve numerical precision. In addition, near and far field values can be calculated with equal precision and multiscale problems in which the scatterers possess characteristic length scales that are both large and small relative to the wavelength can be easily accommodated. From this we obtain results for the scattering and transmission of electromagnetic waves at dielectric boundaries that are valid for any ratio of the local surface curvature to the wave number. This is a generalization of the familiar Fresnel formula and Snell's law, valid at planar dielectric boundaries, for the scattering and transmission of electromagnetic waves at surfaces of arbitrary curvature.
  • A boundary integral formulation of electromagnetics that involves only the components of $\boldsymbol{E}$ and $\boldsymbol{H}$ is derived without the use of surface currents that appear in the classical PMCHWT formulation. The kernels of the boundary integral equations for $\boldsymbol{E}$ and $\boldsymbol{H}$ are non-singular so that all field quantities at the surface can be determined to high precision and also geometries with closely spaced surfaces present no numerical difficulties. Quadratic elements can readily be used to represent the surfaces so that the surface integrals can be calculated to higher numerical precision than using planar elements for the same numbers of degrees of freedom.
  • Big data can easily be contaminated by outliers or contain variables with heavy-tailed distributions, which makes many conventional methods inadequate. To address this challenge, we propose the adaptive Huber regression for robust estimation and inference. The key observation is that the robustification parameter should adapt to the sample size, dimension and moments for optimal tradeoff between bias and robustness. Our theoretical framework deals with heavy-tailed distributions with bounded $(1+\delta)$-th moment for any $\delta > 0$. We establish a sharp phase transition for robust estimation of regression parameters in both low and high dimensions: when $\delta \geq 1$, the estimator admits a sub-Gaussian-type deviation bound without sub-Gaussian assumptions on the data, while only a slower rate is available in the regime $0<\delta< 1$. Furthermore, this transition is smooth and optimal. In addition, we extend the methodology to allow both heavy-tailed predictors and observation noise. Simulation studies lend further support to the theory. In a genetic study of cancer cell lines that exhibit heavy-tailedness, the proposed methods are shown to be more robust and predictive.
  • We propose a class of dimension reduction methods for right censored survival data using a counting process representation of the failure process. Semiparametric estimating equations are constructed to estimate the dimension reduction subspace for the failure time model. The proposed method addresses two fundamental limitations of existing approaches. First, using the counting process formulation, it does not require any estimation of the censoring distribution to compensate the bias in estimating the dimension reduction subspace. Second, the nonparametric part in the estimating equations is adaptive to the structural dimension, hence the approach circumvents the curse of dimensionality. Asymptotic normality is established for the obtained estimators. We further propose a computationally efficient approach that simplifies the estimation equation formulations and requires only a singular value decomposition to estimate the dimension reduction subspace. Numerical studies suggest that our new approaches exhibit significantly improved performance for estimating the true dimension reduction subspace. We further conduct a real data analysis on a skin cutaneous melanoma dataset from The Cancer Genome Atlas. The proposed method is implemented in the R package "orthoDr".
  • In our recent works, based on the structural studies on water and interfacial water (topmost water layer at the solute/water interface), hydration free energy is derived and utilized to investigate the physical origin of hydrophobic interactions. In this study, it is extended to investigate the structural origin of hydration repulsive force. As a solute is embedded into water, it mainly affects the structure of interfacial water, which is dependent on the geometric shape of solute. Therefore, hydrophobic interactions may be related to the surface roughness of solute. According to this study, hydration repulsive force can reasonably be ascribed to the effects of surface roughness of solutes on hydrophobic interactions. Additionally, hydration repulsive force can only be expected as the size of surface roughness being less than Rc (critical radius), which is in correspondence with the initial solvation process as discussed in our recent work. Additionally, this can be demonstrated by potential of mean force (PMF) calculated using molecular dynamics simulations.
  • Based on our recent study on physical origin of hydrophobic effects, this is applied to investigate the dependence of hydrophobic interactions on the solute size. As two same hydrophobic solutes are dissolved into water, the hydration free energy is determined, and the critical radius (Rc) is calculated to be 3.2 Angstrom. With reference to the Rc, the dissolved behaviors can be divided into initial and hydrophobic solvation processes. These can be demonstrated by the molecular dynamics simulations on C60-C60 fullerenes in water, and CH4-CH4 molecules in water. In the association of C60 fullerenes in water, with decreasing the separation between C60 fullerenes, hydrophobic interactions can be divided into H1w and H2s hydrophobic processes, respectively. In addition, it can be derived that maximizing hydrogen bonding provides the driving force in the association of hydrophobic solutes in water.
  • We establish the counterpart of Hoeffding's lemma for Markov dependent random variables. Specifically, if a stationary Markov chain $\{X_i\}_{i \ge 1}$ with invariant measure $\pi$ admits an $\mathcal{L}_2(\pi)$-spectral gap $1-\lambda$, then for any bounded functions $f_i: x \mapsto [a_i,b_i]$, the sum of $f_i(X_i)$ is sub-Gaussian with variance proxy $\frac{1+\lambda}{1-\lambda} \cdot \sum_i \frac{(b_i-a_i)^2}{4}$. The counterpart of Hoeffding's inequality immediately follows. Our results assume none of reversibility, countable state space and time-homogeneity of Markov chains. They are optimal in terms of the multiplicative coefficient $(1+\lambda)/(1-\lambda)$, and cover Hoeffding's lemma and inequality for independent random variables as special cases with $\lambda = 0$. We illustrate the utility of these results by applying them to six problems in statistics and machine learning. They are linear regression, lasso regression, sparse covariance matrix estimation with Markov-dependent samples; Markov chain Monte Carlo estimation; respondence driven sampling; and multi-armed bandit problems with Markovian rewards.
  • Big data is transforming our world, revolutionizing operations and analytics everywhere, from financial engineering to biomedical sciences. The complexity of big data often makes dimension reduction techniques necessary before conducting statistical inference. Principal component analysis, commonly referred to as PCA, has become an essential tool for multivariate data analysis and unsupervised dimension reduction, the goal of which is to find a lower dimensional subspace that captures most of the variation in the dataset. This article provides an overview of methodological and theoretical developments of PCA over the last decade, with focus on its applications to big data analytics. We first review the mathematical formulation of PCA and its theoretical development from the view point of perturbation analysis. We then briefly discuss the relationship between PCA and factor analysis as well as its applications to large covariance estimation and multiple testing. PCA also finds important applications in many modern machine learning problems, and we focus on community detection, ranking, mixture model and manifold learning in this paper.
  • In this paper we give a proof of Enomoto's conjecture for graphs of sufficiently large order. Enomoto's conjecture states that, if $G$ is a graph of order $n$ with minimum degree $\delta(G)\geq \frac{n}{2}+1$, then for any pair of vertices $x$, $y$ in $G$, there is a Hamiltonian cycle $C$ of $G$ such that $d_C(x,y)=\lfloor \frac{n}{2}\rfloor$. The main tools of our proof are Regularity Lemma of Szemer\'edi and Blow-up Lemma of Koml\'os et al.
  • In this paper, the performance of uplink spectral efficiency in massive multiple input multiple output (MIMO) over spacially correlated Ricean fading channel is presented. The maximum ratio combining (MRC) receiver is employed at the base station (BS) for two different methods of channel estimation. The first method is based on pilot-assisted least minimum mean square error (LMMSE) estimation, the second one is based on line-of-sight (LOS) part. The respective analytical expressions of uplink data rate are given for these two methods. Due to the existence of pilot contamination, the uplink data rate of pilot-assisted LMMSE estimation method approaches to a finite value (we name it as asymptotic rate in the paper) when the BS antenna number is very large. However, the data rate of LOS method goes linearly with the number of BS antennas. The expression of the uplink rate of LOS method also show that for Ricean channel, the spacial correlation between the BS antennas may not only decrease the rate, but also increase the rate, which depends on the locations of the users. This conclusion explains why the spacial correlation may increase, rather than decrease the data rate of pilot-assisted LMMSE. We also discuss the power scaling law of the two methods, and the asymptotic expressions of the two methods are the same and both independent of the antenna correlation.
  • We consider the problem of learning high-dimensional Gaussian graphical models. The graphical lasso is one of the most popular methods for estimating Gaussian graphical models. However, it does not achieve the oracle rate of convergence. In this paper, we propose the graphical nonconvex optimization for optimal estimation in Gaussian graphical models, which is then approximated by a sequence of convex programs. Our proposal is computationally tractable and produces an estimator that achieves the oracle rate of convergence. The statistical error introduced by the sequential approximation using the convex programs are clearly demonstrated via a contraction property. The rate of convergence can be further improved using the notion of sparsity pattern. The proposed methodology is then extended to semiparametric graphical models. We show through numerical studies that the proposed estimator outperforms other popular methods for estimating Gaussian graphical models.
  • We propose a computational framework named iterative local adaptive majorize-minimization (I-LAMM) to simultaneously control algorithmic complexity and statistical error when fitting high dimensional models. I-LAMM is a two-stage algorithmic implementation of the local linear approximation to a family of folded concave penalized quasi-likelihood. The first stage solves a convex program with a crude precision tolerance to obtain a coarse initial estimator, which is further refined in the second stage by iteratively solving a sequence of convex programs with smaller precision tolerances. Theoretically, we establish a phase transition: the first stage has a sublinear iteration complexity, while the second stage achieves an improved linear rate of convergence. Though this framework is completely algorithmic, it provides solutions with optimal statistical performances and controlled algorithmic complexity for a large family of nonconvex optimization problems. The iteration effects on statistical errors are clearly demonstrated via a contraction property. Our theory relies on a localized version of the sparse/restricted eigenvalue condition, which allows us to analyze a large family of loss and penalty functions and provide optimality guarantees under very weak assumptions (For example, I-LAMM requires much weaker minimal signal strength than other procedures). Thorough numerical results are provided to support the obtained theory.
  • The strength of hydrogen bonding in water is stronger than that of van der waals interaction, therefore water may play an important role in the process of hydrophobic effects. When a hydrophobic solute is dissolved into water, an interface appears between the solute and water. To understand the mechanism of hydrophobic effects, it is necessary to study the structure of water and solute/water interface. In this study, based on the structural studies on water and air/water interface, the hydration free energy is derived, and utilized to investigate the physical origin of hydrophobic effects. According to the discussion on hydration free energy, with increasing solute size, it can be divided into the initial and hydrophobic solvation processes, respectively. In the initial solvation process, hydration free energy is dominated by the hydrogen bonding in interfacial water (topmost water layer at the solute/water interface). However, in the hydrophobic solvation process, the hydration free energy is related to hydrogen bondings of both bulk water and interfacial water. Additionally, various dissolved behaviors of solutes can be expected for different solvation processes. From this, hydrophobic effects can be ascribed to the competition between the hydrogen bondings in bulk water and those in interfacial water.
  • For complexity of the heterogeneous minimum spanning forest problem has not been determined, we reduce 3-SAT which is NP-complete to 2-heterogeneous minimum spanning forest problem to prove this problem is NP-hard and spread result to general problem, which determines complexity of this problem. It provides a theoretical basis for the future designing of approximation algorithms for the problem.
  • The finite element analysis of high frequency vibrations of quartz crystal plates is a necessary process required in the design of quartz crystal resonators of precision types for applications in filters and sensors. The anisotropic materials and extremely high frequency in radiofrequency range of resonators determine that vibration frequency spectra are complicated with strong couplings of large number of different vibration modes representing deformations which do not appear in usual structural problems. For instance, the higher-order thickness-shear vibrations usually representing the sharp deformation of thin plates in the thickness direction, expecting the analysis is to be done with refined meshing schemes along the relatively small thickness and consequently the large plane area. To be able to represent the precise vibration mode shapes, a very large number of elements are needed in the finite element analysis with either the three-dimensional theory or the higher-order plate theory, although considerable reduction of numbers of degree-of-freedom (DOF) are expected for the two-dimensional analysis without scarifying the accuracy. In this paper, we reviewed the software architecture for the analysis and demonstrated the evaluation and tuning of parameters for the improvement of the analysis with problems of elements with a large number of DOF in each node, or a problem with unusually large bandwidth of the banded stiffness and mass matrices in comparison with conventional finite element formulation. Such a problem can be used as an example for the optimization and tuning of problems from multi-physics analysis which are increasingly important in applications with excessive large number of DOF and bandwidth in engineering.
  • As an extension of the Four-Color Theorem it is conjectured that every planar graph of odd-girth at least $2k+1$ admits a homomorphism to $PC_{2k}=(\mathbb{Z}_2^{2k}, \{e_1, e_2, ...,e_{2k}, J\})$ where $e_i$'s are standard basis and $J$ is all 1 vector. Noting that $PC_{2k}$ itself is of odd-girth $2k+1$, in this work we show that if the conjecture is true, then $PC_{2k}$ is an optimal such a graph both with respect to number of vertices and number of edges. The result is obtained using the notion of walk-power of graphs and their clique numbers. An analogous result is proved for bipartite signed planar graphs of unbalanced-girth $2k$. The work is presented on a uniform frame work of planar consistent signed graphs.
  • First principles calculations based on density functional theory reveal some unusual properties of BN sheet functionalized with hydrogen and fluorine. These properties differ from those of similarly functionalized graphene even though both share the same honeycomb structure. (1) Unlike graphene which undergoes a metal to insulator transition when fully hydrogenated, the band gap of the BN sheet significantly narrows when fully saturated with hydrogen. Furthermore, the band gap of the BN sheet can be tuned from 4.7 eV to 0.6 eV and the system can be a direct or an indirect semiconductor or even a half-metal depending upon surface coverage. (2) Unlike graphene, BN sheet has hetero-atomic composition, when co-decorated with H and F, it can lead to anisotropic structures with rich electronic and magnetic properties. (3) Unlike graphene, BN sheets can be made ferromagnetic, antiferromagnetic, or magnetically degenerate depending upon how the surface is functionalized. (4) The stability of magnetic coupling of functionalized BN sheet can be further modulated by applying external strain. Our study highlights the potential of functionalized BN sheets for novel applications.
  • The structural, vibrational, energetic and electronic properties of hydrogen at the stoichiometric RuO2(110) termination are studied using density functional theory. The oxide surface is found to stabilize both molecular and dissociated H2. The most stable configuration in form of hydroxyl groups (monohydrides) at the undercoordinated O^br surface anions is at low temperatures accessed via a molecular state at the undercoordinated Ru^cus atoms (dihydrogen) and a second precursor in form of a water-like species (dihydride) at the O^br sites. This complex picture of the low-temperature dissociation kinetics of H2 at RuO2(110) is in agreement with existing data from high-resolution energy-loss spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption. Hydrogen adsorption at O^br sites increases the reactivity of the neighboring Ru^cus sites, which are believed to be the active sites in catalytic oxidation reactions.
  • Combining density-functional theory and thermodynamics we compute the phase diagram of surface structures of rutile RuO2 (110) in equilibrium with water vapor in the complete range of experimentally accessible gas phase conditions. Through the formation of hydroxyl or water-like groups, already lowest concentrations of hydrogen in the gas phase are sufficient to stabilize an oxygen-rich polar oxide termination even at very low oxygen pressure.