• In the genomic era, the identification of gene signatures associated with disease is of significant interest. Such signatures are often used to predict clinical outcomes in new patients and aid clinical decision-making. However, recent studies have shown that gene signatures are often not replicable. This occurrence has practical implications regarding the generalizability and clinical applicability of such signatures. To improve replicability, we introduce a novel approach to select gene signatures from multiple datasets whose effects are consistently non-zero and account for between-study heterogeneity. We build our model upon some rank-based quantities, facilitating integration over different genomic datasets. A high dimensional penalized Generalized Linear Mixed Model (pGLMM) is used to select gene signatures and address data heterogeneity. We compare our method to some commonly used strategies that select gene signatures ignoring between-study heterogeneity. We provide asymptotic results justifying the performance of our method and demonstrate its advantage in the presence of heterogeneity through thorough simulation studies. Lastly, we motivate our method through a case study subtyping pancreatic cancer patients from four gene expression studies.
  • Factor modeling is an essential tool for exploring intrinsic dependence structures among high-dimensional random variables. Much progress has been made for estimating the covariance matrix from a high-dimensional factor model. However, the blessing of dimensionality has not yet been fully embraced in the literature: much of the available data is often ignored in constructing covariance matrix estimates. If our goal is to accurately estimate a covariance matrix of a set of targeted variables, shall we employ additional data, which are beyond the variables of interest, in the estimation? In this paper, we provide sufficient conditions for an affirmative answer, and further quantify its gain in terms of Fisher information and convergence rate. In fact, even an oracle-like result (as if all the factors were known) can be achieved when a sufficiently large number of variables is used. The idea of utilizing data as much as possible brings computational challenges. A divide-and-conquer algorithm is thus proposed to alleviate the computational burden, and also shown not to sacrifice any statistical accuracy in comparison with a pooled analysis. Simulation studies further confirm our advocacy for the use of full data, and demonstrate the effectiveness of the above algorithm. Our proposal is applied to a microarray data example that shows empirical benefits of using more data.
  • Data subject to heavy-tailed errors are commonly encountered in various scientific fields, especially in the modern era with explosion of massive data. To address this problem, procedures based on quantile regression and Least Absolute Deviation (LAD) regression have been devel- oped in recent years. These methods essentially estimate the conditional median (or quantile) function. They can be very different from the conditional mean functions when distributions are asymmetric and heteroscedastic. How can we efficiently estimate the mean regression functions in ultra-high dimensional setting with existence of only the second moment? To solve this problem, we propose a penalized Huber loss with diverging parameter to reduce biases created by the traditional Huber loss. Such a penalized robust approximate quadratic (RA-quadratic) loss will be called RA-Lasso. In the ultra-high dimensional setting, where the dimensionality can grow exponentially with the sample size, our results reveal that the RA-lasso estimator produces a consistent estimator at the same rate as the optimal rate under the light-tail situation. We further study the computational convergence of RA-Lasso and show that the composite gradient descent algorithm indeed produces a solution that admits the same optimal rate after sufficient iterations. As a byproduct, we also establish the concentration inequality for estimat- ing population mean when there exists only the second moment. We compare RA-Lasso with other regularized robust estimators based on quantile regression and LAD regression. Extensive simulation studies demonstrate the satisfactory finite-sample performance of RA-Lasso.