• Using Chandra imaging spectroscopy and Very Large Array (VLA) L-band radio maps, we have identified radio sources at P_{1.4GHz} >=5x10^{23} W Hz^{-1} and X-ray point sources (XPSs) at L_{0.3-8keV}>=5x10^{42} erg s^{-1} in L>L* galaxies in 12 high-redshift (0.4<z<1.2) clusters of galaxies. The radio galaxies and XPSs in this cluster sample, chosen to be consistent with Coma Cluster progenitors at these redshifts, are compared to those found at low-z analyzed in Hart et al. (2009). Within a projected radius of 1 Mpc of the cluster cores, we find 17 cluster radio galaxies (11 with secure redshifts, including one luminous FR II radio source at z=0.826, and 6 more with host galaxy colors similar to cluster ellipticals). The radio luminosity function (RLF) of the cluster radio galaxies as a fraction of the cluster red sequence (CRS) galaxies reveals significant evolution of this population from high-z to low-z, with higher power radio galaxies situated in lower temperature clusters at earlier epochs. Additionally, there is some evidence that cluster radio galaxies become more centrally concentrated than CRS galaxies with cosmic time. Within this same projected radius, we identify 7 spectroscopically-confirmed cluster XPSs, all with CRS host galaxy colors. Consistent with the results from Martini et al. (2009), we estimate a minimum X-ray active fraction of 1.4+/-0.8% for CRS galaxies in high-z clusters, corresponding to an approximate 10-fold increase from 0.15+/-0.15% at low-z. Although complete redshift information is lacking for several XPSs in z>0.4 cluster fields, the increased numbers and luminosities of the CRS radio galaxies and XPSs suggest a substantial (9-10 fold) increase in the heat injected into high redshift clusters by AGN compared to the present epoch.
  • In our ongoing multi-wavelength study of cluster AGN, we find ~75% of the spectroscopically identified cluster X-ray point sources (XPS) with L(0.3-8.0keV)>10^{42} erg s^{-1} and cluster radio galaxies with P(1.4 GHz) > 3x10^{23} W Hz^{-1} in 11 moderate redshift clusters (0.2<z<0.4) are located within 500 kpc from the cluster center. In addition, these sources are much more centrally concentrated than luminous cluster red sequence (CRS) galaxies. With the exception of one luminous X-ray source, we find that cluster XPSs are hosted by passive red sequence galaxies, have X-ray colors consistent with an AGN power-law spectrum, and have little intrinsic obscuring columns in the X-ray (in agreement with previous studies). Our cluster radio sources have properties similar to FR1s, but are not detected in X-ray probably because their predicted X-ray emission falls below our sensitivity limits. Based on the observational properties of our XPS population, we suggest that the cluster XPSs are low-luminosity BL Lac objects, and thus are beamed low-power FR 1s. Extrapolating the X-ray luminosity function of BL Lacs and the Radio luminosity function of FR 1s down to fainter radio and X-ray limits, we estimate that a large fraction, perhaps all CRSs with L>L* possess relativistic jets which can inject energy into the ICM, potentially solving the uniform heating problem in the central region of clusters.
  • Using Chandra imaging spectroscopy and VLA L-band maps, we have identified radio galaxies at P(1.4 GHz) >= 3x10^{23} W Hz^{-1} and X-ray point sources (XPSs) at L(0.3-8 keV) >= 10^{42} ergs s^{-1} in 11 moderate redshift (0.2<z<0.4) clusters of galaxies. Each cluster is uniquely chosen to have a total mass similar to predicted progenitors of the present-day Coma Cluster. Within a projected radius of 1 Mpc we detect 20 radio galaxies and 8 XPSs confirmed to be cluster members above these limits. 75% of these are detected within 500 kpc of the cluster center. This result is inconsistent with a random selection from bright, red sequence ellipticals at the > 99.999% level. All but one of the XPSs are hosted by luminous ellipticals which otherwise show no other evidence for AGN activity. These objects are unlikely to be highly obscured AGN since there is no evidence for large amounts of X-ray or optical absorption. The most viable model for these sources are low luminosity BL Lac Objects. The expected numbers of lower luminosity FR 1 radio galaxies and BL Lacs in our sample converge to suggest that very deep radio and X-ray images of rich clusters will detect AGN in a large fraction of bright elliptical galaxies in the inner 500 kpc. Because both the radio galaxies and the XPSs possess relativistic jets, they can inject heat into the ICM. Using the most recent scalings of P_jet ~ L_radio^{0.5} from Birzan et al. (2008), radio sources weaker than our luminosity limit probably contribute the majority of the heat to the ICM. If a majority of ICM heating is due to large numbers of low power radio sources, triggered into activity by the increasing ICM density as they move inward, this may be the feedback mechanism necessary to stabilize cooling in cluster cores.