• QUIJOTE (Q-U-I JOint TEnerife) is an experiment designed to achieve CMB B-mode polarization detection and sensitive enough to detect a primordial gravitational-wave component if the B-mode amplitude is larger than r = 0.05. It consists in two telescopes and three instruments observing in the frequency range 10-42 GHz installed at the Teide Observatory in the Canary Islands, Spain. The observing strategy includes three raster scan deep integration fields for cosmology, a nominal wide survey covering the Northen Sky and specific raster scan deep integration observations in regions of specific interest. The main goals of the project are presented and the first scientific results obtained with the first instrument are reviewed.
  • We present observations performed with the Green Bank Telescope at 1.4 and 5 GHz of three strips coincident with the anomalous microwave emission features previously identified in the Perseus molecular cloud at 33 GHz with the Very Small Array. With these observations we determine the level of the low frequency (~1 - 5 GHz) emission. We do not detect any significant extended emission in these regions and we compute conservative 3\sigma upper limits on the fraction of free-free emission at 33 GHz of 27%, 12%, and 18% for the three strips, indicating that the level of the emission at 1.4 and 5 GHz cannot account for the emission observed at 33 GHz. Additionally, we find that the low frequency emission is not spatially correlated with the emission observed at 33 GHz. These results indicate that the emission observed in the Perseus molecular cloud at 33 GHz, is indeed in excess over the low frequency emission, hence confirming its anomalous nature.
  • We present observations of the known anomalous microwave emission region, G159.6-18.5, in the Perseus molecular cloud at 16 GHz performed with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager Small Array. These are the highest angular resolution observations of G159.6-18.5 at microwave wavelengths. By combining these microwave data with infrared observations between 5.8 and 160 \mu m from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we investigate the existence of a microwave - infrared correlation on angular scales of ~2 arcmin. We find that the overall correlation appears to increase towards shorter infrared wavelengths, which is consistent with the microwave emission being produced by electric dipole radiation from small, spinning dust grains. We also find that the microwave - infrared correlation peaks at 24 \mu m (6.7\sigma), suggesting that the microwave emission is originating from a population of stochastically heated small interstellar dust grains rather than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.
  • The Very Small Array (VSA) has been used to survey the l = 27 to 46 deg, |b|<4 deg region of the Galactic plane at a resolution of 13 arcmin. The survey consists of 44 pointings of the VSA, each with a r.m.s. sensitivity of ~90 mJy/beam. These data are combined in a mosaic to produce a map of the area. The majority of the sources within the map are HII regions. We investigated anomalous radio emission from the warm dust in 9 HII regions of the survey by making spectra extending from GHz frequencies to the FIR IRAS frequencies. Acillary radio data at 1.4, 2.7, 4.85, 8.35, 10.55, 14.35 and 94 GHz in addition to the 100, 60, 25 and 12 micron IRAS bands were used to construct the spectra. From each spectrum the free-free, thermal dust and anomalous dust emission were determined for each HII region. The mean ratio of 33 GHz anomalous flux density to FIR 100 micron flux density for the 9 selected HII regions was 1.10 +/-0.21x10^(-4). When combined with 6 HII regions previously observed with the VSA and the CBI, the anomalous emission from warm dust in HII regions is detected with a 33 GHz emissivity of 4.65 +/- 0.4 micro K/ (MJy/sr) at 11.5{\sigma}. The anomalous radio emission in HII regions is on average 41+/-10 per cent of the radio continuum at 33 GHz.
  • We present coincident observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) from the Very Small Array (VSA) and Cosmic Background Imager (CBI) telescopes. The consistency of the full datasets is tested in the map plane and the Fourier plane, prior to the usual compression of CMB data into flat bandpowers. Of the three mosaics observed by each group, two are found to be in excellent agreement. In the third mosaic, there is a 2 sigma discrepancy between the correlation of the data and the level expected from Monte Carlo simulations. This is shown to be consistent with increased phase calibration errors on VSA data during summer observations. We also consider the parameter estimation method of each group. The key difference is the use of the variance window function in place of the bandpower window function, an approximation used by the VSA group. A re-evaluation of the VSA parameter estimates, using bandpower windows, shows that the two methods yield consistent results.
  • We present direct evidence for anomalous microwave emission in the Perseus molecular cloud, which shows a clear rising spectrum from 11 to 17 GHz in the data of the COSMOSOMAS experiment. By extending the frequency coverage using WMAP maps convolved with the COSMOSOMAS scanning pattern we reveal a peak flux density of 42 (+/-) 4 Jy at 22 GHz integrated over an extended area of 1.65 x 1.0 deg centered on RA = 55.4 (+/-) 0.1 deg and Dec = 31.8 (+/-) 0.1 deg (J2000). The flux density that we measure at this frequency is nearly an order of magnitude higher than can be explained in terms of normal galactic emission processes (synchrotron, free-free and thermal dust). An extended IRAS dust feature G159.6-18.5 is found near this position and no bright unresolved source which could be an ultracompact HII region or gigahertz peaked source could be found. An adequate fit for the spectral density distribution can be achieved from 10 to 50 GHz by including a very significant contribution from electric dipole emission from small spinning dust grains.
  • We present a new puzzle involving Galactic microwave emission and attempt to resolve it. On one hand, a cross-correlation analysis of the WHAM H-alpha map with the Tenerife 10 and 15 GHz maps shows that the well-known DIRBE correlated microwave emission cannot be dominated by free-free emission. On the other hand, recent high resolution observations in the 8-10 GHz range with the Green Bank 140 ft telescope by Finkbeiner et al. failed to find the corresponding 8 sigma signal that would be expected in the simplest spinning dust models. So what physical mechanism is causing this ubiquitous dust-correlated emission? We argue for a model predicting that spinning dust is the culprit after all, but that the corresponding small grains are well correlated with the larger grains seen at 100 micron only on large angular scales. In support of this grain segregation model, we find the best spinning dust template to involve higher frequency maps in the range 12-60 micron, where emission from transiently heated small grains is important. Upcoming CMB experiments such as ground-based interferometers, MAP and Planck LFI with high resolution at low frequencies should allow a definitive test of this model.
  • We describe the first instrument of a Cosmic Microwave Background experiment for mapping cosmological structures on medium angular scales (the COSMOSOMAS experiment) and diffuse Galactic emission. The instrument is located at Teide Observatory (Tenerife) and is based on a circular scanning sky strategy. It consists of a 1 Hz spinning flat mirror directing the sky radiation into a 1.8 m off-axis paraboloidal antenna which focuses it on to a cryogenically cooled HEMT-based receiver operating in the frequency range 12--18 GHz. The signal is split by a set of three filters, allowing simultaneous observations at 13, 15 and 17 GHz, each with a 1 GHz bandpass. A 1-5 degree resolution sky map complete in RA and covering 20 degrees in declination is obtained each day at these frequencies. The observations presented here correspond to the first months of operation, which have provided a map of ~9000 square degrees on the sky centred at DEC = +31 degrees with sensitivities of 140, 150 and 250 microK per beam area in the channels at 13, 15 and 17 GHz respectively. We discuss the design and performance of the instrument, the atmospheric effects, the reliability of the data obtained and prospects of achieving a sensitivity of 30 microK per beam in two years of operation.
  • This paper presents the results from the Jodrell Bank-IAC two-element 33 GHz interferometer operated with an element separation of 32.9 wavelengths and hence sensitive to 1 deg scale structure on the sky. The level of CMB fluctuations, assuming a flat CMB spatial power spectrum over the range of multipoles l = 208 +- 18, was found using a likelihood analysis to be \Delta T_l = 63^{+7}_{-6} mu K at the 68% confidence limit, after the subtraction of the contribution of monitored point sources. Other possible foreground contributions have been assessed and are expected to have negligible impact on this result.
  • (Abridged) We present evidence that the HII regions of high luminosity in disk galaxies may be density bounded, so that a significant fraction of the ionizing photons emitted by their exciting OB stars escape from the regions. The key piece of evidence is the presence, in the H\alpha luminosity functions (LFs) of the populations of HII regions, of glitches, local sharp peaks at an apparently invariant luminosity, defined as the Stromgren luminosity (L_ Str), L_H\alpha = L_Str = 10^38.6 (\pm 10^0.1) erg/s (no other peaks are found in any of the LFs) accompanying a steepening of slope for L_H\alpha> L_Str. This behavior is readily explicable via a physical model whose basic premises are: (a) the transition at L_H\alpha = L_Str marks a change from essentially ionization bounding at low luminosities to density bounding at higher values, (b) for this to occur the law relating stellar mass in massive star-forming clouds to the mass of the placental cloud must be such that the ionizing photon flux produced within the cloud is a function which rises more steeply than the mass of the cloud. Supporting evidence for the hypothesis of this transition is presented. If confirmed, the density-bounding hypothesis would imply that the density-bounded regions were the main sources of the photons which ionize the diffuse gas in disk galaxies. We estimate that these regions emit sufficient Lyman continuum not only to ionize the diffuse medium, but to cause a typical spiral to emit significant ionizing flux into the intergalactic medium. The low scatter observed in L_Str, less than 0.1 mag rms in the still quite small sample measured to date, is an invitation to widen the data base, and to calibrate against primary standards, with the aim of obtaining a precise standard candle.
  • The recent discovery of dust-correlated diffuse microwave emission has prompted two rival explanations: free-free emission and spinning dust grains. We present new detections of this component at 10 and 15 GHz by the switched-beam Tenerife experiment. The data show a turnover in the spectrum and thereby supports the spinning dust hypothesis. We also present a significant detection of synchrotron radiation at 10 GHz, useful for normalizing foreground contamination of CMB experiments at high-galactic latitudes.
  • We describe a new high sensitivity experiment for observing cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. The instrument is a 2-element interferometer operating at 33 GHz with a ~3 GHz bandwidth. It is installed on the high and dry Teide Observatory site on Tenerife where successful beam-switching observations have been made at this frequency. Two realizations of the interferometer have been tested with element separations of 11.9 lambda and 16.7 lambda. The resulting angular resolution of ~2 deg was chosen to explore the amplitude of CMB structure on the large angular scale side of the Doppler (acoustic) peak. It is found that observations are unaffected by water vapour for more than 70 per cent of the time when the sensitivity is limited by the receiver noise alone. Observations over several months are expected to give an rms noise level of ~10 - 20 micro K covering ~100 resolution elements. Preliminary results show stable operation of the interferometer with the detection of discrete radio sources as well as the Galactic plane at Dec = +41 deg and -29 deg.
  • We have compared the Tenerife data with the {\it COBE} DMR two-year data in the declination +40\deg region of the sky observed by the Tenerife experiment. Using the Galactic plane signal at $\sim 30$ GHz, we show that the two data sets are cross-calibrated to within 5%. The high Galactic latitude data were investigated for the presence of common structures with the properties of cosmic microwave background (CMB) fluctuations. The most prominent feature in the Tenerife data ($\Delta T \sim 80\mu$K) is evident in both the 53 and 90 GHz DMR maps and has the Planckian spectrum expected for CMB anisotropy. The cross-correlation function of the Tenerife and DMR scans is indicative of common structure and at zero lag has the value $C(0)^{1/2}=34^{+13}_{-15}\: \mu$K. The combination of the spatial and spectral information from the two data sets is consistent with the presence of cosmic microwave background anisotropies common to both. The probability that noise could produce the observed agreement is less than 5%.