• The reionization of the Universe is one of the most important topics of present day astrophysical research. The most plausible candidates for the reionization process are star-forming galaxies, which according to the predictions of the majority of the theoretical and semi-analytical models should dominate the HI ionizing background at z~3. We aim at measuring the Lyman continuum escape fraction, which is one of the key parameters to compute the contribution of star-forming galaxies to the UV background. We have used ultra-deep U-band imaging (U=30.2mag at 1sigma) by LBC/LBT in the CANDELS/GOODS-North field, as well as deep imaging in COSMOS and EGS fields, in order to estimate the Lyman continuum escape fraction of 69 star-forming galaxies with secure spectroscopic redshifts at 3.27<z<3.40 to faint magnitude limits (L=0.2L*, or equivalently M1500~-19). We have measured through stacks a stringent upper limit (<1.7% at 1sigma) for the relative escape fraction of HI ionizing photons from bright galaxies (L>L*), while for the faint population (L=0.2L*) the limit to the escape fraction is ~10%. We have computed the contribution of star-forming galaxies to the observed UV background at z~3 and we have found that it is not enough to keep the Universe ionized at these redshifts, unless their escape fraction increases significantly (>10%) at low luminosities (M1500>-19). We compare our results on the Lyman continuum escape fraction of high-z galaxies with recent estimates in the literature and discuss future prospects to shed light on the end of the Dark Ages. In the future, strong gravitational lensing will be fundamental to measure the Lyman continuum escape fraction down to faint magnitudes (M1500~-16) which are inaccessible with the present instrumentation on blank fields.
  • We present $\simeq$0$.\!\!^{\prime\prime}4$-resolution extinction-independent distributions of star formation and dust in 11 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at $z = 1.3-3.0$. These galaxies are selected from sensitive, blank-field surveys of the $2' \times 2'$ Hubble Ultra-Deep Field at $\lambda = 5$ cm and 1.3 mm using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). They have star-formation rates (SFRs), stellar masses, and dust properties representative of massive main-sequence SFGs at $z \sim 2$. Morphological classification performed on spatially-resolved stellar mass maps indicates a mixture of disk and morphologically disturbed systems; half of the sample harbor X-ray active galactic nuclei (AGN), thereby representing a diversity of $z \sim 2$ SFGs undergoing vigorous mass assembly. We find that their intense star formation most frequently occurs at the location of stellar-mass concentration and extends over an area comparable to their stellar-mass distribution, with a median diameter of $4.2 \pm 1.8$ kpc. This provides direct evidence for galaxy-wide star formation in distant, blank-field-selected main-sequence SFGs. The typical galactic-average SFR surface density is 2.5 M$_{\odot}$yr$^{-1}$kpc$^{-2}$, sufficiently high to drive outflows. In X-ray-selected AGN where radio emission is enhanced over the level associated with star formation, the radio excess pinpoints the AGN, which are found to be co-spatial with star formation. The median extinction-independent size of main-sequence SFGs is two times larger than those of bright submillimeter galaxies whose SFRs are $3-8$ times larger, providing a constraint on the characteristic SFR ($\sim300$ M$_{\odot}$yr$^{-1}$) above which a significant population of more compact star-forming galaxies appears to emerge.
  • The most frequently proposed model for the origin of quasars holds that the high accretion rates seen in luminous active galactic nuclei are primarily triggered during major mergers between gas-rich galaxies. While plausible for decades, this model has only begun to be tested with statistical rigor in the past few years. Here we report on a Hubble Space Telescope study to test this hypothesis for $z=2$ quasars with high super-massive black hole masses ($M_\mathrm{BH}=10^9-10^{10}~M_\odot{}$), which dominate cosmic black hole growth at this redshift. We compare Wide Field Camera 3 $F160W$ (rest-frame $V$-band) imaging of 19 point source-subtracted quasar hosts to a matched sample of 84 inactive galaxies, testing whether the quasar hosts have greater evidence for strong gravitational interactions. Using an expert ranking procedure, we find that the quasar hosts are uniformly distributed within the merger sequence of inactive galaxies, with no preference for quasars in high-distortion hosts. Using a merger/non-merger cutoff approach, we recover distortion fractions of $f_\mathrm{m,qso}=0.39\pm{}0.11$ for quasar hosts and $f_\mathrm{m,gal}=0.30\pm{}0.05$ for inactive galaxies (distribution modes, 68% confidence intervals), with both measurements subjected to the same observational conditions and limitations. The slight enhancement in distorted fraction for quasar hosts over inactive galaxies is not significant, with a probability that the quasar fraction is higher of $P(f_\mathrm{m,qso}>f_\mathrm{m,gal}) = 0.78$ ($0.78\,\sigma{}$), in line with results for lower mass and lower $z$ AGN. We find no evidence that major mergers are the primary triggering mechanism for the massive quasars that dominate accretion at the peak of cosmic quasar activity.
  • We study of the role of major mergers (mass ratios >1:4) in driving size growth in high-redshift (1<z<2) spheroidal galaxies (SGs) with stellar masses between 10^9.5 MSun and 10^10.7 MSun. This is a largely unexplored mass range at this epoch, containing the progenitors of more massive SGs on which the bulk of the size-evolution literature is based. We visually split our SGs into systems that are relaxed and those that exhibit tidal features indicative of a recent merger. Numerical simulations indicate that, given the depth of our images, only tidal features due to major mergers will be detectable at these epochs (features from minor mergers being too faint), making the disturbed SGs a useful route for estimating major-merger-driven size growth. The disturbed SGs are offset in size from their relaxed counterparts, lying close to the upper envelope of the local size -- mass relation. The mean size ratio of the disturbed SGs to their relaxed counterparts is ~2. Combining this observed size growth with empirical major-merger histories from the literature suggests that the size evolution of a significant fraction (around two-thirds) of SGs in this mass range could be driven by major mergers. If, as is likely, our galaxies are progenitors of more massive M > 10^10.7 MSun SGs at z<1, then major mergers are also likely to play an important role in the size growth of at least some massive SGs in this mass range.
  • The Unified Model of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) has provided a successful explanation for the observed diversity of AGN in the local Universe. However, recent analysis of multi-wavelength spectral and image data suggests that the Unified Model is only a partial theory of AGN, and may need to be augmented to remain consistent with all observations. Recent studies using high spatial resolution ground- and space-based observations of local AGN show that Seyfert class and the "core" (r<~1 kpc) host-galaxy morphology are correlated. Currently, this relationship has only been established qualitatively, by visual inspection of the core morphologies of low redshift (z<0.035) Seyfert host galaxies (Malkan et al. 1998). We re-establish this empirical relationship in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) optical imaging by visual inspection of a catalog of 85 local (D<63 Mpc) Seyfert galaxies. We also attempt to re-establish the core morphology-Seyfert class relationship using an automated, non-parametric technique that combines both existing classification parameters methods (the adapted CAS, G-M20), and a new method which implements the Source Extractor software for feature detection in unsharp-mask images. This new method is designed explicitly to detect dust features in the images. We use our automated approach to classify the morphology of the AGN cores and determine that Sy2 galaxies visually appear, on average, to have more dust features than Sy1. With the exception of this "dustiness" however, we do not measure a strong correlation between the dust morphology and the Seyfert class of the host galaxy using quantitative techniques. We discuss the implications of these results in the context of the Unified Model.
  • We analyze the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z=1-3 selected using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) UVIS channel filters. These HST/WFC3 observations cover about 50 sq. arcmin in the GOODS-South field as a part of the WFC3 Early Release Science program. These LBGs at z=1-3 are selected using dropout selection criteria similar to high redshift LBGs. The deep multi-band photometry in this field is used to identify best-fit SED models, from which we infer the following results: (1) the photometric redshift estimate of these dropout selected LBGs is accurate to within few percent; (2) the UV spectral slope (beta) is redder than at high redshift (z>3), where LBGs are less dusty; (3) on average, LBGs at z=1-3 are massive, dustier and more highly star-forming, compared to LBGs at higher redshifts with similar luminosities (0.1L*<~L<~2.5L*), though their median values are similar within 1-sigma uncertainties. This could imply that identical dropout selection technique, at all redshifts, find physically similar galaxies; and (4) stellar masses of these LBGs are directly proportional to their UV luminosities with a logarithmic slope of ~0.46, and star-formation rates are proportional to their stellar masses with a logarithmic slope of ~0.90. These relations hold true --- within luminosities probed in this study --- for LBGs from z~1.5 to 5. The star-forming galaxies selected using other color-based techniques show similar correlations at z~2, but to avoid any selection biases, and for direct comparison with LBGs at z>3, a true Lyman break selection at z~2 is essential. The future HST UV surveys, both wider and deeper, covering a large luminosity range are important to better understand LBG properties, and their evolution.
  • We study the significance of major-merger-driven star formation in the early Universe, by quantifying the contribution of this process to the total star formation budget in 80 massive (M* > 10^10 MSun) galaxies at z~2. Employing visually-classified morphologies from rest-frame V-band HST imaging, we find that 55+/-14% of the star formation budget is hosted by non-interacting late-types, with 27+/-8% in major mergers and 18+/-6% in spheroids. Given that a system undergoing a major merger continues to experience star formation driven by other processes at this epoch (e.g. cold accretion, minor mergers), ~27% is an upper limit to the major-merger contribution to star formation activity at this epoch. The ratio of the average specific star formation rate in major mergers to that in the non-interacting late-types is ~2.2:1, suggesting that the enhancement of star formation due to major merging is typically modest, and that just under half the star formation in systems experiencing major mergers is unrelated to the merger itself. Taking this into account, we estimate that the actual major-merger contribution to the star formation budget may be as low as ~15%. While our study does not preclude a major-merger-dominated era in the very early Universe, if the major-merger contribution to star formation does not evolve strongly into larger look-back times, then this process has a relatively insignificant role in driving stellar mass assembly over cosmic time.
  • We study ~330 massive (M* > 10^9.5 MSun), newborn spheroidal galaxies (SGs) around the epoch of peak star formation (1<z<3), to explore the high-redshift origin of SGs and gain insight into when and how the old stellar populations that dominate today's Universe formed. The sample is drawn from the HST/WFC3 Early-Release Science programme, which provides deep 10-filter (0.2 - 1.7 micron) HST imaging over a third of the GOODS-South field. We find that the star formation episodes that built the SGs likely peaked in the redshift range 2<z<5 (with a median of z~3) and have decay timescales shorter than ~1.5 Gyr. Starburst timescales and ages show no trend with stellar mass in the range 10^9.5 < M* < 10^10.5 MSun. However, the timescales show increased scatter towards lower values (<0.3 Gyr) for M* > 10^10.5 MSun, and an age trend becomes evident in this mass regime: SGs with M* > 10^11.5 MSun are ~2 Gyrs older than their counterparts with M* < 10^10.5 MSun. Nevertheless, a smooth downsizing trend with galaxy mass is not observed, and the large scatter in starburst ages indicate that SGs are not a particularly coeval population. Around half of the blue SGs appear not to drive their star formation via major mergers, and those that have experienced a recent major merger, show only modest enhancements (~40%) in their specific star formation rates. Our empirical study indicates that processes other than major mergers (e.g. violent disk instability driven by cold streams and/or minor mergers) likely play a dominant role in building SGs, and creating a significant fraction of the old stellar populations that dominate today's Universe.
  • In the first of a series of forthcoming publications, we present a panchromatic catalog of 102 visually-selected early-type galaxies (ETGs) from observations in the Early Release Science (ERS) program with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South (GOODS-S) field. Our ETGs span a large redshift range, 0.35 < z < 1.5, with each redshift spectroscopically-confirmed by previous published surveys of the ERS field. We combine our measured WFC3 ERS and ACS GOODS-S photometry to gain continuous sensitivity from the rest-frame far-UV to near-IR emission for each ETG. The superior spatial resolution of the HST over this panchromatic baseline allows us to classify the ETGs by their small-scale internal structures, as well as their local environment. By fitting stellar population spectral templates to the broad-band photometry of the ETGs, we determine that the average masses of the ETGs are comparable to the characteristic stellar mass of massive galaxies, 11< log(M [Solar]) < 12. By transforming the observed photometry into the GALEX FUV and NUV, Johnson V, and SDSS g' and r' bandpasses we identify a noteworthy diversity in the rest-frame UV-optical colors and find the mean rest-frame (FUV-V)=3.5 and (NUV-V)=3.3, with 1$\sigma$ standard deviations approximately equal to 1.0. The blue rest-frame UV-optical colors observed for most of the ETGs are evidence for star-formation during the preceding gigayear, but no systems exhibit UV-optical photometry consistent with major recent (<~50 Myr) starbursts. Future publications which address the diversity of stellar populations likely to be present in these ETGs, and the potential mechanisms by which recent star-formation episodes are activated, are discussed.
  • We present a sample of 17 newly discovered ultracool dwarf candidates later than ~M8, drawn from 231.90 arcmin2 of {\it Hubble Space Telescope} Wide Field Camera 3 infrared imaging. By comparing the observed number counts for 17.5<J_125<25.5 AB mag to an exponential disk model, we estimate a vertical scale height of z_scl=290 +- 25 (random) +- 30 (systematic) pc for a binarity fraction of f_b=0. While our estimate is roughly consistent with published results, we suggest that the differences can be attributed to sample properties, with the present sample containing far more substellar objects than previous work. We predict the object counts should peak at J_{125}~24 AB mag due to the exponentially-declining number density at the edge of the disc. We conclude by arguing that trend in scale height with spectral type may breakdown for brown dwarfs since they do not settle onto the main sequence.
  • We present grism spectra of emission-line galaxies (ELGs) from 0.6-1.6 microns from the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope. These new infrared grism data augment previous optical Advanced Camera for Surveys G800L 0.6-0.95 micron grism data in GOODS-South from the PEARS program, extending the wavelength covereage well past the G800L red cutoff. The ERS grism field was observed at a depth of 2 orbits per grism, yielding spectra of hundreds of faint objects, a subset of which are presented here. ELGs are studied via the Ha, [OIII], and [OII] emission lines detected in the redshift ranges 0.2<z<1.4, 1.2<z<2.2 and 2.0<z<3.3 respectively in the G102 (0.8-1.1 microns; R~210) and G141 (1.1-1.6 microns; R~130) grisms. The higher spectral resolution afforded by the WFC3 grisms also reveals emission lines not detectable with the G800L grism (e.g., [SII] and [SIII] lines). From these relatively shallow observations, line luminosities, star-formation rates, and grism spectroscopic redshifts are determined for a total of 48 ELGs to m(AB)~25 mag. Seventeen GOODS-South galaxies that previously only had photometric redshifts now have new grism-spectroscopic redshifts, in some cases with large corrections to the photometric redshifts (Delta(z)~0.3-0.5). Additionally, one galaxy had no previously-measured redshift but now has a secure grism-spectroscopic redshift, for a total of 18 new GOODS-South spectroscopic redshifts. The faintest source in our sample has a magnitude m(AB)=26.9 mag. The ERS grism data also reflect the expected trend of lower specific star formation rates for the highest mass galaxies in the sample as a function of redshift, consistent with downsizing and discovered previously from large surveys. These results demonstrate the remarkable efficiency and capability of the WFC3 NIR grisms for measuring galaxy properties to faint magnitudes and redshifts to z>2.
  • We combine new high sensitivity ultraviolet (UV) imaging from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) with existing deep HST/Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) optical images from the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) program to identify UV-dropouts, which are Lyman break galaxy (LBG) candidates at z~1-3. These new HST/WFC3 observations were taken over 50 sq.arcmin in the GOODS-South field as a part of the Early Release Science program. The uniqueness of these new UV data is that they are observed in 3 UV/optical (WFC3 UVIS) channel filters (F225W, F275W and F336W), which allows us to identify three different sets of UV-dropout samples. We apply Lyman break dropout selection criteria to identify F225W-, F275W- and F336W-dropouts, which are z~1.7, 2.1 and 2.7 LBG candidates, respectively. Our results are as follows: (1) these WFC3 UVIS filters are very reliable in selecting LBGs with z~2.0, which helps to reduce the gap between the well studied z~>3 and z~0 regimes, (2) the combined number counts agrees very well with the observed change in the surface densities as a function of redshift when compared with the higher redshift LBG samples; and (3) the best-fit Schechter function parameters from the rest-frame UV luminosity functions at three different redshifts fit very well with the evolutionary trend of the characteristic absolute magnitude, and the faint-end slope, as a function of redshift. This is the first study to illustrate the usefulness of the WFC3 UVIS channel observations to select z<3 LBGs. The addition of the new WFC3 on the HST has made it possible to uniformly select LBGs from z~1 to z~9, and significantly enhance our understanding of these galaxies using HST sensitivity and resolution.
  • We present results on the size evolution of passively evolving galaxies at 1<z<2 drawn from the Wide Field Camera 3 Early Release Science program. Our sample was constructed using an analog to the passive BzK selection criterion, which isolates galaxies with little or no on-going star formation at z>1.5. We identify 30 galaxies in ~40 square arcmin to H<25 mag. We supplement spectroscopic redshifts from the literature with photometric redshifts determined from the 15-band photometry from 0.22-8 micron. We determine effective radii from Sersic profile fits to the H-band image using an empirical PSF. We find that size evolution is a strong function of stellar mass, with the most massive (M* ~ 10^11 Msol) galaxies undergoing the most rapid evolution from z~2 to the present. Parameterizing the size evolution as (1+z)^{-alpha}, we find a tentative scaling between alpha and stellar mass of alpha ~ -1.8+1.4 log(M*/10^9 Msol). We briefly discuss the implications of this result for our understanding of the dynamical evolution of the red galaxies.
  • We present the results of a study of the late-type spiral galaxy NGC 0959, before and after application of the pixel-based dust extinction correction described in Tamura et al. 2009 (Paper I). Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV), ground-based Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope (VATT) UBVR, and Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 micron images are studied through pixel Color-Magnitude Diagrams (pCMDs) and pixel Color-Color Diagrams (pCCDs). We define groups of pixels based on their distribution in a pCCD of (B - 3.6 micron) versus (FUV - U) colors after extinction correction. In the same pCCD, we trace their locations before the extinction correction was applied. This shows that selecting pixel groups is not meaningful when using colors uncorrected for dust. We also trace the distribution of the pixel groups on a pixel coordinate map of the galaxy. We find that the pixel-based (two-dimensional) extinction correction is crucial to reveal the spatial variations in the dominant stellar population, averaged over each resolution element. Different types and mixtures of stellar populations, and galaxy structures such as a previously unrecognized bar, become readily discernible in the extinction-corrected pCCD and as coherent spatial structures in the pixel coordinate map.
  • Deep ACS slitless grism observations and identification of stellar sources are presented within the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) North and South fields which were obtained in the Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically (PEARS) program. It is demonstrated that even low resolution spectra can be a very powerful means to identify stars in the field, especially low mass stars with stellar types M0 and later. The PEARS fields lay within the larger GOODS fields, and we used new, deeper images to further refine the selection of stars in the PEARS field, down to a magnitude of mz = 25 using a newly developed stellarity parameter. The total number of stars with reliable spectroscopic and morphological identification was 95 and 108 in the north and south fields respectively. The sample of spectroscopically identified stars allows constraints to be set on the thickness of the Galactic thin disk as well as contributions from a thick disk and a halo component. We derive a thin disk scale height, as traced by the population of M4 to M9 dwarfs along two independent lines of sight, of h_thin = 370 +60/-65 pc. When including the more massive M0 to M4 dwarf population, we derive h_thin = 300 +/- 70pc. In both cases, we observe that we must include a combination of thick and halo components in our models in order to account for the observed numbers of faint dwarfs. The required thick disk scale height is typically h_thick=1000 pc and the acceptable relative stellar densities of the thin disk to thick disk and the thin disk to halo components are in the range of 0.00025<f_halo<0.0005 and 0.05<f_thick<0.08 and are somewhat dependent on whether the more massive M0 to M4 dwarfs are included in our sample.
  • We combine the exceptional depth of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) images and the deep GRism ACS Program for Extragalactic Science (GRAPES) grism spectroscopy to explore the stellar populations of 34 bulges belonging to late-type galaxies at z=0.8-1.3. The sample is selected based on the presence of a noticeable 4000A break in their GRAPES spectra, and by visual inspection of the HUDF images. The HUDF images are used to measure bulge color and Sersic index. The narrow extraction of the GRAPES data around the galaxy center enables us to study the spectrum of the bulges in these late-type galaxies, minimizing the contamination from the disk of the galaxy. We use the low resolution (R~50) spectral energy distribution (SED) around the 4000A break to estimate redshifts and stellar ages. The SEDs are compared with models of galactic chemical evolution to determine the stellar mass, and to characterize the age distribution. We find that, (1) the average age of late-type bulges in our sample is ~1.3 Gyr with stellar masses in the range log(M)=6.5-10 solar. (2) Late-type bulges are younger than early-type galaxies at similar redshifts and lack a trend of age with respect to redshift, suggesting a more extended period of star formation. (3) Bulges and inner disks in these late-type galaxies show similar stellar populations, and (4) late-type bulges are better fitted by exponential surface brightness profiles. The overall picture emerging from the GRAPES data is that, in late-type galaxies at z=1, bulges form through secular evolution and disks via an inside-out process.
  • We present evidence that the optically unidentified radio source, FIRST J121839.7+295325, may be strongly lensing a background galaxy. We estimate the redshift of the assumed gravitational arc, discovered in parallel imaging with HST, from MMT-Blue Channel spectroscopy to be z_{arc}=2.48_-0.05^+0.14. We present lens models with an Einstein radius of R_E=1.3" which contains a mass of M_{dyn}=10^{12 +- 0.5} M_{sol}, where the uncertainty reflects the range of possible lens redshifts. The putative lens is not detected to J_{lim}=22.0 mag and H_{lim}=20.7 mag in our MMT-SWIRC imaging. Using the flux limits from WFPC2 and SWIRC, we estimate that the dynamical mass-to-light ratio of J121839.7+295325 is M_{dyn}/L_B >~ 10 M_sol/L_sol for A_V=1 mag, and this lower limit could be as high as 30 M_sol/L_sol for A_V=0 mag. Since the radio source is optically unidentified (V_{lim}=25.5 mag) and has a radio flux of S_{1.4 GHz}=33 mJy, it is likely a massive early-type galaxy which hosts a radio-loud AGN at 0.8<z<1.5. However, the present data cannot uniquely determine the mass-to-light ratio of the lensing galaxy, and hence the possibility that this system may be a reasonably dark lens is not ruled out.
  • We report on a statistical study of the 51 radio galaxies at the millijansky flux level from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty centimeters, including their optical morphologies and structure obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. Our optical imaging is significantly deeper (~2 mag) than previous studies with the superior angular resolution of space-based imaging. We that find 8/51 (16%) of the radio sources have no optically identifiable counterpart to AB~24 mag. For the remaining 43 sources, only 25 are sufficiently resolved in the HST images to reliably assign a visual classification: 15 (60%) are elliptical galaxies, 2 (8%) are late-type spiral galaxies, 1 (4%) is an S0, 3 (12%) are point-like objects (quasars), and 4 (16%) are merger systems. We find a similar distribution of optical types with measurements of the Sersic index. The optical magnitude distribution of these galaxies peaks at I~20.7+-0.5 AB mag, which is ~3 mag brighter than the depth of our typical HST field and is thus not due to the WFPC2 detection limit. This supports the luminosity-dependent density evolutionary model, where the majority of faint radio galaxies typically have L*-optical luminosities and a median redshift of z~0.8 with a relatively abrupt redshift cut-off at z>~2. We discuss our results in the context of the evolution of elliptical galaxies and active galactic nuclei.
  • We present a measurement of the galaxy merger fraction and number density from observations in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field for 0.5<z<2.5. We fit the combination of broadband data and slitless spectroscopy of 1308 galaxies with stellar population synthesis models to select merging systems based on a stellar mass of >10^10 M_sol. When correcting for mass incompleteness, the major merger fraction is not simply proportional to (1+z)^m, but appears to peak at z_frac~=1.3+-0.4. From this merger fraction, we infer that ~42% of massive galaxies have undergone a major merger since z~1. We show that the major merger number density peaks at z_dens~1.2, which marks the epoch where major merging of massive galaxies is most prevalent. This critical redshift is comparable to the peak of the cosmic star formation rate density, and occurs roughly 2.6 Gyr earlier in cosmic time than the peak in the number density of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei. These observations support an indirect evolutionary link between merging, starburst, and active galaxies.
  • The Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) contains a significant number of B, V and i'-band dropout objects, many of which were recently confirmed to be young star-forming galaxies at z~4-6. These galaxies are too faint individually to accurately measure their radial surface brightness profiles. Their average light profiles are potentially of great interest, since they may contain clues to the time since the onset of significant galaxy assembly. We separately co-add V, i' and z'-band HUDF images of sets of z~4,5 and 6 objects, pre-selected to have nearly identical compact sizes and the roundest shapes. From these stacked images, we are able to study the averaged radial structure of these objects at much higher signal-to-noise ratio than possible for an individual faint object. Here we explore the reliability and usefulness of a stacking technique of compact objects at z~4-6 in the HUDF. Our results are: (1) image stacking provides reliable and reproducible average surface brightness profiles; (2) the shape of the average surface brightness profiles show that even the faintest z~4-6 objects are resolved; and (3) if late-type galaxies dominate the population of galaxies at z~4-6, as previous HST studies have shown, then limits to dynamical age estimates for these galaxies from their profile shapes are comparable with the SED ages obtained from the broadband colors. We also present accurate measurements of the sky-background in the HUDF and its associated 1-sigma uncertainties.
  • We investigate the evolution of the faint-end slope of the luminosity function, $\alpha$, using semi-analytical modeling of galaxy formation. In agreement with observations, we find that the slope can be fitted well by $\alpha (z) =a+b z$, with a=-1.13 and b=-0.1. The main driver for the evolution in $\alpha$ is the evolution in the underlying dark matter mass function. Sub-L_* galaxies reside in dark matter halos that occupy a different part of the mass function. At high redshifts, this part of the mass function is steeper than at low redshifts and hence $\alpha$ is steeper. Supernova feedback in general causes the same relative flattening with respect to the dark matter mass function. The faint-end slope at low redshifts is dominated by field galaxies and at high redshifts by cluster galaxies. The evolution of $\alpha(z)$ in each of these environments is different, with field galaxies having a slope b=-0.14 and cluster galaxies b=-0.05. The transition from cluster-dominated to field-dominated faint-end slope occurs roughly at a redshift $z_* \sim 2$, and suggests that a single linear fit to the overall evolution of $\alpha(z)$ might not be appropriate. Furthermore, this result indicates that tidal disruption of dwarf galaxies in clusters cannot play a significant role in explaining the evolution of $\alpha(z)$ at z< z_*. In addition we find that different star formation efficiencies a_* in the Schmidt-Kennicutt-law and supernovae-feedback efficiencies $\epsilon$ generally do not strongly influence the evolution of $\alpha(z)$.
  • We present a catalog of spectro-photometric redshifts for 1308 galaxies from the GRism ACS Program for Extragalactic Science (GRAPES) observations with the Hubble Space Telescope. These low-resolution spectra between 6000 A and 9500 A are supplemented with U, J, H, and Ks from various facilities, resulting in redshifts computed with ~40 spectral bins per galaxy. For 81 galaxies between 0.5<z<1.5 with spectroscopic redshifts, the standard deviation in the fractional error in (1+z) is 0.046. With this catalog, we compute the B-band luminosity function in this redshift range from 72 galaxies. Owing to the depth of the GRAPES survey, we are able to accurately constrain the faint-end slope by going to M_B~-18 mag at 0.8<z<1.2, nearly two magnitudes fainter than previous studies. The faint-end slope is alpha=-1.32+-0.07. When compared to numerous published values at various redshifts, we find strong evidence for a steepening of the faint-end slope with redshift which is expected in the hierarchical formation scenario of galaxies.
  • We present a 1.4-GHz catalog of 810 radio sources (560 sources in the complete sample) with 1.8" resolution found within a 17' radius in the SSA13 field (RA=13h12m,DEC=42d38'). The radio image from the VLA has an rms noise level of 4.82 microJy/beam at the field center, and Subaru optical images in r-band (6300A) and z-band (9200A) have a three-sigma detection magnitude of 26.1 and 24.9, respectively. 88% of the radio sources are identified with an optical counterpart, and there is significantly more reddening for objects fainter than 24-mag. The radio and optical parameters are tabulated, and source morphologies are displayed by radio contours overlaying optical false-color images. The radio structures show a wealth of complexity and these are classified into a small number of categories. About one-third of the radio sources are larger than 1.2" and their orientation is often similar to that of the associated galaxy or binary-galaxy system. The density of sources in the SSA13 field above 75 microJy is 0.40 per square arcmin, with a slope of -2.43 in the differential counts. The radio spectral index may steepen for sources below 75 microJy. We estimate that at most 40% of the microJansky radio sources are dominated by AGN processes.
  • In the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) an abundance of galaxies is seen with a knot at one end plus an extended tail, resembling a tadpole. These "tadpole galaxies" appear dynamically unrelaxed--presumably in an early merging state--where tidal interactions likely created the distorted knot-plus-tail morphology. Here we systematically select tadpole galaxies from the HUDF and study their properties as a function of their photometric redshifts. In a companion HUDF variability study, Cohen et al. (2005) revealed a total of 45 variable objects believed to be Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Here we show that this faint AGN sample has no overlap with the tadpole galaxy sample, as predicted by theoretical work. The tadpole morphology--combined with the lack of overlap with the variable objects--supports the idea that these galaxies are in the process of an early-stage merger event, i.e., at a stage that likely precedes the "turn-on" of any AGN component and the onset of any point-source variability.
  • We present grism spectra taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys to identify 29 red sources with (i'-z') > 0.9 in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF). Of these 23 are found to be galaxies at redshifts between z=5.4 and 6.7, identified by the break at 1216 angstrom due to IGM absorption; two are late type dwarf stars with red colors; and four are galaxies with colors and spectral shape similar to dust reddened or old galaxies at redshifts z~1-2. This constitutes the largest uniform, flux-limited sample of spectroscopically confirmed galaxies at such faint fluxes z'<27.5. Many are also among the most distant spectroscopically confirmed galaxies (at redshifts up to z=6.7). We find a significant overdensity of galaxies at redshifts z=5.9 +/- 0.2. Nearly two thirds of the galaxies in our sample (15/23) belong to this peak. Taking into account the selection function and the redshift sensitivity of the survey, we get a conservative overdensity of at least a factor of two along the line-of-sight. The galaxies found in this redshift peak are also localized in the plane of the sky in a non-random manner, occupying about half of the ACS chip. Thus the volume overdensity is a factor of four. The star-formation rate derived from detected sources in this overdense region is sufficient to reionize the local IGM.