• K-band spectra are presented for a sample of 39 Spitzer IRS SAGE-Spec sources in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The spectra exhibit characteristics in very good agreement with their positions in the near infrared - Spitzer color-magnitude diagrams and their properties as deduced from the Spitzer IRS spectra. Specifically, the near infrared spectra show strong atomic and molecular features representative of oxygen-rich and carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch stars, respectively. A small subset of stars were chosen from the luminous and red extreme "tip" of the color magnitude diagram. These objects have properties consistent with dusty envelopes but also cool, carbon-rich "stellar" cores. Modest amounts of dust mass loss combine with the stellar spectral energy distribution to make these objects appear extreme in their near infrared and mid infrared colors. One object in our sample, HV 915, a known post asymptotic giant branch star of the RV Tau type exhibits CO 2.3 micron band head emission consistent with previous work that demonstrates the object has a circumstellar disk.
  • Spectrophotometric distances in the K band have been reported by different authors for a number of obscured Galactic HII regions. Almost 50% of them show large discrepancies compared to the classical method using radial velocities measured in the radio spectral region. In order to provide a crucial test of both methods, we selected a target which does not present particular difficulty for any method and which has been measured by as many techniques as possible. The W3 star forming complex, located in the Perseus arm, offers a splendid opportunity for such a task. We used the NIFS spectrograph on the Frederick C. Gillett Gemini North telescope to classify candidate "naked photosphere" OB stars based on 2MASS photometry. Two of the targets are revealed to be mid O-type main sequence stars leading to a distance of d = 2.20 kpc. This is in excellent agreement with the spectrophotometric distance derived in the optical band (d = 2.18 kpc, Humphreys 1978) and with a measurement of the W3 trigonometric parallax (d = 1.95 kpc, Xu et al. 2006). Such results confirm that the spectrophotometric distances in the K band are reliable. The radio derived kinematic distance, on the contrary, gives a distance twice as large (d = 4.2 kpc, Russeil 2003). This indicates that this region of Perseus arm does not follow the Galactic rotation curve, and this may be the case also for other HII regions for which discrepancies have been found.
  • We present the classification of 197 point sources observed with the Infrared Spectrograph in the SAGE-Spec Legacy program on the Spitzer Space Telescope. We introduce a decision-tree method of object classification based on infrared spectral features, continuum and spectral energy distribution shape, bolometric luminosity, cluster membership, and variability information, which is used to classify the SAGE-Spec sample of point sources. The decision tree has a broad application to mid-infrared spectroscopic surveys, where supporting photometry and variability information are available. We use these classifications to make deductions about the stellar populations of the Large Magellanic Cloud and the success of photometric classification methods. We find 90 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, 29 young stellar objects, 23 post-AGB objects, 19 red supergiants, eight stellar photospheres, seven background galaxies, seven planetary nebulae, two HII regions and 12 other objects, seven of which remain unclassified.
  • We present a near infrared study of the stellar content of 35 H\,{\sc{ii}} regions in the Galactic plane. In this work, we have used the near infrared domain $J-$, $H-$ and $K_{s}-$ band color images to visually inspect the sample. Also, color-color and color-magnitude diagrams were used to indicate ionizing star candidates, as well as, the presence of young stellar objects such as classical TTauri Stars (CTTS) and massive young stellar objects (MYSOs). We have obtained {\it Spitzer} IRAC images for each region to help further characterize them. {\it Spitzer} and near infrared morphology to place each cluster in an evolutionary phase of development. {\it Spitzer} photometry was also used to classify the MYSOs. Comparison of the main sequence in color-magnitude diagrams to each observed cluster was used to infer whether or not the cluster kinematic distance is consistent with brightnesses of the stellar sources. We find qualitative agreement for a dozen of the regions, but about half the regions have near infrared photometry that suggests they may be closer than the kinematic distance. A significant fraction of these already have spectrophotometric parallaxes which support smaller distances. These discrepancies between kinematic and spectrophotometric distances are not due to the spectrophotometric methodologies, since independent non-kinematic measurements are in agreement with the spectrophotometric results. For instance, trigonometric parallaxes of star-forming regions were collected from the literature and show the same effect of smaller distances when compared to the kinematic results. In our sample of H\,{\sc{ii}} regions, most of the clusters are evident in the near infrared images. Finally, it is possible to distinguish among qualitative evolutionary stages for these objects.
  • The SAGE-Spec Spitzer Legacy program is a spectroscopic follow-up to the SAGE-LMC photometric survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. We present an overview of SAGE-Spec and some of its first results. The SAGE-Spec program aims to study the life cycle of gas and dust in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and to provide information essential to the classification of the point sources observed in the earlier SAGE-LMC photometric survey. We acquired 224.6 hours of observations using the InfraRed Spectrograph and the SED mode of the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer. The SAGE-Spec data, along with archival Spitzer spectroscopy of objects in the Large Magellanic Cloud, are reduced and delivered to the community. We discuss the observing strategy, the specific data reduction pipelines applied and the dissemination of data products to the scientific community. Initial science results include the first detection of an extragalactic "21 um" feature towards an evolved star and elucidation of the nature of disks around RV Tauri stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Towards some young stars, ice features are observed in absorption. We also serendipitously observed a background quasar, at a redshift of z~0.14, which appears to be host-less.
  • We present K-band spectra of newly born OB stars in the obscured Galactic giant H II region W51A and ~ 0.8'' angular resolution images in the J, H and K_S-bands. Four objects have been spectroscopically classified as O-type stars. The mean spectroscopic parallax of the four stars gives a distance of 2.0 \pm 0.3 kpc (error in the mean), significantly smaller than the radio recombination line kinematic value of 5.5 kpc or the values derived from maser propermotion observations (6--8 kpc). The number of Lyman continuum photons from the contribution of all massive stars (NLyc ~ 1.5 x 10^{50} s^{-1}) is in good agreement with that inferred from radio recombination lines (NLyc = 1.3 x 10^{50} s^{-1}) after accounting for the smaller distance derived here. We present analysis of archival high angular resolution images (NAOS CONICA at VLT and T-ReCS at Gemini) of the compact region W51 IRS2. The K_S--band images resolve the infrared source IRS~2 indicating that it is a very young compact HII region. Sources IRS2E was resolved into compact cluster (within 660 AU of projected distance) of 3 objects, but one of them is just bright extended emission. W51d1 and W51d2 were identified with compact clusters of 3 objects (maybe 4 in the case of W51d1) each one. Although IRS~2E is the brightest source in the K-band and at 12.6 \micron, it is not clearly associated with a radio continuum source. Our spectrum of IRS~2E shows, similar to previous work, strong emission in Br$\gamma$ and HeI, as well as three forbidden emission lines of FeIII and emission lines of molecular hydrogen (H_2) marking it as a massive young stellar object.
  • We present IRAC and MIPS images and photometry of a sample of previously known planetary nebulae (PNe) from the SAGE survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) performed with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Of the 233 known PNe in the survey field, 185 objects were detected in at least two of the IRAC bands, and 161 detected in the MIPS 24 micron images. Color-color and color-magnitude diagrams are presented using several combinations of IRAC, MIPS, and 2MASS magnitudes. The location of an individual PN in the color-color diagrams is seen to depend on the relative contributions of the spectral components which include molecular hydrogen, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), infrared forbidden line emission from the ionized gas, warm dust continuum, and emission directly from the central star. The sample of LMC PNe is compared to a number of Galactic PNe and found to not significantly differ in their position in color-color space. We also explore the potential value of IR PNe luminosity functions (LFs) in the LMC. IRAC LFs appear to follow the same functional form as the well-established [O III] LFs although there are several PNe with observed IR magnitudes brighter than the cut-offs in these LFs.
  • Color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) are presented for the Spitzer SAGE (Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution) survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). IRAC and MIPS 24 um epoch one data are presented. These data represent the deepest, widest mid-infrared CMDs of their kind ever produced in the LMC. Combined with the 2MASS survey, the diagrams are used to delineate the evolved stellar populations in the Large Magellanic Cloud as well as Galactic foreground and extragalactic background populations. Some 32000 evolved stars brighter than the tip of the red giant branch are identified. Of these, approximately 17500 are classified as oxygen-rich, 7000 carbon-rich, and another 1200 as ``extreme'' asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Brighter members of the latter group have been called ``obscured'' AGB stars in the literature owing to their dusty circumstellar envelopes. A large number (1200) of luminous oxygen--rich AGB stars/M supergiants are also identified. Finally, there is strong evidence from the 24 um MIPS channel that previously unexplored, lower luminosity oxygen-rich AGB stars contribute significantly to the mass loss budget of the LMC (1200 such sources are identified).
  • We present high angular resolution near--infrared images of the obscured Galactic Giant HII (GHII) region G333.1--0.4 in which we detect an OB star cluster. For G333.1--0.4, we find OB stars and other massive objects in very early evolutionary stages, possibly still accreting. We obtained $K$--band spectra of three stars; two show O type photospheric features, while the third has no photospheric features but does show CO 2.3 $\mu$m band--head emission. This object is at least as hot as an early B type star based on its intrinsic luminosity and is surrounded by a circumstellar disc/envelope which produces near infrared excess emission. A number of other relatively bright cluster members also display excess emission in the $K$--band, indicative of disks/envelopes around young massive stars. Based upon the O star photometry and spectroscopy, the distance to the cluster is 2.6 $\pm$ 0.4 kpc, similar to a recently derived kinematic (near side) value. The slope of the $K$--band luminosity function is similar to those found in other young clusters. The mass function slope is more uncertain, and we find $-1.3 \pm 0.2 < \Gamma < -1.1 \pm 0.2$- for stars with M $> 5$ M$_\odot$ where the upper an lower limits are calculated independently for different assumptions regarding the excess emission of the individual massive stars. The number of Lyman continuum photons derived from the contribution of all massive stars in the cluster is 0.2 $\times$ $10^{50}$ $s^{-1}$ $< NLyc < 1.9$ $\times$ $10^{50}$ $s^{-1}$. The integrated cluster mass is 1.0 $\times$ $10^{3}$ $M_\odot < M_{cluster} < 1.3$ $\times$ $10^{3}$ $M_\odot$.
  • High resolution (lambda / Delta-lambda = 50,000) K-band spectra of massive, embedded, young stellar objects are presented. The present sample consists of four massive young stars located in nascent clusters powering Galactic giant H II regions. Emission in the 2.3 micron 2--0 vibrational--rotational bandhead of CO is observed. A range of velocity broadened profiles seen in three of the objects is consistent with the emission arising from a circumstellar disk seen at various inclination angles. Br gamma spectra of the same spectral and spatial resolution are also presented which support an accretion disk or torus model for massive stars. In the fourth object, Br emission suggesting a rotating torus is observed, but the CO profile is narrow, indicating that there may be different CO emission mechanisms in massive stars and this is consistent with earlier observations of the BN object and MWC 349. To--date, only young massive stars of late O or early B types have been identified with clear accretion disk signatures in such embedded clusters. Often such stars are found in the presence of other more massive stars which are revealed by their photospheric spectra but which exhibit no disk signatures. This suggests the timescale for dissipating their disks is much faster than the less massive OB stars or that the most massive stars do not form with accretion disks.
  • We present R=550 to 1200 near infrared H and K spectra for a magnitude limited sample of 79 asymptotic giant branch and cool supergiant stars in the central ~ 5 pc (diameter) of the Galaxy. We use a set of similar spectra obtained for solar neighborhood stars with known Teff and Mbol that is in the same range as the Galactic center (GC) sample to derive Teff and Mbol for the GC sample. We then construct the Hertzsprung--Russell (HRD) diagram for the GC sample. Using an automated maximum likelihood routine, we derive a coarse star formation history of the GC. We find (1) roughly 75% of the stars formed in the central few pc are older than 5 Gyr; (2) the star formation rate (SFR) is variable over time, with a roughly 4 times higher star formation rate in the last 100 Myr compared to the average SFR; (3) our model can only match dynamical limits on the total mass of stars formed by limiting the IMF to masses above 0.7 M$_\odot$. This could be a signature of mass segregation or of the bias toward massive star formation from the unique star formation conditions in the GC; (4) blue supergiants account for 12 % of the total sample observed, and the ratio of red to blue supergiants is roughly 1.5; (5) models with isochrones with [Fe/H] = 0.0 over all ages fit the stars in our HRD better than models with lower [Fe/H] in the oldest age bins, consistent with the finding of Ramirez et al. (2000) that stars with ages between 10 Myr and 1 Gyr have solar [Fe/H].
  • We report optical and infrared spectroscopic observations of the Type Ia SN 1999ee and the Type Ib/c SN 1999ex, both of which were hosted by the galaxy IC 5179. For SN 1999ee we obtained a continuous sequence with an unprecedented wavelength and temporal coverage beginning 9 days before maximum light and extending through day 42. Before maximum light SN 1999ee displayed a normal spectrum with a strong Si II 6355 absorption, thus showing that not all slow-declining SNe are spectroscopically peculiar at these evolutionary phases. A comparative study of the infrared spectra of SN 1999ee and other Type Ia supernovae shows that there is a remarkable homogeneity among the Branch-normal SNe Ia during their first 60 days of evolution. SN 1991bg-like objects, on the other hand, display spectroscopic peculiarities at infrared wavelengths. SN 1999ex was characterized by the lack of hydrogen lines, weak optical He I lines, and strong He I 10830,20581, thus providing an example of an intermediate case between pure Ib and Ic supernovae. We conclude therefore that SN 1999ex provides first clear evidence for a link between the Ib and Ic classes and that there is a continuous spectroscopic sequence ranging from the He deficient SNe Ic to the SNe Ib which are characterized by strong optical He I lines.
  • Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope adaptive optics bonnette images through narrow-band filters in the $K-$band are presented for the Arches cluster. Continuum fluxes, line fluxes, and equivalent widths are derived from high angular resolution images, some near diffraction limited, for the well known massive stars in the Arches cluster. Images were obtained in the lines of \ion{He}{1} 2.06 \mic, \ion{H}{1} Br$\gamma$ (2.17 \mic), and \ion{He}{2} 2.19 \mic as well as continuum positions at 2.03 \mic, 2.14 \mic, and 2.26 \mic. In addition, fluxes are presented for \ion{H}{1} P$\alpha$ (1.87 \mic) and a nearby continuum position (1.90 \mic) from Hubble Space Telescope archival data. The 2 \mic and P$\alpha$ data reveal two new emission-line stars and three fainter candidate emission-line objects. Indications for a spectral change of one object between earlier observations in 1992/1993 and our data from 1999 are found. The ratio of \ion{He}{2} 2.19 \mic to Br$\gamma$ emission exhibits a narrow distribution among the stars, suggesting a narrow evolutionary spread centered predominantly on spectral types O4 If or Wolf-Rayet stars of the WN7 sub-type. From the approximate spectral types of the identified emission-line stars and comparisons with evolutionary models we infer a cluster age between $\sim$ 2 and 4.5 Myr.
  • We present near infrared (J, H, and K) photometry and moderate resolution (lambda/Deltalambda = 3000) K-band spectroscopy of the embedded stellar cluster in the giant H II region W31. Four of the brightest five cluster members are early O--type stars based on their spectra. We derive a spectro--photometric distance for W31 of 3.4 +/- 0.3 kpc using these new spectral types and infrared photometry. The brightest cluster source at K is a red object which lies in the region of the J - H vs. H - K color--color plot inhabited by stars with excess emission in the K-band. This point source has an H plus K-band spectrum which shows no photospheric features, which we interpret as being the result of veiling by local dust emission. Strong Brackett series emission and permitted FeII emission are detected in this source; the latter feature is suggestive of a dense inflow or outflow. The near infrared position of this red source is consistent with the position of a 5 GHz thermal radio source seen in previous high angular resolution VLA images. We also identify several other K-band sources containing excess emission with compact radio sources. These objects may represent stars in the W31 cluster still embedded in their birth cocoons.
  • We present near infrared J, H, and K images and K-band spectroscopy in the giant HII region W42. A massive star cluster is revealed; the color-color plot and K-band spectroscopic morphology of two of the brighter objects suggest the presence of young stellar objects. The spectrum of the bright central star is similar to unobscured stars with MK spectral types of O5-O6.5. If this star is on the zero age main sequence, then the derived spectrophotometric distance is considerably smaller than previous estimates. The Lyman continuum luminosity of the cluster is a few times that of the Trapezium. The slope of the K-band luminosity function is similar to that for the Trapezium cluster and significantly steeper than that for the massive star cluster in M17 or the Arches cluster near the Galactic center.
  • Near infrared images of the Galactic giant HII region W43 reveal a dense stellar cluster at its center. Broad band JHK photometry of the young cluster and K-band spectra of three of its bright stars are presented. The 2 micron spectrum of the brightest star in the cluster is very well matched to the spectra of Wolf-Rayet stars of sub-type WN7. Two other stars are identified as O type giants or supergiants by their NIII and CIV emission. The close spatial clustering of O and the hydrogen WN type stars is analogous to the intense star burst clusters R136 in the Large Magellanic Cloud and NGC3603 in the Galaxy.
  • We present 2 um narrow-band images of the core H II region in the Galactic star forming region Sagittarius D. The emission-line images are centered on 2.17 um (Brgamma) and 2.06 um (He I). The H II region appears at the edge of a well defined dark cloud, and the morphology suggests a blister geometry as pointed out in earlier radio continuum work. There is a deficit of stars in general in front of the associated dark cloud indicating the H II region is located in-between the Galactic center and the sun. The lesser spatial extent of the He I line emission relative to Brgamma places the effective temperature of the ionizing radiation field below 40,000 K. The He I 2.06 um to Brgamma ratio and Brgamma / far infrared dust emission put Teff at about 36,500 K to 40,000 K as derived from ionization models.
  • We present a new spectroscopic classification for OB stars based on H-band (1.5 micron to 1.8 micron) observations of a sample of stars with optical spectral types. Our initial sample of nine stars demonstrates that the combination of He I 1.7002 micron and H Brackett series absorption can be used to determine spectral types for stars between about O4 and B7 (to within about +/- 2 sub-types). We find that the Brackett series exhibits luminosity effects similar to the Balmer series for the B stars. This classification scheme will be useful in studies of optically obscured high mass star forming regions. In addition, we present spectra for the OB stars near 1.1 micron and 1.3 micron which may be of use in analyzing their atmospheres and winds.
  • New and existing K-band spectra for 19 Galactic center late-type stars have been analyzed along with representative spectra of disk and bulge M giants and supergiants. Absorption strengths for strong atomic and molecular features have been measured. The Galactic center stars generally exhibit stronger absorption features centered near Na I (2.206 mic) and Ca I (2.264 mic) than representative disk M stars at the same CO absorption strength. Based on the absolute K-band magnitudes and CO and H2O absorption strengths for the Galactic center stars and known M supergiants and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, we conclude that only IRS 7 must be a supergiant. Two other bright stars in our Galactic center sample are likely supergiants as well. The remaining bright, cool stars in the Galactic center that we have observed are most consistent with being intermediate mass/age AGB stars. We identify four of the Galactic center stars as long period variables based on their K-band spectral properties and associated photometric variability. Estimates of initial masses and ages for the GC stars suggest multiple epochs of star formation have occurred in the Galactic center over the last 7-100 Myr.
  • J, H, K, and L photometry for the stars in the central 2' (5 pc) of the Galaxy are presented. Using the observed J-H, H-K, and K-L colors and assumed intrinsic colors, we determine the interstellar extinction at 2.2 mic (A_K) for approximately 1100 individual stars. The mean A_K (= 3.3 mag) is similar to previous results, but we find that the reddening is highly variable and some stars are likely to be seen through A_K > 6 mag. The de-reddened K-band luminosity function points to a significantly brighter component to the stellar population (> 1.5 mag at K) than found in the stellar population in Baade's window, confirming previous work done at lower spatial resolution. The observed flux of all Galactic center stars with estimated Ko (de-reddened magnitude) </= 7.0 mag is approx 25 % of the total in the 2' X 2' field. Our observations confirm the recent finding that several bright M stars in the Galactic center are variable. Our photometry also establishes the near-infrared variability of the M1-2 supergiant, IRS 7.