• The reionization of the Universe is one of the most important topics of present day astrophysical research. The most plausible candidates for the reionization process are star-forming galaxies, which according to the predictions of the majority of the theoretical and semi-analytical models should dominate the HI ionizing background at z~3. We aim at measuring the Lyman continuum escape fraction, which is one of the key parameters to compute the contribution of star-forming galaxies to the UV background. We have used ultra-deep U-band imaging (U=30.2mag at 1sigma) by LBC/LBT in the CANDELS/GOODS-North field, as well as deep imaging in COSMOS and EGS fields, in order to estimate the Lyman continuum escape fraction of 69 star-forming galaxies with secure spectroscopic redshifts at 3.27<z<3.40 to faint magnitude limits (L=0.2L*, or equivalently M1500~-19). We have measured through stacks a stringent upper limit (<1.7% at 1sigma) for the relative escape fraction of HI ionizing photons from bright galaxies (L>L*), while for the faint population (L=0.2L*) the limit to the escape fraction is ~10%. We have computed the contribution of star-forming galaxies to the observed UV background at z~3 and we have found that it is not enough to keep the Universe ionized at these redshifts, unless their escape fraction increases significantly (>10%) at low luminosities (M1500>-19). We compare our results on the Lyman continuum escape fraction of high-z galaxies with recent estimates in the literature and discuss future prospects to shed light on the end of the Dark Ages. In the future, strong gravitational lensing will be fundamental to measure the Lyman continuum escape fraction down to faint magnitudes (M1500~-16) which are inaccessible with the present instrumentation on blank fields.
  • We study the stellar population properties of the IRAC-detected $6 \lesssim z \lesssim 10$ galaxy candidates from the Spitzer UltRa Faint SUrvey Program (SURFS UP). Using the Lyman Break selection technique, we find a total of 16 new galaxy candidates at $6 \lesssim z \lesssim 10$ with $S/N \geq 3$ in at least one of the IRAC $3.6\mu$m and $4.5\mu$m bands. According to the best mass models available for the surveyed galaxy clusters, these IRAC-detected galaxy candidates are magnified by factors of $\sim 1.2$--$5.5$. We find that the IRAC-detected $6 \lesssim z \lesssim 10$ sample is likely not a homogeneous galaxy population: some are relatively massive (stellar mass as high as $4 \times 10^9\,M_{\odot}$) and evolved (age $\lesssim 500$ Myr) galaxies, while others are less massive ($M_{\text{stellar}}\sim 10^8\,M_{\odot}$) and very young ($\sim 10$ Myr) galaxies with strong nebular emission lines that boost their rest-frame optical fluxes. We identify two Ly$\alpha$ emitters in our sample from the Keck DEIMOS spectra, one at $z_{\text{Ly}\alpha}=6.76$ (in RXJ1347) and one at $z_{\text{Ly}\alpha}=6.32$ (in MACS0454). We show that IRAC $[3.6]-[4.5]$ color, when combined with photometric redshift, can be used to identify galaxies likely with strong nebular emission lines within certain redshift windows.
  • We present a strong and weak lensing reconstruction of the massive cluster Abell 2744, the first cluster for which deep Hubble Frontier Field (HFF) images and spectroscopy from the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) are available. By performing a targeted search for emission lines in multiply imaged sources using the GLASS spectra, we obtain 5 high-confidence spectroscopic redshifts and 2 tentative ones. We confirm 1 strongly lensed system by detecting the same emission lines in all 3 multiple images. We also search for additional line emitters blindly and use the full GLASS spectroscopic catalog to test reliability of photometric redshifts for faint line emitters. We see a reasonable agreement between our photometric and spectroscopic redshift measurements, when including nebular emission in photometric redshift estimations. We introduce a stringent procedure to identify only secure multiple image sets based on colors, morphology, and spectroscopy. By combining 7 multiple image systems with secure spectroscopic redshifts (at 5 distinct redshift planes) with 18 multiple image systems with secure photometric redshifts, we reconstruct the gravitational potential of the cluster pixellated on an adaptive grid, using a total of 72 images. The resulting mass map is compared with a stellar mass map obtained from the deep Spitzer Frontier Fields data to study the relative distribution of stars and dark matter in the cluster. We find that the stellar to total mass ratio varies substantially across the cluster field, suggesting that stars do not trace exactly the total mass in this interacting system. The maps of convergence, shear, and magnification are made available in the standard HFF format.
  • We study of the role of major mergers (mass ratios >1:4) in driving size growth in high-redshift (1<z<2) spheroidal galaxies (SGs) with stellar masses between 10^9.5 MSun and 10^10.7 MSun. This is a largely unexplored mass range at this epoch, containing the progenitors of more massive SGs on which the bulk of the size-evolution literature is based. We visually split our SGs into systems that are relaxed and those that exhibit tidal features indicative of a recent merger. Numerical simulations indicate that, given the depth of our images, only tidal features due to major mergers will be detectable at these epochs (features from minor mergers being too faint), making the disturbed SGs a useful route for estimating major-merger-driven size growth. The disturbed SGs are offset in size from their relaxed counterparts, lying close to the upper envelope of the local size -- mass relation. The mean size ratio of the disturbed SGs to their relaxed counterparts is ~2. Combining this observed size growth with empirical major-merger histories from the literature suggests that the size evolution of a significant fraction (around two-thirds) of SGs in this mass range could be driven by major mergers. If, as is likely, our galaxies are progenitors of more massive M > 10^10.7 MSun SGs at z<1, then major mergers are also likely to play an important role in the size growth of at least some massive SGs in this mass range.
  • We study the evolution of the number density, as a function of the size, of passive early-type galaxies with a wide range of stellar masses 10^10<M*/Msun<10^11.5) from z~3 to z~1, exploiting the unique dataset available in the GOODS-South field, including the recently obtained WFC3 images as a part of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS). In particular, we select a sample of 107 massive (M*>10^10 M_sun), passive (SSFR<10^-2 Gyr^-1) and morphologically spheroidal galaxies at 1.2<z<3, taking advantage of the panchromatic dataset available for GOODS, including VLT, CFHT, Spitzer, Chandra and HST ACS+WFC3 data. We find that at 1<z<3 the passively evolving early-type galaxies are the reddest and most massive objects in the Universe, and we prove that a correlation between mass, morphology, color and star-formation activity is already in place at that epoch. We measure a significant evolution in the mass-size relation of passive early-type galaxies (ETGs) from z~3 to z~1, with galaxies growing on average by a factor of 2 in size in a 3 Gyr timescale only. We witness also an increase in the number density of passive ETGs of 50 times over the same time interval. We find that the first ETGs to form at z>2 are all compact or ultra-compact, while normal sized ETGs (meaning ETGs with sizes comparable to those of local counterparts of the same mass) are the most common ETGs only at z<1. The increase of the average size of ETGs at 0<z<1 is primarily driven by the appearance of new large ETGs rather than by the size increase of individual galaxies.
  • We present a measurement of the galaxy merger fraction and number density from observations in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field for 0.5<z<2.5. We fit the combination of broadband data and slitless spectroscopy of 1308 galaxies with stellar population synthesis models to select merging systems based on a stellar mass of >10^10 M_sol. When correcting for mass incompleteness, the major merger fraction is not simply proportional to (1+z)^m, but appears to peak at z_frac~=1.3+-0.4. From this merger fraction, we infer that ~42% of massive galaxies have undergone a major merger since z~1. We show that the major merger number density peaks at z_dens~1.2, which marks the epoch where major merging of massive galaxies is most prevalent. This critical redshift is comparable to the peak of the cosmic star formation rate density, and occurs roughly 2.6 Gyr earlier in cosmic time than the peak in the number density of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei. These observations support an indirect evolutionary link between merging, starburst, and active galaxies.