• This design report describes the construction plans for the world's first multi-pass SRF ERL. It is a 4-pass recirculating linac that recovers the beam's energy by 4 additional, decelerating passes. All beams are returned for deceleration in a single beam pipe with a large-momentum-aperture permanent magnet FFAG optics. Cornell University has been pioneering a new class of accelerators, Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs), with a new characteristic set of beam parameters. Technology has been prototyped that is essential for any high brightness electron ERL. This includes a DC electron source and an SRF injector Linac with world-record current and normalized brightness in a bunch train, a high-current linac cryomodule, and a high-power beam stop, and several diagnostics tools for high-current and high-brightness beams. All these are now being used to construct a novel one-cryomodule ERL in Cornell's Wilson Lab. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has designed a multi-turn ERL for eRHIC, where beam is transported more than 20 times around the 4km long RHIC tunnel. The number of transport lines is minimized by using two arcs with strongly-focusing permanent magnets that can control many beams of different energies. A collaboration between BNL and Cornell has been formed to investigate this multi-turn eRHIC ERL design by building a 4-turn, one-cryomodule ERL at Cornell. It also has a return loop built with strongly focusing permanent magnets and is meant to accelerate 40mA beam to 150MeV. This high-brightness beam will have applications beyond accelerator research, in industry, in nuclear physics, and in X-ray science.
  • Over the past years it became evident that the quality factor of a superconducting cavity is not only determined by its surface preparation procedure, but is also influenced by the way the cavity is cooled down. Moreover, different data sets exists, some of them indicate that a slow cool-down through the critical temperature is favourable while other data states the exact opposite. Even so there where speculations and some models about the role of thermo-currents and flux-pinning, the difference in behaviour remained a mystery. In this paper we will for the first time present a consistent theoretical model which we confirmed by data that describes the role of thermo-currents, driven by temperature gradients and material transitions. We will clearly show how they impact the quality factor of a cavity, discuss our findings, relate it to findings at other labs and develop mitigation strategies which especially addresses the issue of achieving high quality factors of so-called nitrogen doped cavities in horizontal test.
  • We present a generic formalism to describe Brownian motion of particles with intrinsic asymmetry and give predictions for the drift behavior in unbiased time-dependent force fields. Our findings are supported by molecular dynamics simulations.
  • We experimentally demonstrate the occurrence of negative absolute resistance (NAR) up to about $-1\Omega$ in response to an externally applied dc current for a shunted Nb-Al/AlO$_x$-Nb Josephson junction, exposed to a microwave current at frequencies in the GHz range. The realization (or not) of NAR depends crucially on the amplitude of the applied microwave current. Theoretically, the system is described by means of the resistively and capacitively shunted junction model in terms of a moderately damped, classical Brownian particle dynamics in a one-dimensional potential. We find excellent agreement of the experimental results with numerical simulations of the model.
  • Room temperature IH-type drift tube structures are used at different places now for the acceleration of ions with mass over charge ratios up to 65 and velocities between 0.016 c and 0.1 c. These structures have a high shunt impedance and allow the acceleration of very intense beams at high accelerating gradients. The overall power consumption of room temperature IH-mode structures is comparable with superconducting (sc) structures up to 2 MeV/u. With the KONUS [1] beam dynamics, the required transversal focusing elements, e.g. quadrupole triplets can be placed outside of multicell cavities, which is favourable for building sc H-mode cavities. The design principles and consequences to the geometry compared to room temperature (rt) cavities will be described. The results gained from numerical simulations show that a sc multi-gap H21(0)-mode cavity (CH-type) can be an alternative to the sc spoke-type or reentrant cavity structures up to beam energies around 150 MeV/u. The main cavity parameters and possible fabrication options will be discussed. [1] U. Ratzinger, Nucl. Intr. Meth., A 415 (1998) 229.