• The young planetary system {\beta} Pictoris is surrounded by a circumstellar disk of dust and gas. Because both dust and gas have a lifetime shorter than the system age, they need to be replenished continuously. The gas composition is partly known, but its location and its origin are still a puzzle. The gas source could be the exocomets (or so-called falling and evaporating bodies, FEBs), which are observed as transient features in absorption lines of refractory elements (Mg, Ca, and Fe) when they transit in front of the star at several tens of stellar radii. Nearly 1700 high-resolution spectra of {\beta} Pictoris have been obtained from 2003 to 2015 using the HARPS spectrograph. In these spectra, the circumstellar disk is always detected as a stable component among the numerous variable absorption signatures of transiting exocomets. Summing all the 1700 spectra allowed us to reach a signal-to-noise ratio higher than 1000, which is an unprecedentedly high number for a {\beta} Pictoris spectrum. It revealed many weak Fe I absorption lines of the circumstellar gas in more than ten excited states. These weak lines bring new information on the physical properties of the neutral iron gas in the circumstellar disk. The population of the first excited levels follows a Boltzmann distribution with a slope consistent with a gas temperature of about 1300 K; this temperature corresponds to a distance to the star of ~ 38 RStar and implies a turbulence of {\xi} ~ 0.8 km/s.
  • The young and nearby star \beta\ Pictoris (\beta\ Pic) is surrounded by a debris disk composed of dust and gas known to host a myriad evaporating exocomets, planetesimals and at least one planet. At an edge-on inclination, as seen from Earth, this system is ideal for debris disk studies providing an excellent opportunity to use absorption spectroscopy to study the planet forming environment. Using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) we observe the most abundant element in the disk, hydrogen, through the HI Lyman \alpha\ (Ly-\alpha\) line. We present a new technique to decrease the contamination of the Ly-\alpha\ line by geocoronal airglow in COS spectra. This Airglow Virtual Motion (AVM) technique allows us to shift the Ly-\alpha\ line of the astrophysical target away from the contaminating airglow emission revealing more of the astrophysical line profile. The column density of hydrogen in the \beta\ Pic stable gas disk at the stellar radial velocity is measured to be $\log(N_{\mathrm{H}}/1 \mathrm{cm}^2) \ll 18.5$. The Ly-\alpha\ emission line profile is found to be asymmetric and we propose that this is caused by HI falling in towards the star with a bulk radial velocity of $41\pm6$ km/s relative to \beta\ Pic and a column density of $\log(N_{\mathrm{H}}/1 \mathrm{cm}^2) = 18.6\pm0.1$. The high column density of hydrogen relative to the hydrogen content of CI chondrite meteorites indicates that the bulk of the hydrogen gas does not come from the dust in the disk. This column density reveals a hydrogen abundance much lower than solar, which excludes the possibility that the detected hydrogen could be a remnant of the protoplanetary disk or gas expelled by the star. We hypothesise that the hydrogen gas observed falling towards the star arises from the dissociation of water originating from evaporating exocomets.
  • We report new near ultraviolet HST/STIS observations of atmospheric absorptions during the planetary transit of HD209458b. We detect absorption in atomic magnesium (MgI), while no signal has been detected in the lines of singly ionized magnesium (MgII). We measure the MgI atmospheric absorption to be 6.2+/-2.9% in the velocity range from -62 to -19 km/s. The detection of atomic magnesium in the planetary upper atmosphere at a distance of several planetary radii gives a first view into the transition region between the thermosphere and the exobase, where atmospheric escape takes place. We estimate the electronic densities needed to compensate for the photo-ionization by dielectronic recombination of Mg+ to be in the range of 10^8-10^9 cm^{-3}. Our finding is in excellent agreement with model predictions at altitudes of several planetary radii. We observe MgI atoms escaping the planet, with a maximum radial velocity (in the stellar rest frame) of -60 km/s. Because magnesium is much heavier than hydrogen, the escape of this species confirms previous studies that the planet's atmosphere is undergoing hydrodynamic escape. We compare our observations to a numerical model that takes the stellar radiation pressure on the MgI atoms into account. We find that the MgI atoms must be present at up to ~7.5 planetari radii altitude and estimate an MgI escape rate of ~3x10^7 g/s. Compared to previous evaluations of the escape rate of HI atoms, this evaluation is compatible with a magnesium abundance roughly solar. A hint of absorption, detected at low level of significance, during the post-transit observations, could be interpreted as a MgI cometary-like tail. If true, the estimate of the absorption by MgI would be increased to a higher value of about 8.8+/-2.1%.
  • Atmospheric escape has been detected from the exoplanet HD 209458b through transit observations of the hydrogen Lyman-alpha line. Here we present spectrally resolved Lyman-alpha transit observations of the exoplanet HD 189733b at two different epochs. These HST/STIS observations show for the first time, that there are significant temporal variations in the physical conditions of an evaporating planetary atmosphere. While atmospheric hydrogen is not detected in the first epoch observations, it is observed at the second epoch, producing a transit absorption depth of 14.4+/-3.6% between velocities of -230 to -140 km/s. Contrary to HD 209458b, these high velocities cannot arise from radiation pressure alone and require an additional acceleration mechanism, such as interactions with stellar wind protons. The observed absorption can be explained by an atmospheric escape rate of neutral hydrogen atoms of about 10^9 g/s, a stellar wind with a velocity of 190 km/s and a temperature of ~10^5K. An X-ray flare from the active star seen with Swift/XRT 8 hours before the second-epoch observation supports the idea that the observed changes within the upper atmosphere of the planet can be caused by variations in the stellar wind properties, or by variations in the stellar energy input to the planetary escaping gas (or a mix of the two effects). These observations provide the first indication of interaction between the exoplanet's atmosphere and stellar variations.
  • An error was detected in the code used for the analysis of the HD209458b sodium profile (Vidal-Madjar et al. 2011). Here we present an updated T-P profile and briefly discuss the consequences.
  • A complete reassessment of the HST observations of the transits of the extrasolar planet HD209458b has provided a transmission spectrum of the atmosphere over a wide range of wavelengths. Analysis of the NaI absorption line profile has already shown that the sodium abundance has to drop by at least a factor of ten above a critical altitude. Here we analyze the profile in the deep core of the NaI doublet line from HST and high-resolution ground-based spectra to further constrain the vertical structure of the HD209458b atmosphere. With a wavelength-dependent cross section that spans more than 5 orders of magnitude, we use the absorption signature of the NaI doublet as an atmospheric probe. The NaI transmission features are shown to sample the atmosphere of HD209458b over an altitude range of more than 6500km, corresponding to a pressure range of 14 scale heights spanning 1 millibar to 1e-9 bar pressures. By comparing the observations with a multi-layer model in which temperature is a free parameter at the resolution of the atmospheric scale height, we constrain the temperature vertical profile and variations in the Na abundance in the upper part of the atmosphere of HD209458b. We find a rise in temperature above the drop in sodium abundance at the 3mbar level. We also identify an isothermal atmospheric layer at 1500+/-100K spanning almost 6 scale heights in altitude, from 1e-5 to 1e-7 bar. Above this layer, the temperature rises again to 2500(+1500/-1000)K at 1e-9 bar, indicating the presence of a thermosphere. The resulting temperature-pressure (T-P) profile agrees with the Na condensation scenario at the 3 mbar level, with a possible signature of sodium ionization at higher altitudes, near the 3e-5 bar level. Our T-P profile is found to be in good agreement with the profiles obtained with aeronomical models including hydrodynamic escape.
  • We present a new primary transit observation of the hot-jupiter HD189733b, obtained at 3.6 microns with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. Previous measurements at 3.6 microns suffered from strong systematics and conclusions could hardly be obtained with confidence on the water detection by comparison of the 3.6 and 5.8 microns observations. We use a high S/N Spitzer photometric transit light curve to improve the precision of the near infrared radius of the planet at 3.6 microns. The observation has been performed using high-cadence time series integrated in the subarray mode. We are able to derive accurate system parameters, including planet-to-star radius ratio, impact parameter, scale of the system, and central time of the transit from the fits of the transit light curve. We compare the results with transmission spectroscopic models and with results from previous observations at the same wavelength. We obtained the following system parameters: R_p/R_\star=0.15566+0.00011-0.00024, b=0.661+0.0053-0.0050, and a/R_\star=8.925+0.0490-0.0523 at 3.6 microns. These measurements are three times more accurate than previous studies at this wavelength because they benefit from greater observational efficiency and less statistic and systematic errors. Nonetheless, we find that the radius ratio has to be corrected for stellar activity and present a method to do so using ground-based long-duration photometric follow-up in the V-band. The resulting planet-to-star radius ratio corrected for the stellar variability is in agreement with the previous measurement obtained in the same bandpass (Desert et al. 2009). We also discuss that water vapour could not be evidenced by comparison of the planetary radius measured at 3.6 and 5.8 microns, because the radius measured at 3.6 microns is affected by absorption by other species, possibly Rayleigh scattering by haze.
  • We observed three transits of the extrasolar planet HD189733b in HI Lyman-alpha and in a few other lines in the ultraviolet with HST/ACS, in the search for atmospheric signatures. We detect a transit signature in the Lyman-alpha light curve with a transit depth of 5.05 +/- 0.75 %. This depth exceeds the occultation depth produced by the planetary disk alone at the 3.5-sigma level (statistical). Other stellar emission lines are less bright, and, taken individually, they do not show the transit signature, while the whole spectra redward of the Lyman-alpha line has enough photons to show a transit signature consistent with the absorption by the planetary disk alone. The transit depth's upper limits in the emission lines are 11.1% for OI at 1305A and 5.5% for CII at 1335A. The presence of an extended exosphere of atomic hydrogen around HD189733b producing 5% absorption of the full unresolved Lyman-alpha line flux shows that the planet is losing gas. The Lyman-alpha light curve is well-fitted by a numerical simulation of escaping hydrogen in which the planetary atoms are pushed by the stellar radiation pressure. We constrain the escape rate of atomic hydrogen to be between 10^9 and 10^{11} g/s and the ionizing extreme UV flux between 2 and 40 times the solar value (1-sigma), with larger escape rates corresponding to larger EUV flux. The best fit is obtained for dM/dt=10^{10} g/s and an EUV flux F_{EUV}=20 times the solar value. HD189733b is the second extrasolar planet for which atmospheric evaporation has been detected.
  • The EROS-2 project has been designed to search for microlensing events towards any dense stellar field. The densest parts of the Galactic spiral arms have been monitored to maximize the microlensing signal expected from the stars of the Galactic disk and bulge. 12.9 million stars have been monitored during 7 seasons towards 4 directions in the Galactic plane, away from the Galactic center. A total of 27 microlensing event candidates have been found. Estimates of the optical depths from the 22 best events are provided. A first order interpretation shows that simple Galactic models with a standard disk and an elongated bulge are in agreement with our observations. We find that the average microlensing optical depth towards the complete EROS-cataloged stars of the spiral arms is $\bar{\tau} =0.51\pm .13\times 10^{-6}$, a number that is stable when the selection criteria are moderately varied. As the EROS catalog is almost complete up to $I_C=18.5$, the optical depth estimated for the sub-sample of bright target stars with $I_C<18.5$ ($\bar{\tau}=0.39\pm >.11\times 10^{-6}$) is easier to interpret. The set of microlensing events that we have observed is consistent with a simple Galactic model. A more precise interpretation would require either a better knowledge of the distance distribution of the target stars, or a simulation based on a Galactic model. For this purpose, we define and discuss the concept of optical depth for a given catalog or for a limiting magnitude.
  • A number of microlensing dark-matter surveys have produced tens of millions of light curves of individual background stars. These data provide an unprecedented opportunity for systematic studies of whole classes of variable stars and their host galaxies. We aim to use the EROS-2 survey of the Magellanic Clouds to detect and study the population of beat Cepheids (BCs) in both Clouds. BCs pulsating simultaneously in the first overtone and fundamental modes (FO/F) or in the second and first overtone modes (SO/FO) are of particular interest. Using special software designed to search for periodic variables, we have scanned the EROS-2 data base for variables in the typical period range of Cepheids. Metallicities of FO/F objects were then calculated from linear nonadiabatic convective stellar models. We identify 74 FO/F BCs in the LMC and 41 in the SMC, and 173 and 129 SO/FO pulsators in the LMC and SMC, respectively; 185 of these stars are new discoveries. For nearly all the FO/F objects we determine minimum, mean, and maximum values of the metallicity. The EROS data have expanded the samples of known BCs in the LMC by 31%, in the SMC by 110%. The FO/F objects provide independent measures of metallicities in these galaxies. The mean value of metallicity is 0.0045 in the LMC and 0.0018 in the SMC.
  • Extrasolar planetary transits are powerful tools to probe their atmosphere and to extract key physical properties of planets, like their mean densities, chemical compositions, or atmospheric structures. Every 3.5 days, the transits of the gaseous planet orbiting HD209458 offer the opportunity to investigate the spectral features of its atmosphere. We present here NUV transmission spectroscopy of the transiting extrasolar planet HD209458b using HST/ACS. We show the data analysis of the seven HST orbits which were used to observe two transits of HD209458b. Due to various remaining systematics, the radius of the planet in the NUV could not be extracted with a high precison. However, we derived a radius of Rp=1.4Rjup+/-0.08 between 2800 and 3100 AA which is consistent with previous measurements in the visible.
  • The presence of titanium oxide (TiO) and vanadium oxide (VO) gas phase species is searched for in the atmosphere of the hot Jupiter HD209458b. We compared a model for the planets transmitted spectrum to multi-wavelength eclipse-depth measurements (from 3000 to 10000 Angstrom), obtained by Sing et al. (2008a) using archived HST-STIS time series spectra. We make use of these observations to search for spectral signatures from extra absorbers in the planet atmosphere between 6000 and 8000 Angstrom. Along with sodium depletion and Rayleigh scattering recently published for this exoplanet atmosphere, an extra absorber of uncertain origin, redward of the sodium lines, resides in the atmosphere of the planet. Furthermore, this planet has a stratosphere experiencing a thermal inversion caused by the capture of optical stellar flux by absorbers that resides at altitude. Recent models have predicted that the presence of TiO and VO in the atmosphere of HD209458b may be responsible for this temperature inversion. Although no specific TiO and VO spectral band head signatures have been identified unambiguously in the observed spectrum, we suggest here that the opacities of those molecules are possible candidates to explain the remaining continuous broad band absorption observed between 6200 and 8000 Angstrom. To match reasonably well the data, the abundances of TiO and VO molecules are evaluated from ten to one thousand times below solar. This upper limit result is in agreement with expected variations with altitude due to depletion effects such as condensation.
  • Transiting planets like HD209458b offer a unique opportunity to scrutinize their atmospheric composition and structure. Transit spectroscopy probes the transition region between the day and night sides, called limb. We present a re-analysis of existing archived HST/STIS transmission spectra of HD209458b's atmosphere. From these observations we: Identify H2 Rayleigh scattering, derive the absolute Sodium abundance and quantify its depletion in the upper atmosphere, extract a stratospheric T-P profile with a temperature inversion and explain broad band absorptions with the presence of TiO and VO molecules in the atmosphere of this planet.
  • For seven years, the EROS-2 project obtained a mass of photometric data on variable stars. We present a peculiar Cepheid-like star, in the direction of the Small Magellanic Cloud, which demonstrates unusual photometric behaviour over a short time interval. We report on data of the photometry acquired by the MARLY telescope and spectroscopy from the EFOSC instrument for this star, called EROS2 J005135-714459(sm0060n13842), which resembles the unusual Cepheid HR 7308. The light curve of our target is analysed using the Analysis of Variance method to determine a pulsational period of 5.5675 days. A fit of time-dependent Fourier coefficients is performed and a search for proper motion is conducted. The light curve exhibits a previously unobserved and spectacular change in both mean magnitude and amplitude, which has no clear theoretical explanation. Our analysis of the spectrum implies a radial velocity of 104 km s$^{-1}$ and a metallicity of -0.4$\pm$0.2 dex. In the direction of right ascension, we measure a proper motion of 17.4$\pm$6.0 mas yr$^{-1}$ using EROS astrometry, which is compatible with data from the NOMAD catalogue. The nature of EROS2 J005135-714459(sm0060n13842) remains unclear. For this star, we may have detected a non-zero proper motion for this star, which would imply that it is a foreground object. Its radial velocity, pulsational characteristics, and photometric data, however, suggest that it is instead a Cepheid-like object located in the SMC. In such a case, it would present a challenge to conventional Cepheid models.
  • Following re-analysis of Hubble Space Telescope observations of primary transits of the extrasolar planet HD209458b at Lyman-alpha, Ben-Jaffel (2007, BJ007) claims that no sign of evaporation is observed. Here we show that, in fact, this new analysis is consistent with the one of Vidal-Madjar et al. (2003, VM003) and supports the detection of evaporation. The apparent disagreement is mainly due to the disparate wavelength ranges that are used to derive the transit absorption depth. VM003 derives a (15+/-4)% absorption depth during transit over the core of the stellar Lyman-alpha line (from -130 km/s to +100 km/s), and this result agrees with the (8.9+/-2.1)% absorption depth reported by BJ007 from a slightly expanded dataset but over a larger wavelength range (+/-200 km/s). These measurements agree also with the (5+/-2)% absorption reported by Vidal-Madjar et al. (2004) over the whole Lyman-alpha line from independent, lower-resolution data. We show that stellar Lyman-alpha variability is unlikely to significantly affect those detections. The HI atoms must necessarily have velocities above the escape velocities and/or be outside the Roche lobe, given the lobe shape and orientation. Absorption by HI in HD209458b's atmosphere has thus been detected with different datasets, and now with independent analyses. All these results strengthen the concept of evaporating hot-Jupiters, as well as the modelization of this phenomenon.
  • The EROS-2 project was designed to test the hypothesis that massive compact halo objects (the so-called ``machos'') could be a major component of the dark matter halo of the Milky Way galaxy. To this end, EROS-2 monitored over 6.7 years $33\times10^6$ stars in the Magellanic clouds for microlensing events caused by such objects. In this work, we use only a subsample of $7\times10^6$ bright stars spread over $84 \deg^2$ of the LMC and $9 \deg^2$ of the SMC. The strategy of using only bright stars helps to discriminate against background events due to variable stars and allows a simple determination of the effects of source confusion (blending). The use of a large solid angle makes the survey relatively insensitive to effects that could make the optical depth strongly direction dependent. Using this sample of bright stars, only one candidate event was found, whereas $\sim39$ events would have been expected if the Halo were entirely populated by objects of mass $M\sim0.4M_{\odot}$. Combined with the results of EROS-1, this implies that the optical depth toward the Large Magellanic Cloud (\object{LMC}) due to such lenses is $\tau<0.36\times10^{-7}$ (95%CL), corresponding to a fraction of the halo mass of less than 8%. This optical depth is considerably less than that measured by the MACHO collaboration in the central region of the LMC. More generally, machos in the mass range $0.6\times10^{-7}M_\odot<M<15M_{\odot}$ are ruled out as the primary occupants of the Milky Way Halo.
  • Damped Lyman-alpha absorbers (DLAs), seen in absorption against a background quasar, provide the most detailed probes available of element abundances in the Universe over > 90 % of its age. DLAs can be used to observationally measure the global mean metallicity in the Universe and its evolution with time. Paradoxically, these observations are more difficult at lower redshifts, where the absorber rest-frame UV spectra are cut-off due to the atmospheric absorption. We present here high-resolution VLT/UVES observations of several elements contained in three DLAs and one sub-DLA with 0.6<z_abs<0.9. We detect Mg I, Mg II, Fe II, Zn II, Cr II, Mn II, Ti II and Ca II. Our observations more than double the high-resolution sample of [Zn/H] at z<1. We also report the discovery of three metal-rich systems, whereas most previous measurements show low N(HI)-weighted mean metallicity projecting to about 1/6th solar level at z=0. We derive [Zn/H]=-0.11+/-0.04 at z_abs=0.725, [Zn/H]=-0.54+/-0.20 at z_abs=0.740 and [Zn/H]=-0.49+/-0.22 at z_abs=0.652, plus one additional upper limit ([Zn/H]<-0.36 at z_abs=0.842). These measurements confirm the existence of quasar absorbers with relatively high metallicities based on abundance estimates free from the effect of dust depletion. Possible implications of these results for the metallicity of neutral gas phase in the past ~ 8 Gyr are presented and compared with models.
  • We present a new EROS-2 measurement of the microlensing optical depth toward the Galactic Bulge. Light curves of $5.6\times 10^{6}$ clump-giant stars distributed over $66 \deg^2$ of the Bulge were monitored during seven Bulge seasons. 120 events were found with apparent amplifications greater than 1.6 and Einstein radius crossing times in the range $5 {\rm d}<t_\e <400 {\rm d}$. This is the largest existing sample of clump-giant events and the first to include northern Galactic fields. In the Galactic latitude range $1.4\degr<|b|<7.0\degr$, we find $\tau/10^{-6}=(1.62 \pm 0.23)\exp[-a(|b|-3 {\rm deg})]$ with $a=(0.43 \pm0.16)\deg^{-1}$. These results are in good agreement with our previous measurement, with recent measurements of the MACHO and OGLE-II groups, and with predictions of Bulge models.
  • The metallicity in portions of high-redshift galaxies has been successfully measured thanks to the gas observed in absorption in the spectra of quasars, in the Damped Lyman-alpha systems (DLAs). Surprisingly, the global mean metallicity derived from DLAs is about 1/10th solar at 0<z<4 leading to the so-called ``missing-metals problem''. In this paper, we present high-resolution observations of a sub-DLA system at z_abs=0.716 with super-solar metallicity toward SDSS J1323-0021. This is the highest metallicity intervening quasar absorber currently known, and is only the second super-solar absorber known to date. We provide a detailed study of this unique object from VLT/UVES spectroscopy. We derive [Zn/H]=+0.61, [Fe/H]=-0.51, [Cr/H]=<-0.53, [Mn/H] = -0.37, and [Ti/H] = -0.61. Observations and photoionisation models using the CLOUDY software confirm that the gas in this sub-DLA is predominantly neutral and that the abundance pattern is probably significantly different from a Solar pattern. Fe/Zn and Ti/Zn vary among the main velocity components by factors of \~ 3 and ~ 35, respectively, indicating non-uniform dust depletion. Mn/Fe is super-solar in almost all components, and varies by a factor of ~ 3 among the dominant components. It would be interesting to observe more sub-DLA systems and determine whether they might contribute significantly toward the cosmic budget of metals.
  • We present FUSE and HST/STIS measurements of the PII column density toward Galactic stars. We analyzed PII through the profile fitting of the unsaturated $\lambda$1125 and $\lambda$1533 lines and derived column densities integrated along the sightlines as well as in individual resolved components. We find that phosphorus is not depleted along those sightlines sampling the diffuse neutral gas. We also investigate the correlation existing between PII and OI column densities and find that there is no differential depletion between these two specie. Furthermore, the ratio N(PII)/N(OI) is consistent with the solar P/O value, implying that PII and OI coexist in the same gaseous phase and are likely to evolve in parallel since the time they are produced in stars. We argue that phosphorus, as traced by PII, is an excellent neutral oxygen tracer in various physical environments, except when ionization corrections are a significant issue. Hence, PII lines (observable with FUSE, HST/STIS, or with VLT/UVES for the QSO sightlines) reveal particularly useful as a proxy for OI lines when these are saturated or blended.
  • We report on the detection of pulsations in the far ultraviolet (hereafter FUV) light curves of PG1219+534, PG1605+072, and PG1613+426 obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) in time-tagged mode (TTAG). Exposures of the order of a few Ksecs were sufficient to observe the main frequencies of PG1219+534 and PG1605+072 and confirm the detection of a pulsation mode at the surface of PG1613+426 as reported from ground. For the first time we derive time-resolved spectroscopic FUSE data of a sdB pulsator (PG1605+072) and comment its line profile variation diagram (hereafter lpv diagram). We observe the phase shift between the maximum luminosity and the maximum radius to be consistent with the model of an adiabatic pulsator. We also present evidence that the line broadening previously reported is not caused by rotation but is rather an observational bias due to the rapid Doppler shift of the lines with 17 km.s-1 amplitude. Thus our observations do not support the previous claim that PG1605+072 is (or will evolve into) an unusually fast rotating degenerate dwarf. These results demonstrate the asteroseismological potential of the FUSE satellite which should be viewed as another powerful means of investigation of stellar pulsations along with the MOST and COROT missions.
  • We present a study of the high rotational bands (J > 2) of H2 toward 4 early type galactic stars: HD 73882, HD 192639, HD 206267, and HD 207538. In each case, the velocity dispersion - characterized by the spectrum fitting parameter b - increases with the level of excitation, a phenomenon that has previously been detected by the Copernicus and IMAPS observatories. In particular, we show with 4 sigma confidence that for HD 192639 it is not possible to fit all J levels with a single b value, and that higher b values are needed for the higher levels. The amplitude of the line broadening, which can be as high as 10 km s^-1, makes explanations such as inhomogeneous spatial distribution unlikely. We investigate a mechanism in which the broadening is due to the molecules that are rotationally excited through the excess energy acquired after their formation on a grain (H2-formation pumping). We show that different dispersions would be a natural consequence of this mechanism. We note however that such process would require a formation rate 10 times higher then what was inferred from other observations. In view of the difficulty to account for the velocity dispersion as thermal broadening (T would be around 10,000 K), we conclude then that we are most certainly observing some highly turbulent warm layer associated with the cold diffuse cloud. Embedded in a magnetic field, it could be responsible for the high quantities of CH+ measured in the cold neutral medium.
  • The hot subdwarf B (sdB) stars form an homogeneous group populating an extension of the horizontal branch (HB) in the ($T_{\rm eff}$--$\log g$) diagram towards temperatures up to 40,000 K. The recent discovery that many of them are multimode pulsators has triggered a large observational and theoretical effort. We discuss the possibility of performing space-based asteroseismology with {\em FUSE}, and we demonstrate that periodic luminosity variations are already detectable in archival TTAG data of sdB stars. In particular, we report on the {\em FUSE} observation of the pulsator PF 1219+534, which shows the presence of periodic variations at 6.9 mHz and 7.8 mHz, consistent with those reported from ground--based observations.
  • We present column density measurements of the HD molecule in the interstellar gas toward 17 Galactic stars. The values for the seven most heavily reddened sightlines, with E(B-V) = 0.38-0.72, are derived from observations with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). The other ten values are from a reanalysis of spectra obtained with Copernicus. In all cases, high-resolution ground-based observations of KI and/or the CH molecule were used to constrain the gas velocity structure and to correct for saturation effects. Comparisons of the column densities HD, CH, CN, and KI in these 17 sightlines indicate that HD is most tightly correlated with CH. Stringent lower limits to the interstellar D/H ratio, derived from the HD/2H2 ratio, range from 3.7 10^(-7) to 4.3 10^(-6). Our results also suggest that the HD/H2 ratio increases with the molecular fraction f(H2) and that the interstellar D/H ratio might be obtained from HD by probing clouds with f(H2) = 1. Finally, we note an apparent relationship between the molecular fractions of hydrogen and deuterium.
  • We present the type Ia rate measurement based on two EROS supernova search campaigns (in 1999 and 2000). Sixteen supernovae identified as type Ia were discovered. The measurement of the detection efficiency, using a Monte Carlo simulation, provides the type Ia supernova explosion rate at a redshift ~ 0.13. The result is $0.125^{+0.044+0.028}_{-0.034-0.028} h_{70}^2$ SNu where 1 SNu = 1 SN / $10^{10} L_{sun}^B$ / century. This value is compatible with the previous EROS measurement (Hardin et al. 2000), done with a much smaller sample, at a similar redshift. Comparison with other values at different redshifts suggests an evolution of the type Ia supernova rate.