• Plasma dark matter, which arises in dissipative dark matter models, can give rise to large annual modulation signals from keV electron recoils. Previous work has argued that the DAMA annual modulation signal might be explained in such a scenario. Detailed predictions are difficult due to the inherent complexities involved in modelling the halo plasma interactions with Earth-bound dark matter. Here, we consider a simple phenomenological model for the dark matter velocity function relevant for direct detection experiments, and confront the resulting electron scattering rate with the new DAMA/LIBRA phase 2 data. We also consider the constraints from other experiments, including XENON100 and DarkSide-50.
  • Dissipative dark matter arising from a hidden sector consisting of $N_{\rm sec}$ exact copies of the Standard Model is discussed. The particles from each sector interact with those from the other sectors by gravity and via the kinetic mixing interaction, described by the dimensionless parameter, $\epsilon$. It has been known for some time that models of this kind are consistent with large scale structure and the cosmic microwave background measurements. Here, we argue that such models can potentially explain various observations on small scales, including the observed paucity and planar distribution of satellite galaxies, the flat velocity function of field galaxies, and the structure of galaxy halos. The value of the kinetic mixing parameter is estimated to be $\epsilon \approx 1.2 \times 10^{-10}$ for $N_{\rm sec} = 5$, the example studied in most detail here. We also comment on cluster constraints such as those which arise from the Bullet cluster.
  • Within the mirror dark matter model and dissipative dark matter models in general, halos around galaxies with active star formation (including spirals and gas rich dwarfs) are dynamical: they expand and contract in response to heating and cooling processes. Ordinary Type II supernovae (SN) can provide the dominant heat source, possible if kinetic mixing interaction exists with strength $\epsilon \sim 10^{-9} - 10^{-10}$. Dissipative dark matter halos can be modelled as a fluid governed by Euler's equations. Around sufficiently isolated and unperturbed galaxies the halo can relax to a steady state configuration, where heating and cooling rates locally balance and hydrostatic equilibrium prevails. These steady state conditions can be solved to derive the physical properties, including the halo density and temperature profiles, for model galaxies. Here, we have considered idealized spherically symmetric galaxies within the mirror dark particle model, as in the earlier paper [paper I, arXiv:1707.02528], but we have assumed that the local halo heating in the SN vicinity dominates over radiative sources. With this assumption, physically interesting steady state solutions arise which we compute for a representative range of model galaxies. The end result is a rather simple description of the dark matter halo around idealized spherically symmetric systems, characterized in principle by only one parameter, with physical properties that closely resemble the empirical properties of disk galaxies.
  • Dissipative dark matter, where dark matter particle properties closely resemble familiar baryonic matter, is considered. Mirror dark matter, which arises from an isomorphic hidden sector, is a specific and theoretically constrained scenario. Other possibilities include models with more generic hidden sectors that contain massless dark photons (unbroken $U(1)$ gauge interactions). Such dark matter not only features dissipative cooling processes, but is also assumed to have nontrivial heating sourced by ordinary supernovae (facilitated by the kinetic mixing interaction). The dynamics of dissipative dark matter halos around rotationally supported galaxies, influenced by heating as well as cooling processes, can be modelled by fluid equations. For a sufficiently isolated galaxy with stable star formation rate, the dissipative dark matter halos are expected to evolve to a steady state configuration which is in hydrostatic equilibrium and where heating and cooling rates locally balance. Here, we take into account the major cooling and heating processes, and numerically solve for the steady state solution under the assumptions of spherical symmetry, negligible dark magnetic fields, and that supernova sourced energy is transported to the halo via dark radiation. For the parameters considered, and assumptions made, we were unable to find a physically realistic solution for the constrained case of mirror dark matter halos. Halo cooling generally exceeds heating at realistic halo mass densities. This problem can be rectified in more generic dissipative dark matter models, and we discuss a specific example in some detail.
  • Mirror dark matter, where dark matter resides in a hidden sector exactly isomorphic to the standard model, can be probed via direct detection experiments by both nuclear and electron recoils if the kinetic mixing interaction exists. In fact, the kinetic mixing interaction appears to be a prerequisite for consistent small scale structure: Mirror dark matter halos around spiral galaxies are dissipative - losing energy via dark photon emission. This ongoing energy loss requires a substantial energy input, which can be sourced from ordinary supernovae via kinetic mixing induced processes in the supernova's core. Astrophysical considerations thereby give a lower limit on the kinetic mixing strength, and indeed lower limits on both nuclear and electron recoil rates in direct detection experiments can be estimated. We show here that potentially all of the viable parameter space will be probed in forthcoming XENON experiments including LUX and XENON1T. Thus, we anticipate that these experiments will provide a definitive test of the mirror dark matter hypothesis.
  • For many years annually modulating $\sim$ keV scintillations have been observed in the DAMA/NaI and DAMA/Libra experiments. A dark matter - electron scattering interpretation is now favoured given the stringent constraints on nuclear recoil rates obtained by LUX, SuperCDMS and other experiments. Very recently, the XENON100 experiment has observed a modest annual modulation in their electron recoil events (2.8 $\sigma$ C.L.) with phase consistent with that of the DAMA experiments. However, they also found a stringent upper limit on the unmodulated rate, which suggests that any dark matter - electron scattering interpretation of these annual modulations must involve a large modulation fraction $\stackrel{>}{\sim} 50\%$. Here we discuss the extent to which these results might be able to be accommodated within multi-component dark matter models featuring light dark matter particles of mass $\sim$ MeV, focusing on the mirror dark matter case for definiteness. The importance of diurnal variation as a means of testing these kinds of models is also discussed.
  • There is ample evidence from rotation curves that dark matter halos around disk galaxies have nontrivial dynamics. Of particular significance are: a) the cored dark matter profile of disk galaxies, b) correlations of the shape of rotation curves with baryonic properties, and c) Tully-Fisher relations. Dark matter halos around disk galaxies may have nontrivial dynamics if dark matter is strongly self interacting and dissipative. Multicomponent hidden sector dark matter featuring a massless `dark photon' (from an unbroken dark $U(1)$ gauge interaction) which kinetically mixes with the ordinary photon provides a concrete example of such dark matter. The kinetic mixing interaction facilitates halo heating by enabling ordinary supernovae to be a source of these `dark photons'. Dark matter halos can expand and contract in response to the heating and cooling processes, but for a sufficiently isolated halo could have evolved to a steady state or `equilibrium' configuration where heating and cooling rates locally balance. This dynamics allows the dark matter density profile to be related to the distribution of ordinary supernovae in the disk of a given galaxy. In a previous paper a simple and predictive formula was derived encoding this relation. Here we improve on previous work by modelling the supernovae distribution via the measured UV and $H\alpha$ fluxes, and compare the resulting dark matter halo profiles with the rotation curve data for each dwarf galaxy in the LITTLE THINGS sample. The dissipative dark matter concept is further developed and some conclusions drawn.
  • Dissipative dark matter, where dark matter particles interact with a massless (or very light) boson, is studied. Such dark matter can arise in simple hidden sector gauge models, including those featuring an unbroken $U(1)'$ gauge symmetry, leading to a dark photon. Previous work has shown that such models can not only explain the LSS and CMB, but potentially also dark matter phenomena on small scales, such as the inferred cored structure of dark matter halos. In this picture, dark matter halos of disk galaxies not only cool via dissipative interactions but are also heated via ordinary supernovae (facilitated by an assumed photon - dark photon kinetic mixing interaction). This interaction between the dark matter halo and ordinary baryons, a very special feature of these types of models, plays a critical role in governing the physical properties of the dark matter halo. Here, we further study the implications of this type of dissipative dark matter for disk galaxies. Building on earlier work, we develop a simple formalism which aims to describe the effects of dissipative dark matter in a fairly model independent way. This formalism is then applied to generic disk galaxies. We also consider specific examples, including NGC 1560 and a sample of dwarf galaxies from the LITTLE THINGS survey. We find that dissipative dark matter, as developed here, does a fairly good job accounting for the rotation curves of the galaxies considered. Not only does dissipative dark matter explain the linear rise of the rotational velocity of dwarf galaxies at small radii, but it can also explain the observed wiggles in rotation curves which are known to be correlated with corresponding features in the disk gas distribution.
  • A simple way of explaining dark matter without modifying known Standard Model physics is to require the existence of a hidden (dark) sector, which interacts with the visible one predominantly via gravity. We consider a hidden sector containing two stable particles charged under an unbroken $U(1)^{'}$ gauge symmetry, hence featuring dissipative interactions. The massless gauge field associated with this symmetry, the dark photon, can interact via kinetic mixing with the ordinary photon. In fact, such an interaction of strength $\epsilon \sim 10 ^{-9}$ appears to be necessary in order to explain galactic structure. We calculate the effect of this new physics on Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and its contribution to the relativistic energy density at Hydrogen recombination. We then examine the process of dark recombination, during which neutral dark states are formed, which is important for large-scale structure formation. Galactic structure is considered next, focussing on spiral and irregular galaxies. For these galaxies we modelled the dark matter halo (at the current epoch) as a dissipative plasma of dark matter particles, where the energy lost due to dissipation is compensated by the energy produced from ordinary supernovae (the core-collapse energy is transferred to the hidden sector via kinetic mixing induced processes in the supernova core). We find that such a dynamical halo model can reproduce several observed features of disk galaxies, including the cored density profile and the Tully-Fisher relation. We also discuss how elliptical and dwarf spheroidal galaxies could fit into this picture. Finally, these analyses are combined to set bounds on the parameter space of our model, which can serve as a guideline for future experimental searches.
  • The annually modulating $\sim$ keV scintillations observed in the DAMA/NaI and DAMA/Libra experiments might be due to dark matter - electron scattering. Such an explanation is now favoured given the stringent constraints on nuclear recoil rates obtained by LUX, SuperCDMS and other experiments. We suggest that multi-component dark matter models featuring light dark matter particles of mass $\sim$ MeV can potentially explain the data. A specific example, kinetically mixed mirror dark matter, is shown to have the right broad properties to consistently explain the experiments via dark matter - electron scattering. If this is the explanation of the annual modulation signal found in the DAMA experiments then a sidereal diurnal modulation signal is also anticipated. We point out that the data from the DAMA experiments show a diurnal variation at around 2.3$\sigma$ C.L. with phase consistent with that expected. This electron scattering interpretation of the DAMA experiments can potentially be probed in large xenon experiments (LUX, XENON1T,...), as well as in low threshold experiments (CoGeNT, CDEX, C4, ...) by searching for annually and diurnally modulated electron recoils.
  • If dark matter is dissipative then the distribution of dark matter within galactic halos can be governed by dissipation, heating and hydrostatic equilibrium. Previous work has shown that a specific model, in the framework of mirror dark matter, can explain several empirical galactic scaling relations. It is shown here that this dynamical halo model implies a quasi-isothermal dark matter density, $\rho (r) = \rho_0 r_0^2/(r^2 + r_0^2)$, where the core radius, $r_0$, scales with disk scale length, $r_D$, via $r_0/{\rm kpc} = 1.4\left(r_D/{\rm kpc}\right)$. Additionally, the product $\rho_0 r_0$ is roughly $constant$, i.e. independent of galaxy size (the $constant$ is set by the parameters of the model). The derived dark matter density profile implies that the galactic rotation velocity satisfies the Tully-Fisher relation, $L_B \propto v^{3}_{max}$, where $v_{max}$ is the maximal rotational velocity. Examples of rotation curves resulting from this dynamics are given.
  • A simple way to accommodate dark matter is to postulate the existence of a hidden sector. That is, a set of new particles and forces interacting with the known particles predominantly via gravity. In general this leads to a large set of unknown parameters, however if the hidden sector is an exact copy of the standard model sector, then an enhanced symmetry arises. This symmetry, which can be interpreted as space-time parity, connects each ordinary particle ($e, \ \nu, \ p, \ n, \ \gamma, ....)$ with a mirror partner ($e', \ \nu', \ p', \ n', \ \gamma', ...)$. If this symmetry is completely unbroken, then the mirror particles are degenerate with their ordinary particle counterparts, and would interact amongst themselves with exactly the same dynamics that govern ordinary particle interactions. The only new interaction postulated is photon - mirror photon kinetic mixing, whose strength $\epsilon$, is the sole new fundamental (Lagrangian) parameter relevant for astrophysics and cosmology. It turns out that such a theory, with suitably chosen initial conditions effective in the very early Universe, can provide an adequate description of dark matter phenomena provided that $\epsilon \sim 10^{-9}$. This review focuses on three main developments of this mirror dark matter theory during the last decade: Early universe cosmology, galaxy structure and the application to direct detection experiments.
  • Recently, the CDMS/Si experiment has observed a low energy excess of events in their dark matter search. In light of this new result we update the mirror dark matter explanation of the direction detection experiments. We find that the DAMA, CoGeNT, CRESST-II and CDMS/Si data can be simultaneously explained by halo $\sim Fe'$ interactions provided that $v_{rot} \approx 200$ km/s. Other parameter space is also possible. Forthcoming experiments, including CDMSlite, CDEX, COUPP, LUX, C-4,... should be able to further scrutinize mirror dark matter and closely related hidden sector models in the near future.
  • Mirror dark matter, and other similar dissipative dark matter candidates, need an energy source to stabilize dark matter halos in spiral galaxies. It has been suggested previously that ordinary supernovae can potentially supply the required energy. By matching the energy supplied to the halo from supernovae to that lost due to radiative cooling, we here derive a rough scaling relation, $R_{SN} \propto \rho_0 r_0^2$ ($R_{SN}$ is the supernova rate and $\rho_0, \ r_0$ the dark matter central density and core radius). Such a relation is consistent with dark matter properties inferred from studies of spiral galaxies with halo masses larger than $3\times 10^{11} M_\odot$. We speculate that other observed galaxy regularities might be explained within the framework of such dissipative dark matter.
  • Recent observations indicate that about half of the dwarf satellite galaxies around M31 orbit in a thin plane approximately aligned with the Milky Way. It has been argued that this observation along with several other features can be explained if these dwarf satellite galaxies originated as tidal dwarf galaxies formed during an ancient merger event. However if dark matter is collisionless then tidal dwarf galaxies should be free of dark matter - a condition that is difficult to reconcile with observations indicating that dwarf satellite galaxies are dark matter dominated. We argue that dissipative dark matter candidates, such as mirror dark matter, offer a simple solution to this puzzle.
  • Dissipative dark matter, such as mirror dark matter and related hidden sector dark matter candidates, requires an energy source to stabilize dark matter halos in spiral galaxies. It has been proposed previously that supernovae could be the source of this energy. Recently, it has been argued that this mechanism might explain two galactic scaling relations inferred from observations of spiral galaxies. One of which is that $\rho_0 r_0$ is roughly constant, and another relates the galactic luminosity to $r_0$. [$\rho_0$ is the dark matter central density and $r_0$ is the core radius.] Here we derive equations for the heating of the halo via supernova energy, and the cooling of the halo via thermal bremsstrahlung. These equations are numerically solved to obtain constraints on the $\rho_0, \ r_0$ parameters appropriate for spiral galaxies. These constraints are in remarkable agreement with the aforementioned scaling relations.
  • We examine data from the DAMA, CoGeNT, CRESST-II and CDMS/Si direct detection experiments in the context of multi-component hidden sector dark matter. The models considered feature a hidden sector with two or more stable particles charged under an unbroken $U(1)'$ gauge interaction. The new gauge field can interact with the standard $U(1)_Y$ via renormalizable kinetic mixing, leading to Rutherford-type elastic scattering of the dark matter particles off ordinary nuclei. We consider the simplest generic model of this type, with a hidden sector composed of two stable particles, $F_1$ and $F_2$. We find that this simple model can simultaneously explain the DAMA, CoGeNT, CRESST-II and CDMS/Si data. This explanation has some tension with the most recent results from the XENON100 experiment.
  • The CRESST-II collaboration have announced evidence for the direct detection of dark matter in 730 kg-days exposure of a CaWO$_4$ target. We examine these new results, along with DAMA and CoGeNT data, in the context of the mirror dark matter framework. We show that all three experiments can be simultaneously explained via kinetic mixing induced elastic scattering of a mirror metal component off target nuclei. This metal component can be as heavy as Fe$'$ if the galactic rotational velocity is relatively low: $v_{rot} \stackrel{<}{\sim} 220$ km/s. This explanation is consistent with the constraints from the other experiments, such as CDMS/Ge, CDMS/Si and XENON100 when modest $\sim 20-30%$ uncertainties in energy scale are considered.
  • We argue that the $t \bar t$ production asymmetry observed at the tevatron might be simply explained if the standard $SU(3)_c$ QCD theory is extended to $SU(N_c)$ which is spontaneously broken at a scale just above the weak scale. The extended gauge interactions amplify the radiative QCD contribution to the asymmetry and can potentially explain the observations if $N_c \stackrel{>}{\sim} 5$. This explanation requires a relatively low $SU(N_c)$ symmetry breaking scale $\stackrel{<}{\sim} 0.5-1$ TeV. We check that such a low $SU(N_c)$ symmetry breaking scale is consistent with current collider data. Importantly this scenario predicts an abundance of striking phenomena which will be probed at the LHC. The $SU(N_c)$ model also illustrates the idea that a beyond standard model contribution to the $t \bar t$ asymmetry might arise primarily via radiative corrections rather than at tree-level.
  • Mirror dark matter is a dissipative and self-interacting multiparticle dark matter candidate which can explain the DAMA, CoGeNT and CRESST-II direct detection experiments. This explanation requires photon-mirror photon kinetic mixing of strength $\epsilon \sim 10^{-9}$. Mirror dark matter with such kinetic mixing can potentially leave distinctive signatures on the CMB anisotropy spectrum. We show that the most important effect of kinetic mixing on the CMB anisotropies is the suppression of the height of the third and higher odd peaks. If $\epsilon \stackrel{>}{\sim} 10^{-9}$ then this feature can be observed by the PLANCK mission in the near future.
  • Light WIMP dark matter and hidden sector dark matter have been proposed to explain the DAMA, CoGeNT and CRESST-II data. Both of these approaches feature spin independent elastic scattering of dark matter particles on nuclei. Light WIMP dark matter invokes a single particle species which interacts with ordinary matter via contact interactions. By contrast hidden sector dark matter is typically multi-component and is assumed to interact via the exchange of a massless mediator. Such hidden sector dark matter thereby predicts a sharply rising nuclear recoil spectrum, $dR/dE_R \sim 1/E_R^2$ due to this dynamics, while WIMP dark matter predicts a spectrum which depends sensitively on the WIMP mass, $m_\chi$. We compare and contrast these two very different possible origins of the CoGeNT low energy excess. In the relevant energy range, the recoil spectra predicted by these two theories approximately agree provided $m_\chi \simeq 8.5$ GeV - close to the value favoured from fits to the CoGeNT and CDMS low energy data. Forthcoming experiments including C-4, CDEX, and the MAJORANA demonstrator, are expected to provide reasonably precise measurements of the low energy Germanium recoil spectrum, including the annual modulation amplitude, which should differentiate between these two theoretical possibilities.
  • Dark matter might reside in a hidden sector which contains an unbroken $U(1)'$ gauge interaction kinetically mixed with standard $U(1)_Y$. Mirror dark matter provides a well motivated example of such a theory. We show that the DAMA, CoGeNT and CRESST-II experiments can be simultaneously explained within this hidden sector framework. An experiment in the Southern Hemisphere is needed to test this explanation via a diurnal modulation signal.
  • Mirror dark matter interacting with ordinary matter via photon-mirror photon kinetic mixing can explain the DAMA, CoGeNT and CRESSTII direct detection experiments. This explanation requires kinetic mixing of strength $\epsilon \sim 10^{-9}$. Such kinetic mixing will have important implications for early Universe cosmology. We calculate the additional relativistic energy density at recombination, $\delta N_{eff} [CMB]$. We also calculate the effects for big bang nucleosynthesis, $\delta N_{eff} [BBN]$. Current hints that both $\delta N_{eff} [CMB]$ and $\delta N_{eff} [BBN]$ are non-zero and positive can be accommodated within this framework if $\epsilon \approx few \times 10^{-9}$. In the near future, measurements from the Planck mission will either confirm these hints or constrain $\epsilon \stackrel{<}{\sim} 10^{-9}$.
  • Mirror and more generic hidden sector dark matter models can simultaneously explain the DAMA, CoGeNT and CRESST dark matter signals consistently with the null results of the other experiments. This type of dark matter can be captured by the Earth and shield detectors because it is self-interacting. This effect will lead to a diurnal modulation in dark matter detectors. We estimate the size of this effect for dark matter detectors in various locations. For a detector located in the northern hemisphere, this effect is expected to peak in April and can be detected for optimistic parameter choices. The diurnal variation is expected to be much larger for detectors located in the southern hemisphere. In particular, if the CoGeNT detector were moved to e.g. Sierra Grande, Argentina then a $5 \sigma$ dark matter discovery would be possible in around 30 days of operation.
  • The CoGeNT collaboration has recently made available new data collected over a period of 15 months. In addition to more accurately measuring the spectrum of nuclear recoil candidate events they have announced evidence for an annual modulation signal. We examine the implications of these new results within the context of mirror/hidden sector dark matter models. We find that the new CoGeNT data can be explained within this framework with parameter space consistent with the DAMA annual modulation signal, and the null results of the other experiments. We also point out that the CoGeNT spectrum at low energies is observed to obey $dR/dE_R \propto 1/E_R^2$ which suggests that dark matter interacts via Rutherford scattering rather than the more commonly assumed contact (four-fermion) interaction.